Jump to content

Froggy the Great

Randomness XIV: THE FLOOR IS LAVA!

Recommended Posts

56 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

Earl Grey isn't my go-to, but English Breakfast is in the morning. Usually I just have one scoop of raw sugar in it. However, moving to sea level means that my water will be hotter. I think I will adopt adding cream to my tea in the morning because it is tasty and will help cool it down for drinking.

 

We anticipate your arrival at altitudes with oxygen.  There is a lot to be said for the sort of kettle that allows the temperature to be set.  Sea level boiling temp will do unpleasant things to tea and coffee - it won't just be too hot, it will be bitter as well.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ever had your hands run off and make dinner, without consulting your brain?

 

Grabbed some chicken and chopped it into big chunks, tossed it in balsamic vinaigrette, browned it in a skillet, grabbed some spinach, tossed it with some of the same vinaigrette, steamed it just briefly, then tossed it with some ricotta, and tossed it again, along with the chicken, and served it over rice.

 

Came out well, but at no time did my brain enter into it.

 

The Auld Grump

  • Haha 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, kitchen_wolf said:

 

We anticipate your arrival at altitudes with oxygen.  There is a lot to be said for the sort of kettle that allows the temperature to be set.  Sea level boiling temp will do unpleasant things to tea and coffee - it won't just be too hot, it will be bitter as well.

 

True. I do have a kettle with multiple settings. I will have to see what is ideal. Black tea should be more okay with boiling, but not the white or green teas. I don't mind slight bitter, but scalded can be too much.

 

Then again, morning tea is not my good tea. Morning tea just needs to be tea. Liptons however never counts as tea. Eww. 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TheAuldGrump said:

Hmmm, Sam's mom and dad want me to explain Dip painting to them - Sam has been trying, and failing, to explain what she wants. (I think that they are having a small problem connecting Minwax and Miniatures. ::P: )

Talked them through it on the phone.

 

Sure enough, it was the Minwax (Antique Walnut) that they were having a problem with - Sam remembered it perfectly - they just didn't quite believe her. ::P:

 

And here I thought that everyone knows the Dip method. (Want to paint a lot of figures, fast? Want to teach kids how to get decent looking results, without going crazy? Have a whole bunch of Bones sitting in your Mountain of ShameTM? Then the Dip Method is your friend.)

 

I think that they will be surprised with the results - and it may even get them back into miniatures wargaming.

 

The Auld Grump

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chaoswolf said:

Coffee, and tea, and musical instruments, oh my!

We of the Random know how to party my fine canine friend.

Edited by Erifnogard
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

 

True. I do have a kettle with multiple settings. I will have to see what is ideal. Black tea should be more okay with boiling, but not the white or green teas. I don't mind slight bitter, but scalded can be too much.

 

Then again, morning tea is not my good tea. Morning tea just needs to be tea. Liptons however never counts as tea. Eww. 

 

There is nothing like getting the Lipton's teabag into the cup, filling it with water, then nuking it for three minutes - or until it boils over - and then letting it steep for ten minutes.... (I didn't say it was good, just that there is nothing like it....)

 

*EDIT* Not my method, in case anyone wonders - I am of the 'boil the water, put some of the hot water in the cup to heat it up, pour out that water, put the leaves in the cup, then pour the water over the tea - steeping until you like the color' school of tea making... when I have the time.

 

The Auld Grump - if not for Megan, I would forgo coffee completely, in favor of actual tea.

Edited by TheAuldGrump
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't drink coffee at all and will only make tea with a teabag if I'm desperate.  I prefer good quality loose leaf tea and am willing to pay for it.

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, kitchen_wolf said:

 

We anticipate your arrival at altitudes with oxygen.  There is a lot to be said for the sort of kettle that allows the temperature to be set.  Sea level boiling temp will do unpleasant things to tea and coffee - it won't just be too hot, it will be bitter as well.

 

20 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

 

True. I do have a kettle with multiple settings. I will have to see what is ideal. Black tea should be more okay with boiling, but not the white or green teas. I don't mind slight bitter, but scalded can be too much.

 

Then again, morning tea is not my good tea. Morning tea just needs to be tea. Liptons however never counts as tea. Eww. 

 

I am of the other persuasion: A kettle must boil before you use it to make tea, and if you are using a teapot for a full and satisfying "brew" then it must be rinsed out with hot water first.

The teapot should then should be allowed to draw for a few minutes, but don't stir the contents. (That is what makes the unpleasant bitter taste.)

Oh, and kettles with different temperature settings are a vexing, unnecessary complication, I think.

And Lipton's real name is "Floor sweepings".

  • Like 3
  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

 

True. I do have a kettle with multiple settings. I will have to see what is ideal. Black tea should be more okay with boiling, but not the white or green teas. I don't mind slight bitter, but scalded can be too much.

 

Then again, morning tea is not my good tea. Morning tea just needs to be tea. Liptons however never counts as tea. Eww. 

Yorkshire Gold  is a fine tea for the morning. ::):

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Erifnogard said:

I don't drink coffee at all and will only make tea with a teabag if I'm desperate.  I prefer good quality loose leaf tea and am willing to pay for it.

 

Fine loose leaf is a great thing, but I wait until I am awake to appreciate it. Bonus: there are multiple loose leaf tea shops a short bus ride from where I'll be living. Yay!

 

4 minutes ago, paintybeard said:

 

 

I am of the other persuasion: A kettle must boil before you use it to make tea, and if you are using a teapot for a full and satisfying "brew" then it must be rinsed out with hot water first.

The teapot should then should be allowed to draw for a few minutes, but don't stir the contents. (That is what makes the unpleasant bitter taste.)

Oh, and kettles with different temperature settings are a vexing, unnecessary complication, I think.

And Lipton's real name is "Floor sweepings".

 

I think this method is called Outstandingly British. The settings on my kettle are quite easy and add no complications. 

  • Like 6
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As an aside - used loose leaf tea, dried out afterwards, is great for making leafy duff when basing miniatures.

 

***

 

Sam's father is thinking about getting back into mini painting - which led to Sam trying to describe how she painted his old Chaos Dwarfs - which look better than the ones he painted when he was gaming. ::):

 

The Auld Grump - Andrew getting back into miniature gaming may mean Jamie getting into miniature gaming - both are already role playing gamers, and have been for twenty plus years.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that this may have been mentioned on the forums before - not safe for work, not safe for grandmothers, not safe with your wife/girlfriend/significant other - though she may also find it funnier than you did....

 

My Elf Girlfriend.

 

The Auld Grump

  • Like 3
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kitchen_wolf said:

 

We anticipate your arrival at altitudes with oxygen.  There is a lot to be said for the sort of kettle that allows the temperature to be set.  Sea level boiling temp will do unpleasant things to tea and coffee - it won't just be too hot, it will be bitter as well.

 

Tannins in tea come from longer steeping, Any one who didn't believe that needs to try my mother's sun tea. (10 tea bags in 1 gallon of water for three days)  it lasted...a while.  A lot of water was also consumed

 

I like black yea in water brought to a 100 deg boil, rested and steeped for 2.5 minutes.  Your preferences may vary.  My very favorite tea is yunnan gold, but for the cost it may as well be made of it.

 

27 minutes ago, paintybeard said:

 

 

I am of the other persuasion: A kettle must boil before you use it to make tea, and if you are using a teapot for a full and satisfying "brew" then it must be rinsed out with hot water first.

The teapot should then should be allowed to draw for a few minutes, but don't stir the contents. (That is what makes the unpleasant bitter taste.)

Oh, and kettles with different temperature settings are a vexing, unnecessary complication, I think.

And Lipton's real name is "Floor sweepings".

I always thought it was Gaelic for used hay...

  • Like 2
  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And can Monday go play with someone else?  I'm going to spend the rest of the week picking up it's toys....

  • Sad 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheAuldGrump said:

Talked them through it on the phone.

 

Sure enough, it was the Minwax (Antique Walnut) that they were having a problem with - Sam remembered it perfectly - they just didn't quite believe her. ::P:

 

And here I thought that everyone knows the Dip method. (Want to paint a lot of figures, fast? Want to teach kids how to get decent looking results, without going crazy? Have a whole bunch of Bones sitting in your Mountain of ShameTM? Then the Dip Method is your friend.)

 

I think that they will be surprised with the results - and it may even get them back into miniatures wargaming.

 

The Auld Grump

 

I didn't really know about it until a blog post mocked the army painter dip, but....  I dunno, it's rather tempting to look into dip methods for some of my core army guys for my Skaven horde...  Doubly so if it means being able to "chew" through several twenties of units, and just add a bit more.  Heroes and siege weapons will of course get more attention, but there's an idea of "good enough" for stuff like Clanrats... 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×