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Lidless Eye

Lidless Eye Hobbies: 3D Printed Orctober

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Finished at the last minute, another year in a row of Nurgly Orks for Orctober!

These were printed from Duncan Shadow Louca's designs

 

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Yurtrus has been busy, it seems!

Great loathsome work! They look horribly distorted, especially the Barnacle Orc. 

Prolapse Orc is horrific. Good stuff.

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