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ReaperCon 2019 -- Classes I Would Take

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These are classes I would enroll in.

 

1.  Base Vegetation.  A hands-on class on bushes, flowers, grasses, weeds, stumps, shubbery and such.

 

2.  Browns:  A hands-on class on evaluating, choosing, creating, complementing, shading and highlighting various browns from light tan to subterranean ocher.

 

3.  Contrast and Then Contrast Some More:  A hands-on class in which the only focus is contrast.  Blending and such techniques ignored.

 

4.  Hangy Things: A hands-on class on painting quivers and scabbards and pouches and belts and poles and bows and lutes ... stuff that hangs off a mini.  Color choice and execution in often cramped quarters.

 

Any other druthers?

 

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I, too, would love a base vegetation class. I've taken a couple basing classes from Michael Proctor. Both were great, and he offered a little bit of vegetation knowledge during this most recent one, but I would love to get a bit more in depth on this subject.

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Classes I'd like to take:

- any sort of sculpting classes focused on doing conversions, with hands on work.  Things like adding pouches, chains and straps or making new hands for weapon swaps

- a BMPC sculpting class by @TaleSpinner

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I really dig the fourth idea. I'd dig more materials classes like painting realistic tartan, jeans, wool, leather, etc. 

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3 hours ago, Highlander said:

These are classes I would enroll in.

 

1.  Base Vegetation.  A hands-on class on bushes, flowers, grasses, weeds, stumps, shubbery and such.

 

2.  Browns:  A hands-on class on evaluating, choosing, creating, complementing, shading and highlighting various browns from light tan to subterranean ocher.

 

3.  Contrast and Then Contrast Some More:  A hands-on class in which the only focus is contrast.  Blending and such techniques ignored.

 

4.  Hangy Things: A hands-on class on painting quivers and scabbards and pouches and belts and poles and bows and lutes ... stuff that hangs off a mini.  Color choice and execution in often cramped quarters.

 

Any other druthers?

 

All very good ideas.

 

I'd definitely jump all over taking #1.

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2 hours ago, kristof65 said:

Classes I'd like to take:

- any sort of sculpting classes focused on doing conversions, with hands on work.  Things like adding pouches, chains and straps or making new hands for weapon swaps

- a BMPC sculpting class by @TaleSpinner

Bob and Julie's Sculpting details did the first part.

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I'd love to take a class for hands-on building dioramas; how to plot one out and such.

 

Bones conversions are always fun, we need more of those. *sage nod*

 

4 hours ago, Highlander said:

These are classes I would enroll in.

 

1.  Base Vegetation.  A hands-on class on bushes, flowers, grasses, weeds, stumps, shubbery and such.

 

2.  Browns:  A hands-on class on evaluating, choosing, creating, complementing, shading and highlighting various browns from light tan to subterranean ocher.

 

3.  Contrast and Then Contrast Some More:  A hands-on class in which the only focus is contrast.  Blending and such techniques ignored.

 

4.  Hangy Things: A hands-on class on painting quivers and scabbards and pouches and belts and poles and bows and lutes ... stuff that hangs off a mini.  Color choice and execution in often cramped quarters.

 

Seconding pretty much ALL OF THIS.

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21 minutes ago, Corporea said:

Bob and Julie's Sculpting details did the first part.

 

One of the best classes I took this year. I felt like I left the class with skills that I did not have when I got there, not just a bit of a level up of skills that I already had.

 

Highly recommended.

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<Shameless Plug>

 

My "Sculpting Nature" class covers a lot of point 1 from a creation standpoint. The students learn the techniques to sculpt rocks, foliage, and a stump (and actually sculpt a couple themselves). I use these three simple sculpts to allow the students to try with guidance some of the basic fundamental sculpting techniques and discuss how to adapt these forms into whatever you want.  I think it went well, though we agreed on a new approach for next year that will make it better.

 

This year the students made a rock and a fern leaf and I demoed a stump armature.  Next year, I have plans to adjust the order of the class and pre-make the stump armatures so the students can have practice detailing them.  @Morihalda made the cutest rock ever; it even had a little smile (uninentionaly, which made it epic). 

 

I'm looking forward to teaching this one again, as it was the first time I've taught a class where I left feeling more energized than when I started it. ::D:

 

</Shameless Plug>

 

@kristof65: I am working on a BMPC class.  I just need to figure out how to make it work, since several of the step require hardening between them. I'm not certain how to handle that.  I might make the armatures, rock, and eyeball ahead of time and have them focus on the rest.  Thoughts?

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2 hours ago, Doug Sundseth said:

 

One of the best classes I took this year. I felt like I left the class with skills that I did not have when I got there, not just a bit of a level up of skills that I already had.

 

Highly recommended.

I agree with Doug. I have zero sculpting experience and I came out of the class knowing how to sculpt a belt + pouch combo and a skeleton with a mohawk. Wish they ran a 4 hour boot camp. They have so much knowledge combined and the way they teach is relaxing and learning conducive.

 

On suggestions for classes, I wouldn't mind seeing classes on:

1. Highlighting small surfaces. Most of what we learn are blends on large surfaces, but how do we translate that to smaller surfaces. I think that could go along with the above suggestion of painting dangly parts.

 

2. Sculpting tips for unnatural creatures that seem more natural. I have read through @TaleSpinner's thread on some of the creature creations he has created, like the turtles, the basilisk, etc. and it's fascinating how something that isn't normally found in our world, can be created in 3D and seem natural. 

 

6 minutes ago, TaleSpinner said:

<Shameless Plug>

 

My "Sculpting Nature" class covers a lot of point 1 from a creation standpoint. The students learn the techniques to sculpt rocks, foliage, and a stump (and actually sculpt a couple themselves). I use these three simple sculpts to allow the students to try with guidance some of the basic fundamental sculpting techniques and discuss how to adapt these forms into whatever you want.  I think it went well, though we agreed on a new approach for next year that will make it better.

 

This year the students made a rock and a fern leaf and I demoed a stump armature.  Next year, I have plans to adjust the order of the class and pre-make the stump armatures so the students can have practice detailing them.  @Morihalda made the cutest rock ever; it even had a little smile (uninentionaly, which made it epic). 

 

I'm looking forward to teaching this one again, as it was the first time I've taught a class where I left feeling more energized than when I started it. ::D:

 

</Shameless Plug>

 

@kristof65: I am working on a BMPC class.  I just need to figure out how to make it work, since several of the step require hardening between them. I'm not certain how to handle that.  I might make the armatures, rock, and eyeball ahead of time and have them focus on the rest.  Thoughts?

 

I'm hoping you offer to teach it next year. I attempted to get into your class and GrowTix was having a hissy fit. And it was also sold out. T__T

Edited by pcktlnt
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3 hours ago, TaleSpinner said:

My "Sculpting Nature" class covers a lot of point 1 from a creation standpoint. The students learn the techniques to sculpt rocks, foliage, and a stump (and actually sculpt a couple themselves). I use these three simple sculpts to allow the students to try with guidance some of the basic fundamental sculpting techniques and discuss how to adapt these forms into whatever you want.  I think it went well, though we agreed on a new approach for next year that will make it better.

 

This year the students made a rock and a fern leaf and I demoed a stump armature.  Next year, I have plans to adjust the order of the class and pre-make the stump armatures so the students can have practice detailing them.  @Morihalda made the cutest rock ever; it even had a little smile (uninentionaly, which made it epic). 

 

I'm looking forward to teaching this one again, as it was the first time I've taught a class where I left feeling more energized than when I started it. ::D:

 

Another excellent class. The fern leaf was very interesting and taught several things that I later used in Julie and Bob's class. The rock didn't turn out as well for me, though it was very useful in starting to understand how to push greenstuff around. Working with a larger mass was interesting, but I need more work before I start to feel like I actually understand much there. I just wish we could have gotten to the stump, as I think the textures there would have been really interesting to attempt. I'll have to try one on my own.

 

Between your classes and Bob and Julie's class, I think I have the tools to take a few more steps forward without being overwhelmed.

 

Next year I think I'll try taking a class to sculpt something with a pulse. :rolleyes:

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(Simple?) Special Effects Painting:

 

A Hands on class that attempts things like metallic brass creatures, Stone golems, statues, blue ghosts, green wraiths, faux acid washed finish....and other such things. 

 

Edited by TGP
Simple?
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I loved that nature class! It was very relaxing and I learned lots of neat tricks and details. Andy's teaching process was also an excellent way to remember that we've gotta be willing to go that extra step if we want to do our best. Every time we thought, "Aha! So that's how you make a cool rock!" he'd add another step haha!

 

My heart is still sad about losing that little rock - I was so proud of him. I'm tired of being forgetful. :< 

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Didn't see a class this year about it, but maybe a 202 level class on model prep would be helpful for many newbs, kinda like me. 

 

Now i'm not suggesting a tutorial on washing the minis, but proper pinning and general positioning on bases. I can't for the life of me pin a tiny weapon,  or an arm, or a model who is standing on one foot to a base Would be nice to know a trick or such for it. 

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