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Kangaroorex

Darksword red dragon for Reapercon

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4 hours ago, Kangaroorex said:

One thing I haven't found is an opaque bright red.  Wonder if there is something about the pigment that wont let it work.  I usually try to move 1 step darker then I want and add a drop of pure white to get some opacity, but it washes out the redness pretty quickly.

 

Have you tried 09094 Clear Red? It's just red pigment so it might work for you. I use its sister colour 09095 Clear Yellow for super bright yellow basecoats.

Edited by Kuroneko
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I will have to try that.  most of the clears i have used are very transparent.  (mainly magenta, blue and purple) but its worth a try!

 

Hopefully i will get time to work on the dragon again tonight!

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I did get some painting done today.  Ya gotta touch something on a mini that large and my handle as it were, was the pile of stones under his left front paw.  In the process we lost a good deal of paint on that paw so it needed serious touch up.  While I was at it I used some clear red to brighten a few spots that had gotten muddled and then further brightened up all the highlights.... and caught another 3 or 4 pinholes.  I don't know where they come from

 

And yes, clear red is completely transparent as I thought.  It still makes a really nice time adjustment.

 

For pics this time I did bring in my working spot to show off the eyes and the highlights to full effect.

 

Ollie also snuck in to the frame for a cameo.  Hope you like them.  Anyway, comments and critique are appreciated

20180730_222114.thumb.jpg.18d2494ef09afb766693fcf5a79a2023.jpg

20180730_222232.thumb.jpg.15f4c74d636aae3b4e78b834577b3fa9.jpg

Edited by Kangaroorex
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That is one nice resin dragon.  I sort of balked at it being resin, but I've slowly been getting used to better resin than what turned me away in the past.  This particular dragon is absolutely gorgeous, and you're doing a great job! 

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2 hours ago, lowlylowlycook said:

Nice work so far.  I like the little one!

Thanks, I liked Ollie, he's been a great help in testing new ideas and techniques!  hes also a well bathed dragon, having 2 dips in the simple green during this adventure!

 

2 hours ago, buglips*the*goblin said:

That is one nice resin dragon.  I sort of balked at it being resin, but I've slowly been getting used to better resin than what turned me away in the past.  This particular dragon is absolutely gorgeous, and you're doing a great job! 

Resin still isn't my favorite medium, too much waste and often too many mold lines, sometimes in the worst possible places.  this miniature didn't suffer from my biggest complaint:  The primer actually stuck to the resin the first time and doesn't flake off badly, something I find common in most resin.  he is also a really powerful sculpt.  I have had a really good time painting him!

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Beatiful dragon! I especially enjoy the bony plates and their contrast with the red.

To answer your question about opaque bright red.
I know of only a couple opaque red pigments in artist grade paint, the most famous (and most used) ones are Cadmiums (which are poisonous).
Historically (currently available from limited paint manufactures at exorbitant prices) Vermilion and Minium were used.  Minium is based on lead (poisonous) while vermilion is mercuric sulfide (poisonous). 
Minium is an orangy red, vermilion is the epitomy of red and cadmium can be most reds from the orange to dark. 

Napthol Red family can also be semi opaque but it varies based on type (with lightfastness being different between napthol reds).

 

Personaly for an opaque bright red I would recommend Cadmium Red Light (PR 108) from an artist grade paint (not a hue, a hue is a mixture of pigments and in most cases it lacks the opacity of cadmium).
If you want to check the opacity of artist grade paints you can always go to the website of the manufacture,  they normally have swatches (these swatches show the paint: as a glaze, straight from the tube and tinted with white), and information on which pigments the paint contains. For detailed information on opacity I would recommend checking Golden paints website and looking at the reds in the heavy body range (clicking on the picture and then expanding the techinqual information should give the opacity).

 

Further reading on red pigments can be found on: http://www.artiscreation.com/red.html#.W2QeGC17Gu4

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Awsome looking dragon.. He got a really old and cruel look to his face, and the red color and cold blue eyes fits right into this..

I gotta paint a dragon at some point! 

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On 7/31/2018 at 4:31 PM, Kangaroorex said:

Thanks, I liked Ollie, he's been a great help in testing new ideas and techniques!  hes also a well bathed dragon, having 2 dips in the simple green during this adventure!

 

Resin still isn't my favorite medium, too much waste and often too many mold lines, sometimes in the worst possible places.  this miniature didn't suffer from my biggest complaint:  The primer actually stuck to the resin the first time and doesn't flake off badly, something I find common in most resin.  he is also a really powerful sculpt.  I have had a really good time painting him!

 

Yeah, I ALWAYS plan to wash a resin piece at least once, before attempting to assemble and/or paint.  I think 99% of the mold release agents they use when making resin will repel acrylic paints.  I have a love/hate relationship with resin.  It holds detail great and usually goes together fairly well and it's light.  Dealing with mold release is a pain, and you have to be careful when sanding and filing cause the dust is usually toxic and you should avoid breathing in the dust at all costs.  Dealing with pinhole bubbles is a pain as well, although I haven't seen that in a while.  It seems most people have stepped up their casting and that's a problem that was a lot more common 10+ years ago.  

 

Anyway, love what you're doing with this guy and look forward to watching him progress!

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On 7/30/2018 at 10:39 AM, Kangaroorex said:

One thing I haven't found is an opaque bright red.  Wonder if there is something about the pigment that wont let it work.  I usually try to move 1 step darker then I want and add a drop of pure white to get some opacity, but it washes out the redness pretty quickly.

 

Cadmium reds are pretty opaque, though they're a bit harder to find in acrylic paints because of toxicity worries. (Don't eat your paint, folks, it's not just cadmium pigments that are toxic.) Note that "Cadmium Red Hue" is not a cadmium red, it's a replacement with lower toxicity and poorer performance.

 

There's also a new line of cadmium pigment replacements that Liquitex has brought out to pretty good response. (Look for "Cadmium-Free", which seems to be the trade name.) I haven't tried them, but I've seen videos sponsored by Liquitex that seem to show excellent performance.

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7 hours ago, DragonWyrm said:

Beatiful dragon! I especially enjoy the bony plates and their contrast with the red.

To answer your question about opaque bright red.
I know of only a couple opaque red pigments in artist grade paint, the most famous (and most used) ones are Cadmiums (which are poisonous).
Historically (currently available from limited paint manufactures at exorbitant prices) Vermilion and Minium were used.  Minium is based on lead (poisonous) while vermilion is mercuric sulfide (poisonous). 
Minium is an orangy red, vermilion is the epitomy of red and cadmium can be most reds from the orange to dark. 

Napthol Red family can also be semi opaque but it varies based on type (with lightfastness being different between napthol reds).

 

Personaly for an opaque bright red I would recommend Cadmium Red Light (PR 108) from an artist grade paint (not a hue, a hue is a mixture of pigments and in most cases it lacks the opacity of cadmium).
If you want to check the opacity of artist grade paints you can always go to the website of the manufacture,  they normally have swatches (these swatches show the paint: as a glaze, straight from the tube and tinted with white), and information on which pigments the paint contains. For detailed information on opacity I would recommend checking Golden paints website and looking at the reds in the heavy body range (clicking on the picture and then expanding the techinqual information should give the opacity).

 

Further reading on red pigments can be found on: http://www.artiscreation.com/red.html#.W2QeGC17Gu4

 

Thanks @DragonWyrm  that was a real eye opener.  Paint is one of those things I tend to use and not think about.  I had always thought that opaques were created using a heavy tint and something like a titanium white to provide the opacity and then a darker pigment was used to counter the white (or ochre if you were shooting for a yellow-red)  This is an excellent summary. I will have to see if I can find some Cadmium Red Light for future projects.  It is nice to know that I am not missing something by being unable to find an opaque red in the reaper or Vallejo lines

 

Thanks also for the complement on the dragon.  There has been a lot of time and effort spent with that piece over the last few months ::D:.  I have liked the contrasting reds on the different scales and the skin, it provides so much more interest to the model.

 

5 hours ago, LarsM said:

Awsome looking dragon.. He got a really old and cruel look to his face, and the red color and cold blue eyes fits right into this..

I gotta paint a dragon at some point! 

I am glad you like him.  I'm a real fan of the eyes.  considering how small they are they really stand out on the dragon and almost seem to glow on their own. Dragons are a lot of fun to paint, there is a lot of room for personalization and expression.  With over 50 of them in my display cases, I might be biased though ::):.  Right now I am working on the stones and trying to decide if he's inside (raw stone) or outside (moss and grass)  I very much to have the stone pile with a paint that seems to be peeling away due to age but I don't know if I can pull it off.  my usual techniques for this require a much larger surface and I don't want to mess up the dragon trying to improve the base.

 

 

1 hour ago, Mckenna35 said:

 

Yeah, I ALWAYS plan to wash a resin piece at least once, before attempting to assemble and/or paint.  I think 99% of the mold release agents they use when making resin will repel acrylic paints.  I have a love/hate relationship with resin.  It holds detail great and usually goes together fairly well and it's light.  Dealing with mold release is a pain, and you have to be careful when sanding and filing cause the dust is usually toxic and you should avoid breathing in the dust at all costs.  Dealing with pinhole bubbles is a pain as well, although I haven't seen that in a while.  It seems most people have stepped up their casting and that's a problem that was a lot more common 10+ years ago.  

 

Anyway, love what you're doing with this guy and look forward to watching him progress!

 

For me, resin still has its problems.  Resin tends to have a lot more mold lines.  I spent a lot of time on this guy filling in gaps and small fills in the resin, though not as much as there used to be.  As for release agent, this one got washed in simple green 2x and alcohol once.  that seemed to allow primer to stick pretty well.  I have also learned to use brush on primer rather than spray on because sometimes you can get a skin to form on resin where the primer looks good but its actually just a peel off skin that peels up with the slightest scratch.  That can be really disappointing!

 

Next up is the base and what to do with the rocks.  need to be careful here because I don't want to destroy what I have already done!  Thank you for the complement on the dragon, I'm looking forward to getting closer to the finish line.

 

1 hour ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

Cadmium reds are pretty opaque, though they're a bit harder to find in acrylic paints because of toxicity worries. (Don't eat your paint, folks, it's not just cadmium pigments that are toxic.) Note that "Cadmium Red Hue" is not a cadmium red, it's a replacement with lower toxicity and poorer performance.

 

There's also a new line of cadmium pigment replacements that Liquitex has brought out to pretty good response. (Look for "Cadmium-Free", which seems to be the trade name.) I haven't tried them, but I've seen videos sponsored by Liquitex that seem to show excellent performance.

The brush licking thing is a harder habit to kick than you think! 

I need to go looking for the opaque reds and see if they water down to something I can actually use!

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13 minutes ago, Kangaroorex said:

The brush licking thing is a harder habit to kick than you think! 

 

Try painting with enamels for a bit. It won't take forgetting more than once or twice to cure that.

 

:zombie:

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31 minutes ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

Try painting with enamels for a bit. It won't take forgetting more than once or twice to cure that.

 

:zombie:

If it were that easy, I would have.  I have some weird taste buds, enamels are strangely sweet.  Right now I am using the scale 75 paints to wean myself off the whole licking  the points sharp.  I have no idea what is in those but it tastes awful.  it does work well as a reminder to not taste! 

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