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use texture. A crosshatch technique would work.  You alternate vertical and horizontal lines to get the rough textured pattern.  like this:

cross-hatch-2.jpg?w=262&h=197&ssl=1

 

Done with very fine lines, the texture may vanish and the blend will look smoother. If you leave more space between your lines you can get a rougher texture.  You can also shade and highlight with this, just using your other colors and working in brighter and darker shades. This works well with a lot of different textured fabrics.  Have fun!  It's a fussy technique.  Don't be afraid to keep going over it with more lines. As long as the paint is thinned, you can play with the lines to your heart's content!

 

Here's what I did with the cape of my giant mouseling:

mouse1.thumb.jpg.cebc047f44baf207f9df43784b6157e3.jpgmouse2.thumb.jpg.bd739d8806fccc47bcb6211c63d098b9.jpg

 

 

Edited by Corporea
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^^ That looks very similar to the red cloak I did on a dwarf. I was aiming a bit more at thick wool fabric, textured. Roughly same method as what I did too. You can play with the brightness of the cross hatches as you go, and do layers of them if you want. My last one went too bright so I had to glaze it back down, but it worked out in the end. 

 

What I'm finding, the more I play with textures, is that the more liberating they can be. It isn't like a precise bit of freehanding, and it isn't like smooth blending. There is wiggle room. It seems scary at first, but then almost gives leeway to be slightly sloppy. Not totally sloppy, but you can nick your smoothly blended surface and it isn't ruined. You aren't using drastically different colors, and you are trying to make the surface look rough, so it is okay. If you accidentally put two lines stacked instead of next to each other? Not really a big deal. 

 

Honestly, I think I should have tried texturing my minis long ago. It looks cool and isn't as scary as it seems. If you know how to control thinned paint, you're good to give it a whirl. 

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Thanks for the ideas!   I'm usually more of a rough and ready tabletop painter, but I'll give this a try.

 Hope my brush is small enough! ::P:

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49 minutes ago, Chris Palmer said:

Thanks for the ideas!   I'm usually more of a rough and ready tabletop painter, but I'll give this a try.

 Hope my brush is small enough! ::P:

 

I used either my R&C 0 or my R&C 2. I actually think that a small brush is a bad idea here. Perhaps if you were doing only a few tiny spots, like reflections on eyes, but you're doing a lot of lines. You need a fine tip, yes, but if you had to go fetch more paint after each stripe that would suck. With the larger brush you can go down almost the whole ridge on one brush-load with iterative \\\\\\\\\ lines, and it goes pretty swiftly. Then the next brush-load can go /////////. That's much better than \ - reload, \ - reload, \ - reload, / - reload, / - reload, / - reload. 

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13 hours ago, Corporea said:

use texture. A crosshatch technique would work.  You alternate vertical and horizontal lines to get the rough textured pattern.  like this:

cross-hatch-2.jpg?w=262&h=197&ssl=1

 

Done with very fine lines, the texture may vanish and the blend will look smoother. If you leave more space between your lines you can get a rougher texture.  You can also shade and highlight with this, just using your other colors and working in brighter and darker shades. This works well with a lot of different textured fabrics.  Have fun!  It's a fussy technique.  Don't be afraid to keep going over it with more lines. As long as the paint is thinned, you can play with the lines to your heart's content!

 

Here's what I did with the cape of my giant mouseling:

mouse1.thumb.jpg.cebc047f44baf207f9df43784b6157e3.jpgmouse2.thumb.jpg.bd739d8806fccc47bcb6211c63d098b9.jpg

 

 

 

Do you start with a dark cloth and then paint lighter stripes?

 

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make your life easier and buy a comber brush:

comber.jpg.235295f7a2ae48b28d494efd8f32180e.jpg

 

They produce instant grasses, fur and feathers and, in this case, textures ;) 1/8 is the right size IMO

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Depends on the color, but I usually basecoat a midtone then do all the shading and highlighting with the lines. In the case of the red above (because red does not cover well,) I basecoated mahogany and then worked up.

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I think I did a midtone base coat, then shaded as normal, and worked up highlights with lines. Might have done a round back down in the shadows afterward too, but the shadows don't need to show as much (in my opinion, at least). Multiple ways to skin a cat, and all that :poke:

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At the risk of committing heretical blasphemy, I've found that a very fine mechanical pencil or ultra-fine-tip pen can provide a nice patterning effect, visible from a distance. Here's an example of a wool sweater done with 0.5mm mechanical pencil:
 DSCN4229.JPG

I'm excited to experiment with one of those comber brushes, though!

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I would hesitate to recommend a pen or pencil because the coloring can be displaced if you use a wet brush on top of it. You prevent yourself from being able to use glazes or washes afterward. 

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Micron pens are waterproof once the ink dries. So are Faber-Castell Pitt Pens that come in some smaller tip sizes. Pitt pens are India ink. (Note that I personally use a brush for all this stuff, but I've heard talk of people using Micron pens for freehand or dotting eyes in the past. I also have used them for pen and wash watercolour painting, which definitely works better with a waterproof ink. :->) 

 

I would give the ink a good while to dry before I went over it with more paint, however. Since paint is a much less absorbant surface than paper, I imagine it will take a while for the ink to dry. I suspect 10 minutes would be more than adequate, but I'd give it at least 30 or test to be thorough.

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Good to know which pens are good and which aren't, thank you ::):

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