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Well, I get to dive into the first chapter of the module tonight with my group. It seems to be a pretty straightforward dungeon crawl with a front-loaded info dump (which I'm trying to figure out how to handle gracefully; I don't have much experience with running pre-written adventures). Wish me luck! ^_^:wacko:

 

I will report back with my thoughts and impressions afterwards.

 

Huzzah! 

--OneBoot :D 

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Fumbles happen. I've smacked myself in the head and the leg with my bo while doing kata, on several occasions, I've seen people lose their weapon from a successful block on a few occasions. I like them to a certain extent, but for us, you have to roll to confirm a fumble the same as a crit, so they don't happen that often, and in my group, we keep them as simple, and reasonable as possible. Magic weapons don't break, dropped weapons do not go spinning across the room, mostly you are likely to lose an action having to recover from our whoops

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...I have revised my estimation of this as a "pretty straightforward dungeon crawl." Oh the module wasn't the problem, it was my players that made things all kinds of complicated.

 

I'll put my summary in a spoiler tag, so as to not spoil it for those who haven't started on the first chapter.

 

SPOILERS FOR THE LOST STAR (Doomsday Dawn Part 1)

Also, Wall of Text warning.

 

Note: Please be cautious with copy/pasting any of what I write in the spoiler, so as to prevent spoiling module-specific info for those who haven't yet begun the playtest

The first enemy the PCs see is a Sewer Ooze. "No problem," I think, "this will be a good first fight so we can all get a feel for how combat work-"
MrBoot: "I bought a whole bunch of caltrops, so I'm going to lay those down, then hit it with a rock from my sling and then run away. As it mindlessly attacks me, it will hit at least one of the caltrop squares and take 1 Bleed damage each round until it dies."
*insert 15 minute 'discussion' about how persistent damage works, and whether an Ooze is intelligent enough to even attempt a Medicine check to stop bleeding (oozing?)* 
I finally decided to roll a handful of checks (though certainly not the 34 I was entitled to), and it never once rolled a 20, so once the PCs came back after 5 minutes, it was dead in a corner.

Alrighty, next encounter is 4 Goblin Warriors trying (not very successfully) to build a statue of the final boss of this area out of garbage. "Excellent!" I think to myself, "now we can really try out the combat system with multiple enem-"
Fizzbit (the goblin alchemist) + MrBoot: "Hey, we can speak goblin! And one of us has Engineering! We'll see if we can convince them that we can help them build their statue then we won't have to fight them!"
*insert much inner GM debating of 'this is a playtest, stick to the intended combat stress-testing' and 'actually that could be pretty awesome and I don't like to discourage players from creative non-violent solutions to problems*
"Okay, give me some Diplomacy checks and tell me exactly what you guys say."

 They actually rolled pretty well on nearly all of their checks, and introduced the other party members as a "hair troll" (dwarven fighter) and a "stunted ogre" (human wizard). Meanwhile, the gnome sorceress, unable to understand goblin, tried to do pantomime of being friendly and helping to build the statue, but her roll wasn't great so it mostly just confused the goblins. :lol: She regaled them with what amounted to the Iliad and the Odyssey, except inserting the name of the final boss, while the rest helped build the trash hobgoblin. By the end, all 4 goblins were so overcome with the awesomeness of the statue and the literary overload from the sorceress that they were friendly and 1 was willing to continue with the PCs as their guide.

Next was a sort of central chamber, with a few small chambers off of it and a tunnel to the next area. MrBoot just wanted to skip those rooms, since in his experience, side rooms tend to generally be full of very avoidable nasty. The gnome sorceress decided she wanted to hunt for magical items, though, and poked her nose into each of them. The group avoided a mind-fogging fungus in the first room, failed every Medicine check to locate information in the second room, and the gnome managed to avoid anything beyond minimal damage from the 6 Giant Centipedes in the third room. They'd have had more trouble, but the module specifically states that they don't pursue prey out of the room. :huh:

I'll continue the tale at a later point, since I'm quite tired and must be up early to help with an event. Next time, look forward to more goblin diplomacy, Intimidation, a WHOLE FREAKING TON of looking up of rules, and incautious handling of a magical object!

 

Rules thoughts:

  • Paizo seems to have approached PF2 with the mindset of CHANGE ALL THE THINGS! Good golly, I can't think of a single spell, ability, or combat technique that we looked up that WASN'T altered somehow. So now we know not to take ANY assumption of how the new rules work as valid. <_<
  • I only discovered shortly before the game that Paizo is apparently doing rules modifications DURING the playtest. It would have been nice to inform people of this; the first I knew of it was when I thought to read through the GM survey ahead of time, so I'd know what metrics needed tracking. One of the questions was essentially "Did you use the Update document?" My first thought: "What Update document???" :huh:
  • Everybody needs to be more familiar with the rules, including myself. Especially myself. Learning how to cast a spell...should not have been as complicated as it was. 'How many actions does a spell actually take' was not well explained.
  • Given the (spoilered) shenanigans of my players, I don't know how valid my group's data will be. I think from now on, I will need to be stern in reminding them that this is a testing scenario, and to maybe not engage in quite as many shenanigans as they typically would in a regular game. Normally I have ZERO problem with shenanigans (being a perpetrator of such quite often), but this is a special case. Can't really stress-test combat if y'all keep avoiding it! :wacko:
  • Hero Points have not been relevant so far. Nor have Critical Failures, since those have all been with melee attacks so far. Further thoughts on those after they've come up in play.
  • Everyone is still not a fan of how the character sheet is laid out. This will be mentioned in the surveys
  • Caltrops need more information: are they a hazard? If so, they need Hazard stats
  • How does drawing a weapon work now? Or swapping one during combat? Will need to read through the rulebook some more to see if that is explained anywhere
  • [strikethrough]DO NOT LIKE the layout of the Bestiary. Please put all of the monsters in alphabetical order please, not by category. I should not need to take two minutes to discover that a Quasit is not listed under Q, but under D in the Demons category.[/strikethrough]

I know I had more thoughts, but that's all I can remember for now. I hope my feedback is useful for others. ^_^

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot
weird spacing issues
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Certain monsters have always been grouped into types. Dragons, Demons, Devils, Slaads, etc. It actually makes things easier generally. You don't want to have to flip to R for Red Dragon, G for Green Dragon, etc. You instead look for "Dragon, Red" and "Dragon, Green." Even in the original Pathfinder Bestiary the Quasit is listed as "Demon, Quasit" rather than having a listing in Q. 

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1 hour ago, Unruly said:

Certain monsters have always been grouped into types. Dragons, Demons, Devils, Slaads, etc. It actually makes things easier generally. You don't want to have to flip to R for Red Dragon, G for Green Dragon, etc. You instead look for "Dragon, Red" and "Dragon, Green." Even in the original Pathfinder Bestiary the Quasit is listed as "Demon, Quasit" rather than having a listing in Q. 

 

Ah, okay, I stand corrected. It has been several years since I last GM'd. :blush:

 

Huzzah! 

--OneBoot :D

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On 8/16/2018 at 7:03 PM, TheAuldGrump said:

I will, however, point out that that is not at all what you described in the post I referenced.

 

A wee bit of goal post moving, eh?

 

The Auld Grump

All dragons are known to have pretty high AC (the older, the tougher). So I included the high DR on the dragon because there will be the 1 in 400 chance of a confirmed critical hit from an arrow. They sting! With a high DR, they tickle. Practically acupuncture.

 

I could use an elder air elemental who has very high touch AC. My original point was that foes with high AC are already easier to miss, but should they make you miss more badly more often?

 

For critical failures, I think I'd be more comfortable with a sort of table that does take into account your BAB. You rolled a 1 on this attack? Roll 1d20 on this table and add your BAB. A low result is bad (self injury; weapon damaged; dropped weapon), a high result is merely annoying (lose next action; -1 next attack; -1 AC; etc.). A result beyond the table is a regular miss. Specialized in your weapon? Or it's a natural weapon? Add +5! Even less chance of great failure. Last of your iterative attacks? Still use your highest BAB on the table. This way, hasted level 20 monks with Fury of Blows will not end up in wheelchairs at the end of each battle.

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1 hour ago, Cranky Dog said:

All dragons are known to have pretty high AC (the older, the tougher). So I included the high DR on the dragon because there will be the 1 in 400 chance of a confirmed critical hit from an arrow. They sting! With a high DR, they tickle. Practically acupuncture.

 

I could use an elder air elemental who has very high touch AC. My original point was that foes with high AC are already easier to miss, but should they make you miss more badly more often?

 

For critical failures, I think I'd be more comfortable with a sort of table that does take into account your BAB. You rolled a 1 on this attack? Roll 1d20 on this table and add your BAB. A low result is bad (self injury; weapon damaged; dropped weapon), a high result is merely annoying (lose next action; -1 next attack; -1 AC; etc.). A result beyond the table is a regular miss. Specialized in your weapon? Or it's a natural weapon? Add +5! Even less chance of great failure. Last of your iterative attacks? Still use your highest BAB on the table. This way, hasted level 20 monks with Fury of Blows will not end up in wheelchairs at the end of each battle.

Easy answer - Yes, they should make you miss more badly, more often. (At least with the Touch Attack based fumble) - a mobile target is both harder to hit and is more likely to make you lose balance.

 

In point of fact, that is what a whole lot of Aikido is based around - get the target to over extend. Even in the SCA, the trick with sword and board is to pull people into a pattern, and then exploit it.

 

Contrary to your assertion - people do fumble, and the only way to avoid fumbling in combat is to avoid combat. If you are striking twenty times in six seconds then that is twenty chances that you will mess up.

 

But you are very fond of reducio in absurdum - the fact is that you just plain don't like fumbles, and no argument will convince you otherwise.

 

So, for you I am introducing the following table -

Roll:

Natural 1 - when attacking- your character must make a Fort save or die immediately.

Modified 1 - you miss.

 

Nice and simple! ::P:

 

Another, more likely method, is that when you get a Natural 1 and then confirm the fumble, your target gets an Attack of Opportunity on you, following the normal rules for AoO. (So, if they have already used their Attack of Opportunity/Reaction for this round, they cannot capitalize on your mistake.)

 

 

If you are using a Ranged weapon, then make a check to see if you drop the weapon or break the string. Bowstrings break. It happens, and with the materials available in a D&D world, probably more often than in our modern world.

 

In play, I have never seen a character die from a fumble - critical hits are much more likely to cause death, and for many years I have used a rule stolen from Swashbuckling Adventures - if a character would die from the damage from a critical, they may instead opt to roll on a permanent damage table, effectively losing an arm, leg, eye, or etc. rather than do the Mortal Coil Shuffle. Regenerate, Heal, or similar magics can fix the damage, but Cure Light, Moderate, or Serious Wounds will not.

 

If there are twenty goblins firing bows, it is a lot more likely that one of them will Critical than it is that one of them will Fumble.

 

And that is a lot more likely to do in the heroes than any amount of fumbling.

 

In the real world, the killer was infection, or a piercing of the bowels.

 

The Auld Grump

Edited by TheAuldGrump
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10 hours ago, OneBoot said:

*insert 15 minute 'discussion' about how persistent damage works, and whether an Ooze is intelligent enough to even attempt a Medicine check to stop bleeding (oozing?)* 

 

 

I would think it would have a trait that prevents it from taking bleed damage.. odd

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3 hours ago, TheAuldGrump said:

But you are very fond of reducio in absurdum - the fact is that you just plain don't like fumbles, and no argument will convince you otherwise.

Though I've had bad experiences with fumbles, from my point of view, it's not so much that I don't like fumbles, but that the likelihood of fumbling increases with experience instead of going down. Staying with Pathfinder or D&D 3.x, while the hero becomes better at combat, the foes also tend to become progressively harder to hit, and those extra iterative attacks will just increase your chance of fumbling.

 

I've played a monk in Pathfinder, and we used the crit failure deck. It was not to my advantage. The frequency of my fumbles was much much higher than my critical hits. And we did lose people due to the lingering consequences of some fumbles.

 

Critical misses should still happen. I just expect my legendary heroes to have less chance (not zero chance) to fail embarrassingly.

 

Edited by Cranky Dog
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7 hours ago, Cranky Dog said:

Though I've had bad experiences with fumbles, from my point of view, it's not so much that I don't like fumbles, but that the likelihood of fumbling increases with experience instead of going down. Staying with Pathfinder or D&D 3.x, while the hero becomes better at combat, the foes also tend to become progressively harder to hit, and those extra iterative attacks will just increase your chance of fumbling.

 

I've played a monk in Pathfinder, and we used the crit failure deck. It was not to my advantage. The frequency of my fumbles was much much higher than my critical hits. And we did lose people due to the lingering consequences of some fumbles.

 

Critical misses should still happen. I just expect my legendary heroes to have less chance (not zero chance) to fail embarrassingly.

 

That sounds more like you need new dice. ::P:

 

Probability is not in favor of that happening - in fact the odds are almost astronomically high against it.

 

It is also possible that you have a GM that did not notice that the Fumble must be Confirmed, just like a Crit, or he was just a jerk and adjusted the rules to make the Fumbles more frequent. (I am leaning toward this answer, for the record.)

 

If he was requiring Critical Hits to be confirmed, but Fumbles happening on every Natural 1... it would explain your experience.

 

Using just the raw numbers, criticals are much more likely - with (for example) long swords and Long Bows having a chance of Critical on 19-20, rather than just a 20.

 

Again, assuming competent combatants. (A common GM mistake is to have a few big monsters, rather than a mix of one or two big monsters and a small horde of mooks.)

 

The optional rules are also kind of important - for example limiting Fumbles to one per combat, and allowing characters with Weapon Focus to draw twice and choose the Fumble that they prefer. (In practice - the player does not always shoose the lesser of two evils, but instead opts for the funnier of two evils.)

 

But, in general, the Fumble rules favor the PCs for exactly the same reason that the Critical rules favor the monsters - there are more monsters, and typically they roll more dice as a consequence. Twenty rolls offers more chances to Fumble - favoring the PC, and more chances to Fumble - favoring the monsters.

 

The Auld Grump - a lot of that is actually in the books - but some GMs 'know' what they are doing, and don't crunch the numbers enough to realize that, no, no they don't know what they are doing. (Not just D&D/Pathfinder - the most egregious examples that I have encountered were for the old Storyteller system.) Me, I used to use the Monster Mark from the very early issues of White Dwarf - I have practice crunching numbers.

 

*EDIT* The other option, with a monk, is not to rely on Flurry of Blows. The crunching with a large number of attacks of decreasing accuracy is not entirely favorable - save the Flurries for the Mooks.

Edited by TheAuldGrump
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18 hours ago, OneBoot said:

...I have revised my estimation of this as a "pretty straightforward dungeon crawl." Oh the module wasn't the problem, it was my players that made things all kinds of complicated.

 

I'll put my summary in a spoiler tag, so as to not spoil it for those who haven't started on the first chapter.

 

SPOILERS FOR THE LOST STAR (Doomsday Dawn Part 1)

Also, Wall of Text warning.

  Reveal hidden contents

Note: Please be cautious with copy/pasting any of what I write in the spoiler, so as to prevent spoiling module-specific info for those who haven't yet begun the playtest

The first enemy the PCs see is a Sewer Ooze. "No problem," I think, "this will be a good first fight so we can all get a feel for how combat work-"
MrBoot: "I bought a whole bunch of caltrops, so I'm going to lay those down, then hit it with a rock from my sling and then run away. As it mindlessly attacks me, it will hit at least one of the caltrop squares and take 1 Bleed damage each round until it dies."
*insert 15 minute 'discussion' about how persistent damage works, and whether an Ooze is intelligent enough to even attempt a Medicine check to stop bleeding (oozing?)* 
I finally decided to roll a handful of checks (though certainly not the 34 I was entitled to), and it never once rolled a 20, so once the PCs came back after 5 minutes, it was dead in a corner.

Alrighty, next encounter is 4 Goblin Warriors trying (not very successfully) to build a statue of the final boss of this area out of garbage. "Excellent!" I think to myself, "now we can really try out the combat system with multiple enem-"
Fizzbit (the goblin alchemist) + MrBoot: "Hey, we can speak goblin! And one of us has Engineering! We'll see if we can convince them that we can help them build their statue then we won't have to fight them!"
*insert much inner GM debating of 'this is a playtest, stick to the intended combat stress-testing' and 'actually that could be pretty awesome and I don't like to discourage players from creative non-violent solutions to problems*
"Okay, give me some Diplomacy checks and tell me exactly what you guys say."

 They actually rolled pretty well on nearly all of their checks, and introduced the other party members as a "hair troll" (dwarven fighter) and a "stunted ogre" (human wizard). Meanwhile, the gnome sorceress, unable to understand goblin, tried to do pantomime of being friendly and helping to build the statue, but her roll wasn't great so it mostly just confused the goblins. :lol: She regaled them with what amounted to the Iliad and the Odyssey, except inserting the name of the final boss, while the rest helped build the trash hobgoblin. By the end, all 4 goblins were so overcome with the awesomeness of the statue and the literary overload from the sorceress that they were friendly and 1 was willing to continue with the PCs as their guide.

Next was a sort of central chamber, with a few small chambers off of it and a tunnel to the next area. MrBoot just wanted to skip those rooms, since in his experience, side rooms tend to generally be full of very avoidable nasty. The gnome sorceress decided she wanted to hunt for magical items, though, and poked her nose into each of them. The group avoided a mind-fogging fungus in the first room, failed every Medicine check to locate information in the second room, and the gnome managed to avoid anything beyond minimal damage from the 6 Giant Centipedes in the third room. They'd have had more trouble, but the module specifically states that they don't pursue prey out of the room. :huh:

I'll continue the tale at a later point, since I'm quite tired and must be up early to help with an event. Next time, look forward to more goblin diplomacy, Intimidation, a WHOLE FREAKING TON of looking up of rules, and incautious handling of a magical object!

 

Rules thoughts:

  • Paizo seems to have approached PF2 with the mindset of CHANGE ALL THE THINGS! Good golly, I can't think of a single spell, ability, or combat technique that we looked up that WASN'T altered somehow. So now we know not to take ANY assumption of how the new rules work as valid. <_<
  • I only discovered shortly before the game that Paizo is apparently doing rules modifications DURING the playtest. It would have been nice to inform people of this; the first I knew of it was when I thought to read through the GM survey ahead of time, so I'd know what metrics needed tracking. One of the questions was essentially "Did you use the Update document?" My first thought: "What Update document???" :huh:
  • Everybody needs to be more familiar with the rules, including myself. Especially myself. Learning how to cast a spell...should not have been as complicated as it was. 'How many actions does a spell actually take' was not well explained.
  • Given the (spoilered) shenanigans of my players, I don't know how valid my group's data will be. I think from now on, I will need to be stern in reminding them that this is a testing scenario, and to maybe not engage in quite as many shenanigans as they typically would in a regular game. Normally I have ZERO problem with shenanigans (being a perpetrator of such quite often), but this is a special case. Can't really stress-test combat if y'all keep avoiding it! :wacko:
  • Hero Points have not been relevant so far. Nor have Critical Failures, since those have all been with melee attacks so far. Further thoughts on those after they've come up in play.
  • Everyone is still not a fan of how the character sheet is laid out. This will be mentioned in the surveys
  • Caltrops need more information: are they a hazard? If so, they need Hazard stats
  • How does drawing a weapon work now? Or swapping one during combat? Will need to read through the rulebook some more to see if that is explained anywhere
  • [strikethrough]DO NOT LIKE the layout of the Bestiary. Please put all of the monsters in alphabetical order please, not by category. I should not need to take two minutes to discover that a Quasit is not listed under Q, but under D in the Demons category.[/strikethrough]

I know I had more thoughts, but that's all I can remember for now. I hope my feedback is useful for others. ^_^

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

 

Well documented, there. ::):

 

In particular, the Must Change Everything is why my group has adopted Not Changing Game - it is near unanimous that we don't like the new rules.

 

And, unconnected to the rules, Strikethrough is implemented by a bracketed S and ended with a bracketed /S Cushla Macree!

 

The Auld Grump - My feelings of 4e style Doooom! are increasing.... I am a much bigger fan of evolution rather of innovation.

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I've always found fumbles and crits to be best utilized to help tell the story.  If a fumble would result in a mediocre delay of the game I usually downplay it to your blade sticks in a groove of their armor spent your movement action pulling it out.  OTOH if the character has been full of their invincibility or it will help drive the story line or get the other characters to participate, then I will before creative.  It is a story after all, reality can come and go as it pleases.  If I want to listen to a combat report I'll go to a Kendo dojo or watch a documentary

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Unless there are Pugwampis or magic in effect, I generally allow the players to decide whether or not there are 'special' fumbles. Otherwise, I typically go with Lose Next Attack.

 

In general, the kids like the Fumble Deck more than the Critical Deck, so crits are straight up extra damage (barring Critical Feats) while Fumbles are more involved.

 

And, unless there are Pugwampis on the table, characters can only have one Fumble per combat. (Monsters can Fumble as much as they want.)

 

Also, I go with the older rules for Pugwampi - gnolls are not immune to the extra Fumble entertainment, even if they are allied to the Pugwampis - it is not something that they can control. 

 

The Auld Grump - halflings can get a similar power - and one that they can control.... We had one in the Pirates game.

 

*EDIT* The grown ups change their minds about using the decks almost every freakin' game... If they are hurt then the decks stay in their boxes, if they are fresh and ready, then out come the decks.

Edited by TheAuldGrump
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The only thing I have to add to this right now are the playtest tales of one Colette Brunel on the Paizo forums.  They are entertaining reading, from an observing a trainwreck sort of way.  I don't think she's had a group yet that hasn't ended in a TPK. :lol:

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On 8/18/2018 at 9:57 PM, TheAuldGrump said:

That sounds more like you need new dice. ::P:

 

Dice in general (not just mine) may or may not have launched a holy crusade against me and my characters.

 

When I GMed for 2 years, my dice sucked while the players had an amazing amount of critical hits.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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      Entirely system-neutral, the guide can be used with any game system you choose.
      The Lost Lands are the setting for a tremendous array of over 150 individual adventures and sourcebooks already published by Frog God Games and Necromancer Games, many providing statistics in multiple game systems. All of this material is available to provide an almost inexhaustible resource of ready-made adventures and epic quests! Future Frog God Games products set in the Lost Lands will be built into the ever-growing canon finally revealed in this volume.
      About 4000 example pages of Lost Lands Adventures Pictured Above A small sample of some of these already-existing adventures include Rappan Athuk, Sword of Air, Slumbering Tsar, Bard's Gate, Necropolis, Cyclopean Deeps, The Borderland Provinces, The Blight, and Cults of the Sundered Kingdoms.
      Authors of adventures which have, over two decades, explored the Lost Lands include Clark Peterson, Ed Greenwood, Bill Webb, Gary Gygax, Matt Finch, Jim Ward, Morten Braten, Jeff Harkness, John Stater, Bill Kenower, Nate Paul, Dennis Sustare, and Alex Kammer.
      The authors of the guide to the Lost Lands include Bill Webb, Greg Vaughan, Matt Finch, Vicki Potter, Pat Lawinger, Anthony Pryor, Rhiannon Louve, Mark Greenberg, Ken Spencer, Casey Christofferson, and Thom Wilson.
      Shipping
      International shipping on a book this size may be quite expensive. If you are a non-US customer, please read the shipping information below. We anticipate shipping to be $80 to $100 for most countries, and could even be more. Shipping for the tapestries (and only the tapestries) is calculated into their price for Canada, the UK, the EU, and Australia. 
      The Lost Lands
    • By Rigel
      An elaborate sculpt, overflowing with detail in the Pathfinder fashion. (I swear, at least one of their artists must have a Thing for buckles and straps). Jigeke here has an excellent mask and a very long spear, a diverse collection of severed hands and paws, and a patchwork kilt of many kinds of hide. I know there's zebra and giraffe in there, and leopard as well. 

      It's Robert E. Howard's birthday today, and without him we probably wouldn't have the Barbarian class as a thing (see: Conan the), or Serpent-folk as insidious infiltrators (see: Kull), or puritan monster-hunters (see: Solomon Kane) as pulp/fantasy tropes. So it seems good to commemorate him with a guy who could be a good stand-in for N'Longa, Kane's sorcerous blood-brother and recurring ally. 




    • By dks
      I am playing in the Pathfinder "Ruins of Azlant" Adventure Path campaign.  A few of the PCs have some healing magic, but we didn't have an actual cleric until a PC recently took the Leadership feat, and an NPC cleric joined the party as his cohort.   (Click here for the Show-Off thread about the figure that I use for my character.)
      The new cohort-cleric, Father Kurvis, is middle-aged and acts like a curmudgeon but has a kind heart.  He worships Abadar, the god of cities, law, merchants, and wealth.  Abadar's colors are gold and black, and his holy symbol is a golden key.
      Our GM has an extensive collection of prepainted plastic figures (D&D and Pathfinder), and this Village Priest seemed appropriate.  It is from a 2005 D&D miniatures release.   I offered to repaint it to be specifically Kurvis.
      Two hours of slinging paint got me to "finished" ... and after I took the first set of photos, I saw how bugged and asymmetrical his eyes were, so I just spent a few more minutes touching them up.
       
      Before and after:
       

       

       
      Enjoy,
      Derek
       
    • By Inarah
      On the left, Anya Pirate Queen by Magnificent Egos.  Did not start out to paint a pink pirate princess, but that's sort of where she ended up after I highlighted up the purple coat and painted the skulls as rosettes. 
       

       
      On the right, Deep Cuts Pathfinder human female paladin, one of two that come in the package.  A+ on the dynamic pose, C for loss of detail in the molding process. I wanted it to be better but it turned into a wash and drybrush job due to the sculpt. It's for tabletop. 
       
       
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