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Which base size for D&D 5e (Bones) Orc

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Hello community,


I finally started preparing my bones 3 orcs and want to base them. I am wondering what base size would be the correct if we use them for d&d 5e ? I assume 25mm, but from the figure size it’s more 32mm. Anyone some suggestions please? Do you think 32mm would work as well with the d&d or pathfinder map tiles?




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 The grids on the D&D and Pathfinder stuff are 1-inch squares, so 25mm bases are better. I don't have those orcs so I can't say for sure that they'd fit on 25mm bases. You can try to mount them diagonally to get them to fit, and there's a good chance their feet may hang over the edges a little bit depending on their stance. I'd also suggest removing the integral base and mounting them directly to the square base for a better fit.


Edited by Mad Jack
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I don't have those orcs either, but 25mm is the way to go. I use rounds (makes positioning easier on a crowded board). If the feet hang over a little I tend not to worry much. EM-4 makes good plastic bases, but IIRC Reaper has 25mm rounds too...



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Go with a 25mm HEX!!!!!! This you know exactly your front arc and the your diagonals. MUhahahah 

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I'm not super duper experienced on tiles/size but when I ran a one-shot at work using the poster map that came with a 3/3.5 DMG, the base I used for Khavith fit just fine on the grid.

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25mm or 1 inch is the correct size base, however these orcs stances dont fit very well on that base.  I havent based mine yet because of that problem and I havent figured out a good solution yet.

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Thanks! If 25mm is the correct size I need to rethink my plans for the orcs. Need to find a solution to get them on those ones.. 


I better continue with the lizardmen.. they seem to fit to 25 and wait till I get a solution to have a decent base for the oversized orcs.

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Yea, 25mm is the base you technically want to use, but the Bones orcs are in wide stances that don't play well with them. I'm almost at the point where I want to get rid of grids entirely for RPGs and just go with using a measuring tape like a wargamer(back to the RPG roots!) because I like dynamically posed minis, but dynamically posed minis tend not to work well with RPG grids and bases.

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I'm currently working on those orcs and I'm basing them on 30 mm I think. They fit well on that and I'm okay with them being a bit larger than my adventurers. They still fit into that one grid thing okay-ish. I'm willing to play them as medium creatures on the bigger side of things in my 5e games. 


25 mm und 30 mm base on 1 inch grid paper.

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