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Sophie was taken

77167: Ingrid, Gnome Thief (LTPK part 2)

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Looks great!

 

One nice trick to paint shadows in red.

Use a green wash.

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4 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

Use a green wash.

 

Really? I will have to try that!

I just painted her last week, I love this mini. You kept all the metal details too! I lost all my little bronze accents and I was too frustrated to repaint them! Great job!

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DKS Sculpt? They usually have really well defined eyes. 

 

 

Well painted. 

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47 minutes ago, TheMandolin said:

 

Really? I will have to try that!

I just painted her last week, I love this mini. You kept all the metal details too! I lost all my little bronze accents and I was too frustrated to repaint them! Great job!

 

If you look at my index of painted minis, then go to Busts and look at the WIP for Countess Karnstein.

Somewhere in the last few pages I repainted the red cape and used a green in the shadows.

It is a trick @ub3r_n3rd told me.

 

You will have to highlight after that but it will create more depth.

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9 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

One nice trick to paint shadows in red.

Use a green wash.

I’ll have to try that out sometime. 

 

Curiously, this kit had no green, requiring the user to mix blue and yellow. Pregenerated greens would probably work better though...

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Just now, Sophie was taken said:

I’ll have to try that out sometime. 

 

Curiously, this kit had no green, requiring the user to mix blue and yellow. Pregenerated greens would probably work better though...

 

These tricks are not in the LTPK.

 

If you look at the WIP from my Countess you can also see the way I did stoneworks.

I learned that from @knarthex, at first it looks like a mess, but it turns out great.

 

Every forumite has his or her tricks and we learn from each other.

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20 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

f you look at the WIP from my Countess

 

Side note: two years too late, she's beautiful!

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23 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

 

These tricks are not in the LTPK.

 

If you look at the WIP from my Countess you can also see the way I did stoneworks.

I learned that from @knarthex, at first it looks like a mess, but it turns out great.

 

Every forumite has his or her tricks and we learn from each other.

 

And y’all have the best tricks to steal try and emulate!

 

On the other hand, very few forumites come with illustrated four-panel comics. ::P:

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You can also highlight Red with flesh tones for an interesting effect. 

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Purple in the shadows! Purple is love. But if the base color is purple, I may shade with green or blue, lol. 

 

I'll put purple in the shadows of red, yellow, orange, green, blue.... yeah. I like purple.

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5 hours ago, Sophie was taken said:

If you use green or purple, can you still use yellow to highlight or would it look weird?

 

I highlight reds with orange mixed with red up to orange.

Yellow is too much imho, but others might say otherwise.

We all have our preferences.

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The first two learn to paint kits are meant to be accessible to completely novice painters, so I did not throw in complications like using contrasting colour theory since there's already a lot in there to learn for those who are completely new.

 

You did a great job with this, good work!

Your shadows on the cloak are not too dark at all. Contrast between dark shadows and lighter highlights is essential on miniature figures to make them look fully three dimensional and more interesting to the viewer. It is a near constant refrain of feedback to tell people that they need more contrast (or chant 'deeper shadows, lighter highlights'). ;->

What you don't like is that you can see a stark transition line between the medium red and the dark red. Blending a perfectly smooth transition from dark to light (or one colour to another colour) is one of those things that takes practice. Every paint colour can be a little different, and it takes some experience to learn the techniques that best work for you, and how best to use them.

 

Using the techniques from the paint kit, what would work is to mix the two colours together - the middle red and the darkest red. Then apply that along the line to soften the look of it. It might take a few coats since it's red and red can be on the transparent side.

To avoid seeing more of that during the painting process, you can either thin the paints a little more, or mix more transition steps between your darkest and lightest colours. Or both. It is also important to make sure that each successively layer leaves part of the previous layer showing, so you're painting the darker shadows (or lighter highlights) into an ever smaller area. Kind of like a bullseye.  

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