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Rigel

Chunky robot bits, advice wanted!

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So I'm trying to make a bathysphere robot model from scraps and green stuff. The scraps are trivial, but I'm finding the sculpting difficult. I want to make chunky, clunky industrial-looking claws and feet for the 'bot, but I'm having trouble getting green stuff to form nice squared corners and edges. Should I be letting stuff harden and then slicing it with a craft blade? Squishing it into greased-up square molds when it's pliable but not stretchy? Filing off lumps and round bits? I'm very new to sculpting with green stuff, and while organic and random forms aren't too bad, industrial and precise shapes are giving me grief. 
 

Here's what we got so far: 
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If you have any robot-sculpting  advice, I'd love to hear it!

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Greenstuff's not ideal for hard, sharp edges.Generally the best bet is to work it into shape as much as possible, then after about an hour's curing time, start to polish and sharpen the edges (with a flat Clay Shaper, ideally). Just keep at it while it continues to cure.

Alternatively, you can slice the cured putty with a very sharp blade, but you don't always get a clean surface.

Much easier though is to start with a putty like Milliput, which can be carved, sanded and filed after curing.

 

Here's a link to a robot I made from Milliput and Greenstuff, if you fancy a look: http://leadadventureforum.com/index.php?topic=42600

 

cheers,

Michael 

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Milliput or Magic Sculpt are both better choices for clean and sharp edges. Greenstuff will never develop a completely sharp and even surface.

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19 hours ago, SisterMaryNapalm said:

 

Milliput or Magic Sculpt are both better choices for clean and sharp edges. Greenstuff will never develop a completely sharp and even surface.

Thank you! I'll try to hunt them down this weekend. 

 

21 hours ago, Lovejoy said:

Greenstuff's not ideal for hard, sharp edges.Generally the best bet is to work it into shape as much as possible, then after about an hour's curing time, start to polish and sharpen the edges (with a flat Clay Shaper, ideally). Just keep at it while it continues to cure.

Alternatively, you can slice the cured putty with a very sharp blade, but you don't always get a clean surface.

Much easier though is to start with a putty like Milliput, which can be carved, sanded and filed after curing.

 

Here's a link to a robot I made from Milliput and Greenstuff, if you fancy a look: http://leadadventureforum.com/index.php?topic=42600

 

cheers,

Michael 

Thank you, and that is a glorious bot/mech! The step-by-step is inspiring and beautiful. 

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Blend some Aves Apoxy Sculpt into your greenstuff, about a 40% Aves to 60% green ratio. Milliput can be filed and cured like ceramic but is pretty toxic and a huge pain to mix. Magic Sculpt on its own is a bit brittle. Greenstuff + Aves gives you the best of both worlds: edge retention, longer work time than straight green, plus a little flexibility in the finished piece. Sculpt the pieces into the shapes you want and keep going back and working the edges as they cure. After the epoxy completely sets up you can file it with hobby files or sand it with fine grit sandpaper (think finishing grades). I do a lot of sideways scraping with a dull exacto blade when I am working cured epoxy into shape, but do what seems natural to you. A dust mask may be a good idea as you will be kicking up fine particles of epoxy dust. 

 

If I need to flatten a piece of epoxy I generally put some Vaseline onto the sides of two plastic sandwich (not both sides, just the side facing in!) and squash the epoxy between the bags using a book or something else flat and heavy. You can add in a piece of brass rod or wire if your finished piece will need support or if you need a connection piece. 

 

Straight line sculpting is tougher than it looks. Don't get discouraged if it is harder than you expected!

 

 

 

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On 10/11/2018 at 4:37 AM, GHarris said:

Blend some Aves Apoxy Sculpt into your greenstuff, about a 40% Aves to 60% green ratio. Milliput can be filed and cured like ceramic but is pretty toxic and a huge pain to mix. Magic Sculpt on its own is a bit brittle. Greenstuff + Aves gives you the best of both worlds: edge retention, longer work time than straight green, plus a little flexibility in the finished piece. Sculpt the pieces into the shapes you want and keep going back and working the edges as they cure. After the epoxy completely sets up you can file it with hobby files or sand it with fine grit sandpaper (think finishing grades). I do a lot of sideways scraping with a dull exacto blade when I am working cured epoxy into shape, but do what seems natural to you. A dust mask may be a good idea as you will be kicking up fine particles of epoxy dust. 

 

If I need to flatten a piece of epoxy I generally put some Vaseline onto the sides of two plastic sandwich (not both sides, just the side facing in!) and squash the epoxy between the bags using a book or something else flat and heavy. You can add in a piece of brass rod or wire if your finished piece will need support or if you need a connection piece. 

 

Straight line sculpting is tougher than it looks. Don't get discouraged if it is harder than you expected!

 

 

 


Oh, thanks very much for this advice! That's a good flattening technique--I'd just been using the exacto handle as a rolling pin. 

Not wrong about the straight line sculpting; I resorted to some basic whittling and got the parts...not perfect, but good enough to use. The finished piece is the Benthic Walker, and I'm okay with how the claws came out. 

I'll be on the lookout for Aves Apoxy!

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I've also heard of people using small pasta rollers to flatten out sheets of epoxy, but I've never tried it myself. Could be worth a look though.

 

Looks like your grabby claws are coming along nicely!

 

 

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