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I recommend green stuff in the tubes, but that's because if you get the ribbon there's a part between the two halves that has cured already. 

 

As for pinning versus greenstuff, I'd say go with both, but that's just how I am - I even pin plastic multi part miniatures now. 

Edited by WhiteWulfe
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While it doesn't help you now, next time cut as close to the sprue as you can and then start clipping off the remainder or shaping it with a file. Always better to go long than to cut to short. I would start with drilling into the arm at approximately the right angle to fit into the socket. Put a blob of paint on the end of the pin and stick it, as close as you can, into the socket to mark the point for drilling into the main body. Drill the hole in the main body slightly wider (if you use paperclips which are excellent fodder for this but require a good sharp cutter), you need two drill bits one that is cutting the right size hole for your metal pin and one that's a bit bigger. I think a #63 drill bit is the right size to fit the paperclip so a #61 would be the other choice. Super glue your pin into the arm, drop a bit of superglue into the hole in the body, then put a blob of greenstuff around your pin to act as both an adhesive and a filler and push the arm into place. The larger hole in the body should allow you enough wiggle room to get everything to fit correctly. It does take a little practice.

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35 minutes ago, WhiteWulfe said:

I recommend green stuff in the tubes, but that's because if you get the ribbon there's a part between the two halves that has cured already. 

 

As for pinning versus greenstuff, I'd say go with both, but that's just how I am - I even pin plastic multi part miniatures now. 

 

How long does green stuff stay good for? 

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27 minutes ago, Goddesstio said:

 

How long does green stuff stay good for? 

 

As long as you store it airtight it will stay good for a very long time.

 

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37 minutes ago, Goddesstio said:

 

How long does green stuff stay good for? 

Those with more experience would say "it depends on how you store it".  Anything I don't intend on using up within 3 months, I have stored in the freezer (I have a whole tube of it in there, plus half of a tube on my desk), while the rest is currently in a ziplock bag as I don't have any spare containers to put the stuff in.  I personally store the two parts in separate bags, within wax paper, just in case, although the method Glitterwolf mentioned is probably easier, because one of the parts really sticks to wax paper, and an airtight container is much more reliable than a ziplock bag. 

 

Usually though, the stuff is good for quite some time, it's just freezing allows it keep its "fresh batch handling" capabilities longer (aka fresh stuff is easier to work with than stuff two years old). 

 

My other putties (Magic Sculpt, and Apoxie Sculpt) I leave in their containers on my desk since they come in containers that can be easily sealed. 

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Storing Greenstuff in the fridge also helps it stay good longer. Also, if you get the ribbon type where the blue and yellow parts are touching cut out the strip where they touch so you have a blue ribbon and a yellow ribbon and store them separately. If you don't it starts to cure along the area where the two colors touch.

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One caveat to pinning with superglue is that that the join can still be weak to rotational shear.  Depending on how the model goes together this might not be an issue, but if it is and you hit your model just right you can cause the piece to rotate around the pin (done it).  This can be mitigated by using a different adhesive such as J-B Kwik Weld, which is not so weak to rotation, or by using baking soda.  JB forms a strong bond but you will have to hold the pieces together for a bit longer than with superglue.  Baking soda reacts with the weak acid in superglue and doubles as a gap filler as long as you don't use too much.  The later is also a handy trick if you put together models and that community has been using it for decades.

 

For myself, I use JB if I'm concerned about it.

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I honestly don't know what I should be concerned about, even. I thought these would be a cute fun figure to paint for my game, and now I'm buying drills and putty. I'm feeling a little overwhelmed. 

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42 minutes ago, Goddesstio said:

I honestly don't know what I should be concerned about, even. I thought these would be a cute fun figure to paint for my game, and now I'm buying drills and putty. I'm feeling a little overwhelmed. 

 

Like I said if you stick with the hobby at all then you will definitely run into times when you will need these things anyways.  Try not to get overwhelmed because that's when you start resenting the hobby and miss out on all the fun and joy that is painting miniatures.

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1 hour ago, NecroMancer said:

 

Like I said if you stick with the hobby at all then you will definitely run into times when you will need these things anyways.  Try not to get overwhelmed because that's when you start resenting the hobby and miss out on all the fun and joy that is painting miniatures.

 

That's really what I'm struggling with right now. I don't even want to paint he minis I do have now, much less go deal with these stupid figures and figuring out drill bit sizes and storing putty I may never use again  and trying to figure out pin sizes and lengths.  Part of me wants to just trash this area of the campaign and toss these stupid figures in the bin and count the $12 as a loss.

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While I am probably the exception, I had only painted a couple of minis before I started pinning.  But because of that, I can tell you it's actually not that bad no matter how confounding it may sound above.  IMO pinning is like most hands-on learning; the best way is just to do it.  You may screw up your first couple of attempts but don't worry about it.  Just like most hobby activities it can take a few tries to get it down.

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Pinning and gluing is my strongest talent, followed by gaming and painting.  I enjoy it immensely.  I watch my friends models fall apart on the gaming table, but mine hold fast.

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Don't let the pinning and putty-ing intimidate you. It just takes a bit of practice. If you mess up pinning you can fix it with putty. Just fill in the drill holes with putty, let it cure and try again. As for worrying about the bit sizes, I just compare my bits to the part I need to pin and pick the one that is the best match. I do the same with picking wire size. I have a three or four sizes of floral wire that I got at a hobby store. They should last for a very long time. The floral wire is very easy to work with and should be fine for all but the largest pinning needs, for example a large metal dragon.

This is a pretty good video on pining. He uses paper clips as pins, which will require hardened wire cutters. Floral wire can be cut with jewelry cutters. The video shows pining on an arm. I use a slightly different version where I hold the pieces together and use a very fine point Sharpie to make marks perpendicular to the pin at the top, bottom, and sides then on then on both parts connect the lines across the pinned surface making a + that marks the center of the pieces to be pinned.

Hope this is helpful and make things seem a bit easier.

 

 

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20 hours ago, WhiteWulfe said:

I recommend green stuff in the tubes, but that's because if you get the ribbon there's a part between the two halves that has cured already. 

 

Good point. The general advice here is to simply pinch off and throw away the middle portion where the blue and green ribbons meet before you mix them up. I do it as I go as opposed to separating the ribbons as soon as I get a new box.

 

Regarding how long green stuff lasts, my experience seemed to be forever, or at least many months before I run out of it. As in, over a year. The box the ribbon version comes in isn't airtight, and I just throw it in my drawer with all my other glue and putty (although I seldom use any other products) as opposed to the refrigerator. YMMV, but I've been using it for years like that without any issues.

 

Don't get discouraged about buying new tools or supplies. Any hobby requires at least a modest investment, and it's only a matter of time before you acquire another multipart mini. Paperclips and GS are pretty cheap; the biggest issue you face is getting the right sized drill bits, which are hobby store and not hardware store items. However, with a little care, they last essentially forever, especially considering the soft materials they are used on. Just use a little candle wax for lube, watch for sideways stress which can break them, and only use a pin vice in your hand as opposed to any rotating power tool. They aren't meant for high speed use.

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I have found hobby sized drill bits in hardware stores. I think they were in the Dremmel section they work fine in a pin vice.

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