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Lt. Coldfire

03500: Mason Thornwarden, Ranger

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The awesome just keeps on coming. Beautiful paint job on this guy from top to bottom.

This guy has such unusual armor on his legs and left arm. Then there's that quiver. Into the cart he goes. 

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Amazing job!  Looks like you've Photoshopped a base onto a real person!

 

 

  You didn't did you?  ::D:

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Oh, drat. I just started painting this mini; now I have this for comparison! ::o: Well, maybe I can use it as inspiration. :winkthumbs:

Edited by Lostbug
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