Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Evilhalfling

Painting in the style of ......

Recommended Posts

@Evilhalfling you mentioned study art history and such.

 

Might I add / suggest to look at pictures from animals a lot?

And maybe pics of human faces etc.

 

I paint a lot of reptiles/dinos etc and I found that looking at pictures of real reptiles/birds and fish help me to create nice patterns.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

@Evilhalfling you mentioned study art history and such.

 

Might I add / suggest to look at pictures from animals a lot?

And maybe pics of human faces etc.

 

I paint a lot of reptiles/dinos etc and I found that looking at pictures of real reptiles/birds and fish help me to create nice patterns.

 

 

that's a different project - more technique than style. I know the lizardmen would look more realistic with patterns, these are basically a single color (plus eyes and perhaps claws)  but it would lessen the impact. 

 

Caravaggio is next, and I'm actually using a (bright red)  spotted salamader as a guide. He liked realistic animals, assuming they were standing around in an unlit barn, at night. 

Edited by Evilhalfling
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, malefactus said:

For a REAL challenge, you could try Jackson Pollock's technique.

 

bleh.  

he is in my book, but im not getting that close to the present. looking ahead - I don't like much of the 20th century - although I may make an exception for Picasso.

let's call him the end point. 

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh shoot, now I want to get a Nolzurs duodrone, slap black-bordered rectangles of primary colors over him, and call him Piet Modrion. 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Caravaggio employed close physical observation with a dramatic use of chiaroscuro that came to be known as tenebrism. He made the technique a dominant stylistic element, darkening shadows and transfixing subjects in bright shafts of light. Caravaggio vividly expressed crucial moments and scenes, often featuring violent struggles, torture and death. He worked rapidly, with live models, preferring to forgo drawings and work directly onto the canvas. 

 

 

caravaggio.jpg

cara.jpg

 

I can just imagine the conversations on the first one..

"WHy did you paint the rear end of horse?" 

Its the conversion of a saint.

you mean the old guy leading the horse? 

no the guy lying on the ground

seriously?   we aren't paying for that. 

 

Who is the guy leading the horse then? 

it doesn't matter.

he looks familiar - isn't that your landlord? 

 

 

Edited by Evilhalfling
  • Like 2
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/12/2019 at 9:22 AM, Evilhalfling said:

 

bleh.  

he is in my book, but im not getting that close to the present. looking ahead - I don't like much of the 20th century - although I may make an exception for Picasso.

let's call him the end point. 

 

It was meant as a joke. Jackson Pollock's method entailed HUGE canvasses & skillfully hurling buckets of paint across them.

It might not lend itself to details.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, malefactus said:

 

It was meant as a joke. Jackson Pollock's method entailed HUGE canvasses & skillfully hurling buckets of paint across them.

It might not lend itself to details.

Inspiration!!  *Throws open bottle of paint at Ma'al Drakar* :upside:

  • Like 2
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Jasper_the_2nd said:

Inspiration!!  *Throws open bottle of paint at Ma'al Drakar* :upside:


from the local Gazette:

:The stomped upon, clawed, gnawed and incinerated remains pf Jasper the 2nd will be available for viewing tonight at the Malefactus' Funeral Home and Pizza Parlour located by the Scary Woods. Please do not knock over the box or sneeze near it as there were only 2 Tablespoons left of Jasper..."

  • Like 1
  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, malefactus said:

 

It was meant as a joke. Jackson Pollock's method entailed HUGE canvasses & skillfully hurling buckets of paint across them.

It might not lend itself to details.

 

I missed the point on that one... 

yeah that's not going to translate well. 

 

Caravaggio Lizard: 

so lots of black, small surface area in high contrast.  

went with red, specifically northern red salamander coloring.  

Red_Salamander.jpg.b9784d02872037c6f2a9237f0bc777c6.jpg

 

but I want to get the red right before I move on to spots. 

I used my new inks in an attempt to intensify the red and in the black - but im still not happy with the matt appearance - guess I need to as some pure white reflections. 

advice and critiques welcome, this whole project is just for learning. 

 

 

Cara_2a.jpg

cara_2b.jpg

cara_2c.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

somewhere between step 1 and step 10 (final highlights before spots), this went wrong.  This first guy is going on to paint club tomorrow before I a add back spots. 

For the second Caravaggio Lizard man im going to start with step 1 - two color primer coat.   

Then I'm going to look closely at one of the painters red shirts and copy the highlight/ shadow colors. 

 

cara_3a.jpg.288daca316f99265e1b1a7575b3b82fb.jpg

 

 

cara2_1a.jpg

cara2_1b.jpg

cara2_1c.jpg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Added Red :  one region at a time cara2_2.jpg.966b42f19c78b6143ea66cf70bca294d.jpg

 

Added black spots to the first one, hard catch in focus on a camera.  I decided they didn't actually ad much to the figure, even in person they are hard to see.  So I  passed on adding them to the archer. 

 

Cara_4.jpg.d066483dc20e5efed60948e99cdbfda0.jpg

 

 

then I went ahead and finished them off.   I should really do a show off thread. 

I worked a lot on pushing contrast and got more practice highlighting red.  but im not sure I went very deeply into his style.

they really need a background/ diorama to fully express the artist.   Plus you have to assume that lizardman are holy figures, just like you have too for the El Greco versions

a Caravaggio diorama could just be the lizard men in front of a painted (mostly black) backdrop with a few shadowy trees.   While El Greco lizardmen would need sculpted clouds opening up around them, painted with a similar green/yellow light. 

Backgrounds would also allow me to add the reflections and self-references that my next painter: Diago Velaquez was so fond of.  - although his portraits were sometimes just sepia dropcloths.  

 

 

  

 

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Diago Velaquez.  

 

Velázquez' final portraits of the royal children are among his finest works and in the Infanta Margarita Teresa in a Blue Dress[15] the painter's personal style reached its high-point here: shimmering spots of color on wide painting surfaces produce an almost impressionistic effect - the viewer must stand at a suitable distance to get the impression of complete, three-dimensional spatiality.

 

Velázquez is known for his limited pallet - favoring shades of grey and blue

 

His portraits were often on simple sepia drop cloths, while his scenes had layers of depth.

 

- this image is really big zoom in look at brush strokes it's fascinating. 

Diego_Rodriguez_de_Silva_y_Velázquez_-_Infanta_Margarita_Teresa.jpg

diago.jpg

Edited by Evilhalfling
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent Wednesday thinking about this painters style and Today trying to paint it. 

I ran into competing issues. 

1. he is practically impressionist in brush strokes, with objects broken down based on color and light rather than trying to capture it exactly.  one source said the ideal distance to view one of these is 20' 

- ie this style focuses on tabletop distance   

2. his style focuses on endless shades of grey rather than the sharp contrasts of light next to dark - of the previous 2 artists. 

- ultra thin paint and glazing was mentioned. 

 

options: 

A: find someone else miniature and copy the lights and colors used - that way I can just paint what I see.  - but i couldn't find a copy a liked.

B: do a study of light and pattern on paper then carefully place each color exactly where it needed to be.  

 

tried B with mixed success. 

shadowStudy2.jpg

vela1_F.jpg

vela1_2f.jpg

vela1_3f.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×