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Paint Thinning

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So, I'm trying to learn advanced techniques, like wet blending, 2 brush blending, glazing - and i'm having a hard time with controlling the paint.  It is beading up, or running to the crevices.  I've tried thinning with matte medium tofix this, but the paint isn't actually thinner, just more transparent, which is half the battle.

I've recently started loading the brush, and trying to wick away moisture, but feel like i am losing paint.  I'm also using a wet pallet, but have found myself moving back and forth from wet and dry pallets, because I am not finding the wet pallet actually extending the life of my paints (although, I can add a bit of medium or water and reconstitute them pretty well)

Any help would be appreciated. 

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Beading up is usually a problem when the surface being painted is water-resistant. Some common causes of that are skin oils from being handled or leftover mold release (common on resin figures). A solutio is to wash miniatures well with warm water, dish detergent, and a soft toothbrush before painting.

 

Reaper Bones figures are known to resist thinned paint, so it is recommended that one put on one’s first coat of paint full strength (or my favorite life hack, a priming coat of thinned Reaper Brown Liner).

 

Running into cracks means you have too much paint on your brush. Blot most of it out onto paper towels or something before touching the brush to the figure.

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I would also add that in the context of these techniques, thinning = transparent and could probably be used interchangeably.  

 

Regarding use of a wet pallet, don't consider a wet pallet for keeping fresh when out of the bottle.  It's really meant to keep paint usable for a couple hours, instead of 20-ish minutes like in a dry well.  It can keep paint longer, but I don't think it is really intended for that.   I also tend to use a small piece of parchment paper in my wet pallet to purposefully limit the amount of paint that can be on it at any one time and artificially limit how long I'm dealing with it.  Sure it "wastes" paint, but it's only a couple drops a time. 

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I've been using both thinner medium and glaze medium together with good results. They seem to thin the paint with out it desaturating. The ones I'm using are Vallejo. I'm not sure what the matte medium is for.

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I thin my paints with water because it is easy and I am lazy. Sometimes I end up doing it on a brush by brush basis - get brush wet, wiggle it in paint, test on towel. I don't always have the same consistency. I've gotten good enough to gauge if a brush load is how I want it to be in general though. Sometimes I make a thinned batch if I need a bunch; not always. I have used flow improver for a wash - it was nice but I didn't find it crucial. 

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Well my first thought are you are trying to wet blend without using a retarder, ie liquitex slo-dri or reapers drying retarder, goldens retarder. Matte medium is use for glazes which are usually used with layering techiques. All paints are different, but my understanding is when wet-blending or two-brush blending the paint should be a little thick (not watered) thus I suggest trying a retarder instead of water or matte medium. Also note: flow improver is basically used for washes also not wet blending. 

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My first time with a wet pallet was similar to yours. Like mentioned above get some parchment paper. Also soak your "sponge" till it has a tiny bit of water setting on the top. Then lay your parchment down then you should be good. The first paper I used was good and reusable but didn't transfer moisture to the paints very well.

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