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Jordan Peacock

Goremaw the Devourer (Bones Kickstarter 3)

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unearthing_the_truth_by_jordangreywolf-d

 

"Goremaw the Devourer" plastic gaming miniature from the Reaper Bones Kickstarter #3 (no SKU yet assigned), surrounded by a number of "investigator" miniatures from Fantasy Flight Games's "Mansions of Madness" board game and expansions.  The terrain board is part of the "Forgotten City" theme from Secret Weapon Miniatures.  All were painted in craft acrylics (Apple Barrel, Americana).  I'm in the process of painting up Digital_Rampage's "Mansions of Madness" investigator and adversary miniatures, starting with just basic colors ("good enough for tabletop") and working my way up to adding more details, along with brush-writing names of the investigators on the bottoms of the bases.  My hope is that by matching the illustrations as much as possible (and actually writing names on bases) it'll be easier to distinguish them when picking out minis and moving them during the game.  (Otherwise, if you have a bunch of blobby gray miniatures in assorted poses that start to run into just variations on the same basics, it's easy to get mixed up about who's who.)

"Mansions of Madness" does a nice job of quickly getting to the heart of a "Call of Cthulhu" adventure with the usual mix of running around looking for clues to help piece together the story, frantic combat against demented cultists or otherworldly monsters, and then time runs out and everything starts falling apart and right when you really, REALLY needed someone to finish that sealing ritual or just CLOSE THE DOOR ALREADY, someone goes mad.    


Although, it can get a mite bit perplexing at times: The worst offender is the "Escape from Innsmouth."  It's rated as one of the more difficult scenarios, and for good reason.  First off, you're trying to escape a town, but it's really just a town-decorated MAZE, and of course you have no clue even what direction you're supposed to be headed at first.  There's a boat to escape on, and an agent who's investigating the town.  The boat simply will not leave unless that agent is on board.  You can follow his instructions and summon the boat and all that, but unless one of the PCs is personally with him, leading him BY THE HAND every step of the way, he hasn't enough of a sense of self-preservation to actually make it to the boat on his own.  In our first playthrough, we had actually made it to the boat, wondering why the heck the agent wasn't there with us, as the mobs were burning down the city, the docks, EVERYTHING, and yet the idiot boat captain couldn't be bothered to actually leave the dock, while everything burned down around us.  As several of my co-players have mentioned, if this were an RPG, at some point someone would have just blackjacked the guy and hit the "reverse" on the engines and pulled the boat out of the dock, never mind if that means the "investigation" has failed.  (I mean, c'mon, the nutcases just burned down their own town.)  We've actually played through that scenario multiple times now, and failed every single time because it turns out that there was YET ANOTHER THING that needed to be done before that suicidal agent would dare set foot on the boat.  (He won't leave without every last Piece of Evidence that can be scoured from random places in the town, even if the room he's standing in and refusing to leave is CURRENTLY ON FIRE.)

So, yeah, it has some issues.    But mostly it's a blast.  The tiles are very nicely drawn, and I could envision using all the elements in the game for an honest-to-goodness Call of Cthulhu adventure, only with an actual GM at the reins rather than an iPad and some board game rules.  Also, the way they handle "damage" (both physical and mental) is rather novel, done via cards: at the very base of it, it's similar to "hit points," in that if you take too many hits, you're either Wounded (physical) or Insane (mental), and then take too many AGAIN, and you're simply out of the action.  However, on top of that, each card may have a specific effect, penalizing your ability to take actions, how much you can carry, your ability to move quickly, etc., so it's not like certain "hit point" based games where you can keep getting shot or punched or stabbed multiple times and you're PERFECTLY FINE until that last shot/punch/stab happens to push you over the edge and suddenly - BANG - you're out.  I keep thinking that I might like to use some variation on that for Savage Worlds in lieu of the existing wound penalty system (which is a cumulative -1 to EVERY roll you might make while you're wounded).

Ahem.  But I digress.  This is about the MINIATURE, right?  Right.  Anyway, it's a big plastic nasty alien earthworm type of monster that looks like it would work nicely not only for Call of Cthulhu type adventures, but also as a smaller "Rattler" in Deadlands, some sort of alien adversary for my IMEF troopers to take on, a blighted dragonspawn horror for Iron Kingdoms, and a lot more.    It's also fairly simple and solid construction for a large "Bonesium" model from Reaper (far less fiddly than, say, Khanjira the World-Breaker).  Also, after playing through "Dry Rock Gulch" (Fallout 4, "Nuka World DLC"), and picking up a few Ertl "Cow Town" Wild West building facades, I find myself coming up with yet ANOTHER scenario idea....

 

As far as painting went, I basically painted the worm up with Graphite Gray, dry-brushed the "fleshy" areas with Dolphin Gray, dry-brushed the "hard shell" areas with Thicket Green, then went in and painted the "fleshy" areas with a solid application of Mocha, then washes of Burgundy, Barn Red, and Dyoxazine Purple.  I went back and painted all the claws/barbs/horns Ivory, then Golden Yellow, then gave them a wash of Melted Chocolate, going back and touching up with Golden Yellow again in some of the areas where I thought they turned out a little too brown.  I lined the edges of the claws/barbs/horns with Graphite Gray, and semi-dry-brushed the edges of the "shell" layers with Golden Yellow (which, when painted over the Thicket Green, resulted in a sort of dirty-yellow-to-greenish effect to my eyes); I often use some sort of "off-yellow" for highlighting green areas.

 

The base was painted separately for the most part, done in a lighter Denim Gray as a base, then with alternating washes of Dirty Paint Cup Bottom Grit (not a real paint type -- I just got the goop off the bottom of the painting cup, that's all), dry-brushing with tan or shades of gray (or whatever light-ish mixed color I had on the palette that wasn't fully used up), or washing with various grey-ish, green-ish, or brown-ish grungy bits (or whatever dark-ish color I had on the palette that wasn't fully used up) until it just looked messy and earthy enough to suit my liking; I wanted the colors to tend toward neutral browns and grays, and the dirtier and less solid, the better.

 

If I ever want to use this as an alien adversary for the IMEF troopers in a sci-fi setting, I suppose I could fairly easily pop the whole thing off of its integral base, and construct some "industrial wreckage" for it to be bursting out of instead (with bits of "granny grating," wires, guitar-string cable, and random techno-bits from the "bitz box" thrown in for good measure).

Edited by Jordan Peacock
corrected "Thistle Green" to "Thicket Green"
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I like it!

The green is a different approach, very cool!

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This calls for a sanity check! This is certainly a scene of investigators failure!

 

nice work. 

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1 hour ago, Glitterwolf said:

I like it!

The green is a different approach, very cool!

 

Thanks!  One idea I was toying with, but was worried about whether I'd just ruin the work I've done so far, was to try adding some sort of "dribble" to the gaping horrific mouth.  My first thought was to go with some hot glue, which cools to be whitish-to-semi-translucent, which MIGHT give something of the desired effect, and it "strings out" in a way that might work for me ... or might work AGAINST me, depending.  Another thought was to get some sort of "water effects," and get some sort of really fine thread to needle into some of the fang tips, then dribble some "water effects" on it -- but I've never really tried anything like that before, so I'm not sure what material would work best, or what the best process is.  (I imagine it might be something that would require multiple applications to get the "dribbles" up to the size I want, and to have distinct "gobs" versus just a uniform glaze along the thread.)

 

Would you happen to know of any similar projects or "how-to" threads that I might look to for inspiration along those lines?

 

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