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I really like to colors, shading on the horns, and highlights throughout.

 

I have mixed emotions on the eyes though.  They both look like eyes, and not like eyes at the same time.  It's weirding me out in a good sort of way because I can't figure it out.

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Beautiful painting. 

I see the issue people are having with the eyes:  without an appreciable pupil, it is a little strange.

 

Cataracts or blindsight would explain it away, but it is what it is.

 

Have you thought of a more fantastic pupil option?  Hourglass perhaps?

 

Or is this beauty Done! Done?

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5 hours ago, Clearman said:

I really like to colors, shading on the horns, and highlights throughout.

 

I have mixed emotions on the eyes though.  They both look like eyes, and not like eyes at the same time.  It's weirding me out in a good sort of way because I can't figure it out.

 

The eyes are intended to be a bit unsettling and other worldly. Ysera is based on World of Warcraft Ysera that is known as the Dreamer. Her eyes are typically supposed to glow blue but I wanted to try something new with her eyes. Her full form:

 

Ysera_BotA.thumb.jpg.ee4764076e733594eaf929f0ed7d2155.jpg

 

2 hours ago, Darcstaar said:

Beautiful painting. 

I see the issue people are having with the eyes:  without an appreciable pupil, it is a little strange.

 

Cataracts or blindsight would explain it away, but it is what it is.

 

Have you thought of a more fantastic pupil option?  Hourglass perhaps?

 

Or is this beauty Done! Done?

 

I'd call her done until I practice sculpting her jewelry! The eyes I struggled with a lot because I wanted to do something different but still have her recognisable as Ysera. I may brighten or darken the contrast a bit more but ultimately, no other design changes would be applied.

 

I'm glad you all like her though! I'm definitely in love with this bust!

Edited by MissMelons
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Fantastic!

The colors are beautiful and I also really like the way you did the eyes.

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2 hours ago, MissMelons said:

The eyes are intended to be a bit unsettling and other worldly. Ysera is based on World of Warcraft Ysera that is known as the Dreamer. Her eyes are typically supposed to glow blue but I wanted to try something new with her eyes.

 

And this makes total sense.  I've noticed over course of the day that I've just kept staring at this.  So regardless of whether I'm weirded out or not, this is a great art.  I would love nothing more than to have someone so entranced by something I've painted. 

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I love it!

 

It almost looks like a painting instead of a mini.

Something in Aquarel.

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