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4 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

Don't store bread in the fridge. The temperature transitions will cause the humidity in the air inside the bag to condensate, and at best you get soggy bread, and at worst... 

 

That's Chaotic Evil, with monoloogues and Ominous Thunder territory...

 

 

This is true if you let it warm up significantly when you take it out. If you don't, I haven't had any problems with it. Sealing it in the bag helps a lot too. We also put the bread straight from fridge to toaster mitigating any soggyness. 

 

1 hour ago, Gadgetman! said:

If it grows mould in one day you may have a serious problem with your home. 

(Incredibly high humidity or a mould issue)

Either that, or they sell you crappy bread.

 

Or really good bread without any preservatives :wub:

 

Guess that makes me lawful good. We go through bread really slowly so if we don't keep it in the fridge it molds before we eat it all. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches on warm toast are one of the best things ever.

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4 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

Don't store bread in the fridge. The temperature transitions will cause the humidity in the air inside the bag to condensate, and at best you get soggy bread, and at worst... 

 

That's Chaotic Evil, with monoloogues and Ominous Thunder territory...

 

 

 Very dry around here , bread dose just fine in fridge in a high desert. Back when I lived on the coast, humidity was much higher , so bread would only see a fridge in the summer ...

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Kind of the same here.  If I make a loaf in the breadmaker, if it isn't bagged (ziplocked) and put in the fridge I nthe summer, it goes bad in a day. 

 

Loaves from the supermarket will usually last a few days, assuming they don't disappear over the course of a day that is... 

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Gosh...  

And here I take a hike across the road to the local grocery store just before lunch on monday, to pick up a bread and something good to put on it, and that bread will last me the entire week, and even leave a few slices to bring back home on friday afternoon.

(this week I picked up some Nice roastbeef. I already have Remoulade and pickles in the fridge, together with a jar of jam, tube cheese, boxes of sardines and tuna... Or maybe smoked salmon... )   

 

I do know about People who buy 2 or 3 breads at the same time, slice them all up, butter the slices and put cheese or some sort of lunchmeat on them, then bag and put them all in the freezer. Then they have ready-packed lunch for 2 weeks.

Now, where do they fit in the diagram?

 

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Chaotic Neutral but always disguised** as Neutral Good or Lawful Neutral

 

 

**First I twist, and by twist I mean suspend and spin the bag, so that the plastic forms a thin twisted rope;  then one of the two types of clip is applied. 

 

***Twist ties with the wire inside are an unwieldy, unaligned abomination. 

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Doesn't fridging or freezing the bread give it a weird crumbly texture? I never understood putting bread in there due to the texture change (not the soggy one). I get preventing mold, but the texture always seemed ruined to me. 

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1 hour ago, Cyradis said:

Doesn't fridging or freezing the bread give it a weird crumbly texture? I never understood putting bread in there due to the texture change (not the soggy one). I get preventing mold, but the texture always seemed ruined to me. 

 

 

With most bread it does not change much. Actually, most bread that you get at a restaurant or even grocery store has been frozen at some point. The exceptions being the most popular kinds, plain white and wheat bread and buns. Sometimes it is different if the bakery is very close (same town or one over). Freezing (and thawing) usually has little effect on the texture, when done correctly, and ensures that the bread is not crushed in shipping. Any gluten free bread or pita you see has almost certianly been frozen unless you are buying it from the bakery where it was made. 

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