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I'll edit this once I switch from my phone to my PC.

 

Edit:

OK, I got these just last week but I wanted to use them at the Origins Game Fair in Columbus, OH, June 14-17, so I got to work the day they arrived and started washing them with dish soap and hot water. I couldn't wait for them to dry so I started designing the layout while they were still wet! :lol:

 

Next day I glued them in place. They are mounted on expanded foam insulation, this particular brand comes in 1/2 inch thickness, 14.5 by 48 inches. It is used to go between 2x4 wall studs, hence the odd width. Any way, it a good size for modular gaming terrain once cut down to 24 inches and doubled up. I used Gorilla brand glue to attache the tiles to the substrate; I knew PVA (Elmers) glue would not stick well to the PVC tiles from trying it on Reaper Bones, and CA (Superglue) glue does not play nice with expanded foam. The Gorilla glue I used dried white; it looks strange against the gray tiles, but as it was all getting painted anyway it did not matter. Two properties of Gorilla glue I had forgotten worked in my favor. First, it requires a little moisture to cure, and so it didn't matter the tiles were not entirely dry after one day. I also used a sponge to dampen the flat underside of all the tiles. Second the glue expands! The tiles don't fit together well and have a lot of gaps, so the expanding glue helped fill in those gaps. I had to go back later and trim some of the excess glue but that was easy with a hobby knife. By the way you might want to use gloves if you're using Gorilla glue; it sticks to skin pretty well, too.

 

After another day of drying I first painted all the exposed foam with black craft paint to protect it from the next step. I then sprayed the piece with Army Painted black primer; the solvents in most spray paints will dissolve expanded foam, and indeed some on this piece was pockmarked even though it was covered in acrylic paint first. After a few hours I then applied the first, heavy "damp" brush of a slate gray interior household paint I picked up on the clearance "oops" rack at Walmart. I used this kind of cheap interior paint to base coat my terrain; it's cheap and durable, but it takes longer to dry and does not cover as well if not applied heavily. Hence the "damp" brush instead of a true dry brush. Once that was cured I followed up with some dry brushed dolphin gray craft paint. I then used Reaper brown wash to paint all the wood and metal rails. I lightly stippled the rails with some silver paint and then did a second, lighter dry brush with the dolphin gray. The next day I mixed some black and brown craft paint and made a wash, and used some Reaper Red, Green and Blue liners to add some variation to the stone. Once all that dried I then applied a final, very light dry brush of a cream color.

 

There is more I'd like to do to this piece, like add some lighting and the mine carts that came with the SW KS reward, and filling in some more gaps in the walls, but I think this will do for now. And I have almost half of my reward left yet for another piece.

 

I really like these tiles; I see me buying more soon. Well done, MisterJustin and Secret Weapon Minis.

 

 

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Edited by DocPiske
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Thanks! I have some experience make terrain, so there are few tricks to make it go faster.

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I use big brushes and craft paint, myself.  I've been going through some 3D printed caverns while I wait for the Mines.

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Looks great! Well done! Please keep us updated if you go back later and add more details or accessories. 

 

As a side note, why glue it all down? The loss of modularity would be concerning for me.

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Great looking mine, but I'm also curious about why you glued them down with such strong glue. Wouldn't something like poster tac or a dot of hot glue held them in place while allowing you to rearrange the set more easily later? 

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I've tried modular dungeons before and found they were a pain to transport, set up and keep in place during a game. I find fixed, general use pieces to be more practical.  I tend to only use a given piece a few times in the course of a campaign, so I'd rather just build a selection of set pieces. I have more pieces made using Hirst Art blocks that I should create show off threads for.

 

As for using Gorilla glue, it actually peals off the PVC with only moderate effort, unlike CA which is basically "unbreakable" on PVC. I say that with the caveat that with freezing the piece and using strong tools you can pull apart PVC glued with CA, but you might damage the plastic. I hadn't thought of using a hot glue gun. I'm not sure that wouldn't melt the expanded foam substrate.

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You can drill little holes at oposed angles to help gorilla glue grip plastics ... I have built a few pieces using pvc 'found' with a backhoe and the pipe was stressed to fracture in such an organic way I had to turn it into some ruptured pipe lines ... a few holes near the mounted end and a few in the wood base and it turned out very strong ... I used the same trick in the cake pillars in terrain thread.

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