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mwhowell2001

Wargames using reaper figs

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I recently discovered that I can use Reaper figs for games like Frost Grave.  What other games allow me to field any figs that I want?  I like being able to pick out my own stuff from Reaper.  Thanks ahead of time for helping a wargaming newbie out.

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Ones that come to mind off the top of my head... 

 

- Warlord

- The Ninth Age (a continuation of Games Workshop's Warhammer Fantasy Battles that effectively ignores Age of Sigmar and the nuking of the story that AoS brought about) 

- Dungeons and Dragons

- Pathfinder

- most pen and paper RPGs... ^_^;;;

 

I suspect there are plenty more that other forum members will be mentioning over time :) 

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It should be noted that in friendly games, there aren't many games that force you to use the official figures.  Tournaments and company-supported games are a bit different (I seem to remember that Reaper's Warlord Tournaments back in the day required Reaper's figures, although there was quite a liberal proxy policy that any Reaper figure could be used, as long as the base size was correct).  Something like Privateer Press' Warmachine/Hordes is a bit more difficult just owing to the aesthetics of the miniatures, and I thought data cards were provided with their miniatures as a play-aid (rules reference summary).

 

That said:

 

Mantic Kings of War has a very open policy of using whatever figures you want for your armies - They want you to play the game, and don't much care which minis you use.

 

Any of Osprey Games can be played - Frostgrave, as you've mentioned, but also Rogue Stars, Dragon Rampant, Scrappers, Kobolds & Cobblestones, Men Who Would Be Kings, Black Ops, etc.

 

Song of Blades & Heroes

Fear & Faith

Dead Man's Hand

Legends of the Old West

.45 Adventures

Chaos In Cairo

 

There's really no limit, as I said, beyond the old WizKids click games.  The list would be a lot shorter if you had asked "which games do not allow other company's miniatures to be used for their official games."  Because in the dustbin of history I used non-GW miniatures in my GW games, but I never played tournaments.

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I recently got Dragon Rampant by Osprey games.  Seems very cool to me and totally generic.  You could even use it as a skirmish game if you just fielded individual powerful figures as units.  Worth checking out.

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1 hour ago, japenny_902 said:

I recently got Dragon Rampant by Osprey games.  Seems very cool to me and totally generic.  You could even use it as a skirmish game if you just fielded individual powerful figures as units.  Worth checking out.

 

I have several DR armies using only Reaper figures.

 

Sellswords & Spellslingers is another one.

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I don't think Ghost Archipelago, the sister rules to Frostgrave, have been mentioned yet, so I will add that.

 

I run a crew composed almost entirely of Reaper minis. (One is Wargames Foundry)

 

 

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On 4/11/2018 at 2:00 AM, Doug's Workshop said:

Any of Osprey Games can be played - Frostgrave, as you've mentioned, but also Rogue Stars, Dragon Rampant, Scrappers, Kobolds & Cobblestones, Men Who Would Be Kings, Black Ops, etc.

 

Song of Blades & Heroes

Fear & Faith

Dead Man's Hand

Legends of the Old West

.45 Adventures

Chaos In Cairo

 

 

So DW brings up a point here, which is that there are other genres than fantasy. .45 Adventures, for example, is a "pulp" game, so there are certainly enough Chronoscope and related figures to fill out a game, enough cowboys etc. to staff an Old West game, and enough science fiction figures to staff some larger SF skirmish games.  

 

But my question is whether you have any thoughts about the kind of game you want to play.  Of the fantasy games recommended, I personally have, play, and enjoy at least Song of Blades and Heroes, Frostgrave, Ghost Archipelago (a Frostgrave variant, essentially), Dragon Rampant, and Hordes of the Things.  

 

Song and the two Frostgrave games are all "skirmish" games, using small numbers of figures representing single people/creatures/things, having weapons ranges and scenery which are somewhat in scale with the figures, and representing fairly short periods of time.  They all default to a 3x3 table, although nothing keeps you from expanding if additional time and space are available.

 

Hordes of the Things, on the other hand, is an abstracted ("zoomed out") mass battle game, where we might be representing an entire battle on a 3x3 foot table using 24 multiple figure stands of figures, each with 3-8 figures on it, each stand representing some abstract but large (1000?) number of warriors.  With that, the scenery is similarly abstract, so that a large town might be represented by a couple of buildings on a 6" base, and a forest by a couple of trees on a similar base. Archery range might be 3" (80mm actually), which is about two man-heights compared to your figures.  

 

Dragon Rampant is somewhere in the middle.  Each player might have 4-6 units of a dozen infantry or six cavalry, which are played as though they were individuals, but are abstract enough that the game feels ok if you visualize the units as companies of up to a hundred or so warriors.  Weapons ranges are 12-18", time is abstracted, and you don't fight through the rooms of individual buildings.

 

So picking them is a matter of taste, and is influenced by questions like :

 

a) How much space can you find to play?

b) Will you be able to play all day, or does a game need to fit in after dinner on a work night?

c) How many figures do you expect to paint? (and, do you want to get started with the game when the first handfuls are done rather than waiting for more?)

d) Big battles or desperate little skirmishes? (One can play around with bases so that figures can be used in more than one game in which base sizes are important...)

e) Do you have other people around to play with, and what are they playing? (I'm lucky enough to be in a very flexible group with Chris Palmer of about 20 players; finding an opponent is seldom a problem.)

 

In the long run, investments in figures and scenery pay off.  Modeling can be used for multiple games, and can last for decades.  I've got figures that have been in my forces for over 40 years, and a great bulk of them for 20 or more.  Most of those have seen action in multiple rules sets at multiple battle scales (from roleplaying and skirmish up to mass battles).  Rules are cheap by comparison, and trying out a new set isn't too much of an expense compared to gathering the forces and scenery.  

 

Welcome to the hobby!  Please ask any other questions that occur to you!

 

My brother jumped out of this picture for some reason, but this was from Christmas this past year.  We had a game with old D&D group (friends since the mi-1970s) plus three of the available sons, using the Ral Partha Chaos Wars rules and maybe 400 or so figures (many of which have been in service for decades).  That's another discussion, but the upper limits of a practical game are way up there...

IMGP5453.thumb.JPG.d08ac3bb17dfba6e7fec5fb5d1cadda4.JPG

 

 

 

 

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Here is a listing from my blog with just some of the Wild West game rules that are out there. I need to update it with a few others now. I should get moving on that.

 

Wild West Game Rules

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I'd like to recommend a little set of skirmish rules from an Australian company called Sword & Board Games. I believe it's called Twelve Elements of War. It's a really nice little skirmish rules set. There are no racial factions. Instead each faction welcomes embers of all races (so you can use whichever miniatures you want). The factions tend to be guilds (the Miner's Guild, a guild of evil sorcerers and their brainwashed minions etc). The rules are simple and flow really well while also allowing for some quite clever ploys and include a good campaign system as well. The Twelve Elements referred to are twelve different schools of magic that spellcasters can use. Every faction favours one school of magic and certain races prefer particular elements but it is  only a preference.

Edited by Balgin Stondraeg
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On 4/11/2018 at 10:55 AM, paintybeard said:

I've also used Reaper figures for "Hordes of the Things".

 

You just gave me a massive nostalgia flashback.  :wub:

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4 hours ago, Jeneki said:

 

You just gave me a massive nostalgia flashback.  :wub:

 

Oh? It’s still a good game; my kids were raised on it, so it’s in the position of being something of the family default fantasy game (though we still play in budget friendly 1/72 scale even though they are now out in the world with income). If you haven’t  had it out lately, you should dust it off...::D:

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