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With pinning take your time and go slow, it's just another skill easily learned.  And practice, of course.  I use epoxy for metal minis and super glue for bonesium.  I have had metal minis be dropped and warp or mangle but I have never had a pinned joint break loose.  Yet...

Bones minis were designed for my gaming friends, practically gorilla proof.

Watch a few videos, read a few threads.  It's very doable.

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Ok, I watched a bunch of videos but I'm still having a lot of trouble. I feel like the hole I'm making is way too wide and very shallow. I've got no idea what's going wrong

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That's not really a problem. It can be fixed with GS later. 

(Everyone does that when they first start out)

 

But...

Now you can drill from the outside of the arm, and into the main body, directly, without doing any marking or measuring. Just hold the part up against the body and insert the drill bit... 

 

One tip; when drilling into a thin part, hold it as close to where you're drilling, and you may be able to feel the metal bulge slightly before the bit eats through the skin.

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If you are having trouble gauging the depth one thing you can try is to mark the bit.  Some people will use a marker or a strip of electrical tape wrapped around the bit will work as well.  You will likely learn to judge the distance by eye, but I've seen some old woodworkers that still tape their bits.

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I have done this too. It is totally salvageable.  From the picture, I presume that the pin hasen't been glued yet. If so soak in  some acetone (if you have it on hand) if not, acetone nail polish works well too, especially if you have the salon strength for glitter polishes.

To fix it, first pull the pin out of the part. Then use green stuff or other putty of your choice and fill in the hole. Completely fill the hole, using a small tool or piece of wire. Blend the area where the pin came through the piece to hide the hole. Let the putty cure for 24 hours or so, Then re-drill the part.

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23 minutes ago, Gadgetman! said:

That's not really a problem. It can be fixed with GS later. 

(Everyone does that when they first start out)

 

But...

Now you can drill from the outside of the arm, and into the main body, directly, without doing any marking or measuring. Just hold the part up against the body and insert the drill bit... 

 

One tip; when drilling into a thin part, hold it as close to where you're drilling, and you may be able to feel the metal bulge slightly before the bit eats through the skin.

 

I don't actually need to drill into the main body; she was made with big holes in her body where the arms are supposed to go. They're supposed to have metal nubbins sticking out that go into the holes, but the sprue was kind of messed up and they came off wrong.

 

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3 hours ago, Goddesstio said:

 

I don't actually need to drill into the main body; she was made with big holes in her body where the arms are supposed to go. They're supposed to have metal nubbins sticking out that go into the holes, but the sprue was kind of messed up and they came off wrong.

 

 

I'd still drill and pin on that side, unless the fit is tight. Often the larger holes are pretty bad joints, from my experience. Popping a pin in there will stabilize it. 

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7 minutes ago, Cyradis said:

 

I'd still drill and pin on that side, unless the fit is tight. Often the larger holes are pretty bad joints, from my experience. Popping a pin in there will stabilize it. 

 

I was thinking instead I'd cram some green stuff in the large holes and stab the long bit of the arm pin in it, hoping that when the GS hardens it'll make a strong joint without the drilling? Does that sound like it would work?

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I think the greenstuff will help fill any gaps, but I'm not a fan of its holding power under weight. Perhaps greenstuff a fit, then drill through the greenstuff and into the metal before gluing. 

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