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  1. http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/51080-bones-well-of-chaos-optional-rules/?hl=%2Bwell+%2Blegends Above is the link to the optional fantasy RPG rules for using the Well of Legends in your tabletop game(s). Below are the different forms the Well will take:
    24 points
  2. You think you're excited? Feel these nipples!
    12 points
  3. This is one funky monkey. My first and natural instinct was to paint him with a standard black leather jacket, but I thought I'd give him a bit of a James Dean look with the red jacket and jeans. The rest really just fell together nicely. Big risk with this guy was the shades - I hummed and hahhed about doing black shades or mirror shades, but my better half convinced me that I should be trying to grow my skills and I went for it. I wouldn't say it came out exactly perfect, or that it was necessarily the right mini to do it on, but I'm happy with it.
    11 points
  4. I was at Reaper a couple of weeks back and saw some of the things planned for KS#2. They made me promise not to say any specifics, but there was some really beautiful stuff there. I can't afford it, but I know I won't be able to resist. It will be a smaller pledge than last time. They also said they're building in a way that their sculpters will get more of the loot out of it, which I thought was nice (from a commercial point of view, it makes sense, as it means their sculptors don't leave to run their own Kickstarters). Apologies if this has already been discussed at length in the last 79 pages. James
    11 points
  5. Theres a WIP here if you want to see how this evolved. I'm pretty pleased with how this one turned out, especially the base. I hope you like her. As usual all C&C very much appreciated.
    9 points
  6. DnD: Loss of alignment, loss of deity, the works. DnD's alignment system is part of the game. Then again, if the goblin is truly evil and you let it live...? Last Knight, don't give up, never ever give up. Get up and punch life right in the damn face. The wolf at the door? MRE on legs. And, nope, not pathetic. If it was a mate feeling like this, you wouldn't call him pathetic, would you? OFF TOPIC: My 6 year old (autistic) son insisted I pick him up. Then he hugged my head, declared "I'm a headcrab!" and insisted I run around like a half-life 2 zombie. <3
    8 points
  7. I understand not being able to please everyone, but the hate mail you guys received about the freebies you chose to include is a bit much. Really, entitlement complex much? I hope you Reaper folks are happy to let that roll off your backs and know that the most vocal is not always the largest part of your audience. I honestly loved the large variety of minis. They're not all things I may have purchased if I have the chance, but they're things that are really cool to have. Like dungeon accessories and townsfolk, so useful!
    8 points
  8. This renegade robot dog was really fun to paint, and only took an hour or two. His name is CL1FF0RD and, as was pointed out in my WIP thread, he totally looks like a Voltron cat. I really feel like I might actually be improving in painting flat areas of colour!
    7 points
  9. 50149 Natalia, Female Secret Agent Sculptor Jeff Grace Project #7 COMPLETE She's finally done. I thought this one was going to kill me.
    7 points
  10. Hello again everyone who comes to this lovely little forum to show off and take a look at some of the nicest miniatures around. Today I bring to you not a Reaper mini (didn't have one that fit my character so had to look else where), but one I found for a game called Hell Dorado. So far I've finished only the base coat and a little bit of the highlighting on his body. I'm looking at whitening up his clothes a bit more and then I need to work on his eyes and all of the touchups. So without further adieu, here is my latest mini: When I finish him up tomorrow I'll be sure to post the final product and share some of my thoughts on this particular mini. In the mean time if yall have any comments or recommendations I would love to hear them as I'm still very much a newbie to the hobby.
    6 points
  11. You think you're excited? Feel these nipples! Wow.....just wow.... For the record, beer feels no better passing through ones nose than any other liquid.
    6 points
  12. DISCLAIMER: Yes, I made this all up after seeing Buglips's painted Well of Chaos. This is meant to be broken and thus fun. Any holes or loose ends you discover feel free to mend on your own. Excuse me while I go order 7 more wells. The Party Discovers: “The Well of Legends” Once per session, while dungeon diving, when a PC rolls a 20 on a search check, part of the floor crumbles away into an abyss and a Well of Legends emerges. It remains until someone, or something, takes from it. Each Well has one ‘use’. It can be consumed at the well itself or bottled. If bottled/or used on the spot the Well sinks back into the abyss and the floor restores itself. Consumption, skin contact, and blood transmission (injection or a coated blade) are known means of ‘use’. Roll 1d6 to determine the Well type. If the PC has knowledge they may choose the effect. If they don’t they roll 1d3 after use to determine effect. 1 Well of Blood (Red) = Restore full HP AND cure all diseases(including incurable ones) OR restore one severed limb OR dunk head of dead guy to resurrect (head must be attached) 2 Well of Ether (Blue) = Fully restore all of your Points Pools (all types) OR spells/spell-like abilities/special abilities/etc “for the day” OR remove one curse of your choice. 3 Fount of Wellness (Yellow) = Remove ALL Status Effects, OR all negatives levels, OR all ability score damage to one ability score 4 The Necrowell (Purple) = Gain the Undead Template OR Remove the Undead Template (affected creature is restored to full life with full health using their origin race. If no origin race the Undead simply turns to ash and blows away) OR Cause Instant Death (no saves, no getting out of it, you are dead). 5 Gaia Spring (Green/Overgrown with vegetation) = Permanently Gain: Control Plants (Su 1/day/level) OR Wild Shape (Su – see Druid for details – use Character Level) OR an Animal Companion (Vermin or Animal only). 6 Well of Knowledge (creamy/sparkly water with book bobbing in it) = Go up one level (gain exactly enough XP to reach next level). OR gain Omniscient (Su 1/day): you may roll an Intelligence check on ANY knowledge check regardless of subcategory OR Gain any one feat, regardless of prerequisites. 7 Well of Greed (filled with treasure) 1d4 regardless of knowledge = Roll 1d4, 1d6, 1d8, 1d10, 1d12, 1d20, and 1d% and multiply them in reverse order. The well spews the resultant total in gold coins into the space the fountain spawned in. OR the well consumes ALL of your wealth and personal possessions regardless of location OR a Wondrous Item emerges from the coins (GM rolls this item up to keep it random) OR a Cursed Item emerges from the coins (GM rolls this item up to keep it random). 8 Well of Chaos (black) 1d6 regardless of knowledge = You are banished to another plane of existence OR You are banished to another planet in your solar system OR You are banished to another game system OR You cause an out-of-season solar eclipse and become Michael Bolton OR You summon a creature/character from another plane of existence (first thing to pop in your head) OR You summon a creature/character from another game system (first thing that pops into your head)
    5 points
  13. Some decent shots of the Street Judges I painted on holiday. Painted as a group to fit with the ones that I've already done. This bumps me up over half way done with my Judges! Well, until Chief Judge Hershey arrives, when I'll slide back to exactly half.
    5 points
  14. I am super excited to hear they're working on a way to get the artists a slice of the action. That is damn classy.
    5 points
  15. I actually just got my vampire box in the mail today (got it off of ebay for 200 and included storm giants, kalaxdrax, and cthulhu) I am super excited about all of these new minis, especially at trying my hands at painting Kaladrax! but at the same time I am very excited about getting in on the ground floor of KS 2.
    5 points
  16. Lack of updating since yesterday was due to my school (through which we get internet, nothing we can do about that) deciding to do something and messing up the DNS something-or-other. Several websites, including anything Reaper, flatly refused to open. Which was sad. Friday night is also gaming night, so very few pictures, but lots of little things got done. Firstly, I did the leather strap on the back of his coat and redid his boots with Oiled Leather, and I'm liking the look much more. I also went back over his skin with unthinned Tanned Leather, and I think my bottle must just be on the thin side, since it took a couple more coats to get a good, even coverage (especially on his hands). Then I did his belt buckle, belt loop, buttons and the random little buttons on the leather straps on his legs in Antique Gold. I'm trying to figure out what to do with the thingies on his belt, since I think they're pouches, but the one on the right is kinda...odd. I googled finished examples, and it looks like no one else really knew what to do with them either and just made them the same color as the belt. I also noticed that a lot of people painted his, uh...crotch armor? in the same color as the belt, so I tried that, and it looked absolutely horrid, so I changed it back to just being part of his pants. Messing around with whether to use Antique Gold or New Gold for the buttons and stuff gave me an idea. New Gold is basically yellow with a little shine/sparkle to it, so I delicately dabbed a touch of it onto the yellow areas of his eyes. I'm not sure whether you can tell from the picture or not, since the effect is fairly subtle, but his eyes look a lot more lion-like now. :D Still to do (this is mostly so I don't forget anything, as well as helping me figure out a rough order to do things in): Shoulders and belt pouches in a warm dark brown (like a dark leather) Staff in a dark mahogany (if I can mix one up that looks good) Touch up the metallic bits on the top of the staff with more Molten Bronze Fur on his coat in a color somewhere in between the shoulder and staff colors Pick out details on boots in Antique Gold Necklace in Oiled Leather and either Aged Bone or Yellowed Bone (they're supposed to be claws or teeth) Shade/highlight hair, working the coat fur color into the ends of it Shade/highlight skin (adding a bit of the dark fur color to the end of his tail) Shade/highlight clothes (using the shade color for his cuffs, then using the same gray as the pants for the bits of shirt sleeve poking out) Shade/highlight boots, belt and staff Attempt a slight OSL from his hand (I may/may not get to this, we'll see) Tidy up anything glaring Paint base in savanna colors Seal it with Brush-on Sealer Glue on grass "sea urchins" Wrap it, pack it, ship it. It looks like a whole lot more than it actually is, I just tend to break things into tiny chunks because it makes my brain happy to cross things off of lists. I anticipate the shading/highlighting to go relatively quickly, since I'm not going to try anything too drastic or fancy. I'm also not going to try and redo all of the darklining I accidentally painted over when I was putting down basecoats. I'll just put a shade color in the nooks and crannies and call it good; I don't want to mess anything up at this point, and I get the feeling if I mess up anything, it would be with that. Huzzah! --OneBoot :D
    5 points
  17. Finished up the last of these in my sets today. The color schemes are all based on actual beetles, though all modified at least a bit.
    5 points
  18. Buglips's comments are spot on, especially about conservation of effort. A few tricks I like to use: 1) Foreshadowing is great. But you don't necessarily need to know exactly what it is that you're foreshadowing when it happens. If there's a mysterious cloaked stranger in town in the first episode, it might be Aragorn, or Saruman, or Jack the Ripper, or the king in disguise. And you don't have to decide which until you have a reason to make him a focus NPC. We're not working with a 105 minute movie here. Sometimes Chekov's gun can stay on the mantelpiece for a very long time. 2) I absolutely agree about NPC reactions. It costs nothing for the wife of the peasant that your party rescued at level one to come back a few levels later and publicly thank the party as they walk down the street. Or for the people in the village they rescued from the horrible orc invasion to make sure they never have to pay for drinks in that town again. Or for the baron to mention that he heard about their heroism and support the group when they're falsely accused by nasty enemies five levels later. 3) If you want the PCs to hang out on the edge, it can be useful to set up climactic encounters so that enemy reinforcements arrive after the start of the fight. If the PCs are waltzing through the encounter you thought might be really challenging, the second wave can be a useful corrective. And if the party is close to death, it's not actually necessary for that second wave to arrive at all. Whatever you do, though, don't start with overwhelming NPC forces and then send in a rescue force that is clearly superior to the PCs. That devalues the contributions of the protagonists of the piece and isn't fun for anyone. 4) Exception to 3: If you've previously established that it isn't the PCs' job to beat the bad guys but rather to delay them just long enough for the cavalry to arrive, it won't feel like they're being rescued, but rather that they've achieved a great victory. McPherson's Ridge is a fine heroic scenario, but it has to be foreshadowed or it will feel cheap. 5) You don't need to map out every peasant's house, or tavern, or cathedral. You've probably seen houses and taverns and cathedrals, at least in movies, so just make it up. If you're going to use the place later, take notes of what you said, but when you're narrating, it really doesn't matter whether the inn has two or three private dining rooms or that the stables in the courtyard has a bed in the tack room for the ostler. 6) While you're making up details, make up smells and sounds and feels. The drip of water off the Spanish Moss, the smell of decaying vegetation, and the air so thick that it's work to breathe as the PCs track the serpent folk through the swamp will be more memorable than any extensive boxed text. You've been (or again, seen in movies) lots of places. Use what you've seen to add verisimilitude and depth. Small details can evoke a complex set of reactions in players. 7) For most groups and games, it's not worth the effort to track coppers or ounces of encumbrance. Hand wave the tedious stuff. Sure, if every coin has been stolen, it can be interesting to have the PCs scrambling for a while, but when they're flush, you can assume that they have enough pocket change to handle the odd round of drinks. Leave the minute accounting to times when you're being paid to do accounting. It's not an interesting hobby for most players.
    5 points
  19. Just finished this guy today. I also have a WIP of him if anyone is interested http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/51381-colossal-lords-wip/
    4 points
  20. Runelord: two words. Scalding. Hot. Coffee. OK, so that's three words.
    4 points
  21. A renegade robot servo droid with stump gun, all based and ready to go! Totally not a C-3PO ripoff. Not at all. Really glad I ended up going with normal layering instead of drybrushing with this one, totally paid off.
    4 points
  22. I can see the comment rage, like a misty omen of doom in my seeing stone.
    4 points
  23. They should do some stretch goals like "pizza for the packers" and "write your name on the celebratory cake" so that the staff can also keep their morale up :)
    4 points
  24. WOW!! I've been away for a while and now I come back and see that you have made an ENORMOUS leap in your painting. I'm very impressed with your rapid progress.
    4 points
  25. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Corporea for getting "Magic Dance" stuck in my head for the rest of the night. It's an awesome song, so I suppose I can forgive you. :D I've been plugging right along, and I still would be if my neck and eyes hadn't insisted on a break, so I figured now was a good a time as any to update. I mixed 1 drop Muddy Brown with 2 drops Oiled Leather to do his fur collar, as well as the tip of his tail (I tried to make it look fuzzy, but I'm not sure I really succeeded). I also did the little bit of tail visible through the back of his coat. I...really have no idea how I managed to totally miss this until now. Next I did the hard leather bits in Muddy Brown. I'd wanted to mix up something that looked more leather-like, but I realized I'd sort of run myself out of options by using Oiled Leather in his hair and fur color, and I didn't want it to blend in too much. I'm still not convinced that it doesn't blend in too much, but I'm hoping that once I've gotten some highlighting and shading done on the fur it will be more differentiated. I also did the cuffs of his coat in Muddy Brown instead of a darker green to see if I would like it. I'm thinking I've got too much dark brown going on, so I will probably change it to Oiled Leather (not looking forward to that, it took me forever just to get the lines straight the first time! ) Sticking off of the back of his leather shoulder doohickey were a couple of random bits that I couldn't identify, so I turned once again to Google to find out what the heck they were. Apparently they're supposed to be rings, but this is a spot where the conversion to Bonesium wasn't entirely successful, since the two on the right were practically nonexistent. I had to paint the right-most one in by hand, it simply wasn't there. I did these and the most metallic-looking bits on his boots in Antique Gold. Well, gotta keep moving on. Allonsey! Huzzah! --OneBoot :D EDIT: Ugh, I was this close to throwing my computer out the window. Two hours ago, just when I hit "Add Reply" my amazing (read: awful) school internet decided to do weird things again and stop giving access to certain websites (like Reaper), then quit working altogether. I nearly had a heart attack thinking I was going to have to type everything again!! Happily, the forums appear to save posts that are in progress, so when the internet finally started working again, it was still there! Huzzah!! :D
    4 points
  26. So today I learned that my PCs are apparently all evil, including the cleric of the god of (among other things) honor. "Okay, the goblin is unarmed and on his knees in front of you, and has just given you all the information you asked him for, as well as all his worldly possessions. What are you going to do now?" "I slit his throat!" I am surprisingly upset about this.
    4 points
  27. Bryan had mentioned to me at PAX that they were looking at doing that for the featured sculptor stretch goals. Sort of an extension of what they did on a couple of stretch levels last time, but this time they were hoping to offer all new sculpts in those levels. The bonus to the sculptors is, I suspect, to try to get their best efforts from them. The more people that order those particular rewards, the grater the bonus for that particular sculptor.
    4 points
  28. I love this forum. A dispergent group of people, brought together only by a fondness for collecting and painting small bits of metal and plastic, but there is a real and honest sense of community and camaraderie to be found, in things far removed from that hobby.
    4 points
  29. Back from Reaper paint club. :) Got the NNM on the sword done. Added glowing eyes. And some mud and blood to the tomb stone. :)
    4 points
  30. Some BONES from the last few days: Gnome Sorceress: The Gnome Sorceress was done with a LOT of blue, and I though that the darker skin tone and white hair (and trim on her robe) would make her stand out a little from the average Gnome. Ape-X (one of my favorites): Ape-X is...well...Ape-X. I don't know what to say. Cybernetic ape in the age of steel and chrome. Turquoise tile floor, and red lens over his eye. And the Stone Golem: The Stone Golem was painted in a uniform color scheme, until it came to the last step. I highlighted him up from a medium-dark gray to almost white, then washed him in three sections: kilt, ground, and 'skin.' The kilt was done with Payne's Grey, the ground with the ubiquitous Devlan Mud, and the skin with black. I wanted him to have the three different tones to kind of break up the paint scheme a little. Then I added the copper and steel accents. The copper got one coat of my verdigris, and the steel is unweathered. As always, C&C welcome!
    4 points
  31. The question of what is a good game has long weighed heavy in my thoughts. And, actually, for precisely the same problem you have now. It's like some sort of zen puzzle. If a DM kills the party, do they make a sound? DM's of the style in the OP used to be alarmingly prevalent, too. Mostly because back in my teenage years the people who had all the books tended to be spoiled rotten, and the rest of us poor schlubs had to make do. Anyway, over the years I have cobbled together some stuff that seems to make sense. Wasn't easy, though. There are good DMs and bad DMs, and the latter far outnumber the former. But while a Power Player is an annoyance, a Power DM is a Critical Failure. Some people see being in the big seat as an honor. I do not. It's a grotesque job, and I hate it. Unfortunately, I also seem to be pretty good at it. The two may be related. See, I view being a DM as a duty-driven position. And that means lots of work, and I'm not big on work. Some bad DM traits are easy to detect. Like "Versus Mode". Some are subtle, like an overdeveloped world. To be blunt, any DM spending countless hours drawing maps and creating intensely detailed worlds should either spend that time playing Civilization, or spend that time working out story. The setting is only a backdrop, and to be blunt most people will never really care about it. You'll only make yourself bitter. Only create what you must for things to run smoothly and appear to have more depth. There is nothing worse than suffering through reams of read-out opaque history. To run a good game, I've settled on the following Principles: 1. All's Fair in Love and Monsters If monsters can do something, so can players. If players can do something, so can monsters. If you create fancy critical hit rules, both groups get them. If Asmodeus uses fireball and it does X, then unless there's a logical reason otherwise, a player can also do X with the spell. 2. The story is about the characters, the world is just where they hang out If Duke Dunderhead the Third from 200 years ago relates to what the characters are doing, then give him detailed story. If not, don't. It's irrelevant information. Keep it lean, players have short attention spans. Let their imaginations do the work. Less is more, so it's better to give out Dunderhead's backstory as needed in several bits than one big chunk. The more often you reference him, the more real he will seem. 3. Being a character is not a free ride Boromir croaked. Tasha Yar croaked. Being in the credits in big letters doesn't mean you can't die. But that's part of the story, too. If it's a glorious end, people should remember and reference it. Villagers will tell the tale. If it's just bad luck and rats nibble you to death, a good DM will still make it count. Did the other characters leave the body? Resurrect him later as an evil revenant who's ticked off that they treated his life so callously, make him a villain. Or used by a villain. Throw away nothing. 4. Actions have consequences Good deeds should bring fame and renown. Treasure is nice, but having NPCs treat a character differently is nicer. Bad deeds bring the opposite. Without consequences, character actions have no meaning. Without meaning, they have no story. The hardest thing for a DM to master, but the thing that will most pay off, is to take all the random crap that happens and, in the end, make it appear like it was all planned from the start. Aim for that, that's the top tier of DMship. 5. Drama comes from peril Take the PC's to the wire. Right to the edge. Beat them, smash them, humiliate them, rob them, and bring them to the point of no return. Do this often. But do it with purpose. Some may die, but they'll accept this if this is counterbalanced with opportunities for incredible feats of valour. Build in peril, but build in solutions that play to their abilities. And make them use them. Nobody will remember the time the party killed twenty orcs by breathing on them, but everybody will remember the time things reached ultimate desperation and the Paladin with 2 hit points stood and fought against impossible odds. If he wins, epic legend. If not, then he should still accomplish something by dying. That's trust. PC's will ham it up if they trust that no matter what the outcome will be somehow epic. And make sure when they earn a triumph that they get ALL the rewards. Including, but not limited to, villagers throwing themselves at them and heaping them with praise. A swashbuckler with an epic tale should become the pied piper of strumpets everywhere he travels. Give out some Beatlemania if they've earned it. Also give them jealous rivals, because consequences. A rooftop duel between swashbucklers under the full moon to determine once and for all if Reynaud D'Mustache or Guy L'Darkcloak are best at what they do because one of them's been greedy with the ladies fair can be stuff of legend, too. 6. Complexity from simplicity Nothing is worse than wasting 8 hours trying to figure out an overdesigned puzzle. Or wasting game sessions trying to figure out an overwrought mystery. It doesn't take much withheld information to make something mysterious, so keep it light enough to figure out. And don't forget to provide clues and foreshadowing. You can do multiple storylines at once this way, dropping hints of dangers to come while players solve the current problem. 5 simple things going on in various degrees at once will always trump one frustrating mystery. And it makes the world seem alive, too. My group is a pretty high-IQ bunch of people, but they'll still drink clearly labelled elixers of life now and then. So don't make stuff too complicated. 7. Where's this all headed, anyway? The DM must have an end-game planned. It all has to be building to something. A surprising number leave this out, I don't know why. But if you know the end, you can work back from that and link it together (even if only tangentially). This is the framework that binds it all together, and what helps achieve #4 - it looks like it was planned from the start. Now all of that working together, that's going to produce a kick-butt game. It's going to be epic, and enthralling. That's the kind of stuff people will tell other players about decades from now. And I guarantee that if a DM does this, only absolute dire super emergency will keep players from attending. And if word gets out, there'll be a long line of potential recruit replacements looking to get in. Making a game like that is the DM's duty, the DM's most solemn responsibility. And it's tough, which is why most don't manage it. But not managing it, that's okay. Not trying at all, that's inexcusable. Above all, remember this rule: The DM does not make or tell the story. The DM only shapes the opportunity for story to happen.
    4 points
  32. Van Oberen is about done. Need to seal and do some OSL. I painted the trim of his robe and all the metal in GW burnished gold (a very bright yellow metallic) then used P3 Flesh wash and slowly added black ink to do all of it. For the trim (which is hard to see in these images due to the adjacent colors so I might line it) I just covered less areas and for the rest I covered most of it and then reclaimed the highlights with the burnished gold. Leather was done in a similar way with the same inks.
    4 points
  33. Thanks, everyone! Here's another, the Frost Giant Queen: I couldn't get a decent shot of her other side, every single one came out blurry. Sorry.
    4 points
  34. Ok so I've started on one of the bigger dragons amongst all the smaller stuff that I've been working on as well (like skeletons mostly) and figured I might as well put up an Open WIP thread for him. At this stage I've assembled and removed the mould lines I saw with a mix of hobby knife and file. I noticed a couple of extras when I was putting the base coat on, but none of those are problematic enough for me to go back in with knife and file again to remove. I then glued him to a bit of cork. I then glued the cork to a 50mm square base (resin blank in this case, but plastic would do just fine as well), and because Deathsleet likes to lean forward and touch his toes with his forearms I glued the tip of his tail to the resin and cork with the help of a little boiling to get it flexible enough. This results in a dragon that is happy to stand proud. Gaps around the wings are filled with (Atelier) Moulding Paste (available in various brands from art suppliers for far less than GW charges for liquid greenstuff), you can see this on the base as well covering the join between his "broccoli" bases and the cork. Then I got out the LED blue and slathered it on. I'm still not certain what I'm going to do with the belly so it was left plain Bones. I'm not too concerned about the obvious brush strokes in the wings or the inconsistencies in the scales at this time. This colour is essentially the "deepest shadows" and so I'll be going over the whole model with drubrushing and so on as I work up to the mostly white dragon. One thing I'll note at this time is most art of white dragons actually uses grey as the base colour (stone grey for example from the KS paint kits) rather than white. You could actually readily paint Deathsleet in Rainy Grey, then glaze/wash with black ink and then drybrush back through rainy grey to pure white. This is far more in keping with the usual DnD/Pathfinder white dragon art. Anyway here is where my Deathsleet is at now; (Oh the red and cork is because he doesn't fit inside my shoebox light box....)
    3 points
  35. I painted up this Katherine Laddermore for the P3 Grandmasters this year. She got a silver medal. I've also posted her to Coolmini if you'd like to be opinionated about her. Anyway, here she is:
    3 points
  36. I say play it off like the goblin ghost doesn't even know he's dead; he just follows the characters around being "helpful...."
    3 points
  37. Now, to clarify, it was the rogue who actually killed the goblin; the cleric just said, "In game, I say we tie him up, but out of game, let's just kill him!" Furthermore, this is 4e, which crippled the alignment system to the point where I just ditched it altogether. And as one more mitigating circumstance, this is their first adventure, so the player is retroactively spinning it as "oh, my character was so shellshocked and unprepared that she wasn't thinking straight! She's totally going to pray a bunch now to atone, and the next time something similar comes up, she'll be more prepared." So no one's getting DM fiat punishments for now, though I'm trying to decide if I have a plausible reason to bring him back from the dead and have this goblin's ghost follow them around for a while to shame them. Also I totally invoked goblin math during that encounter, and when asked how many other goblins there were, he confidently replied "Twenty!" Buglips is influencing the canon of my game world.
    3 points
  38. White, white, white. Ok trying to get the best white painting technique for DS. so I have tried 3 undercoat colours to see which effect I will like best. (DS is currently blue but I've now decided he must be white) So a grey undercoat: A khaki under coat: And finally and my favourite after trial, a pinky, yellow sandstone colour (Deneb Stone): First coat on:
    3 points
  39. Thank you, everyone. It's been a very good day so far. I'm a big Iron Maiden fan, and this is the cake my wife got for me:
    3 points
  40. When I started convincing my friends to become Pathfinder players last year, I promised one he could be a green wizard (his favourite colour + his video gaming handle). Now he has an avatar: Surprisingly tricky to paint, with all the nooks and crannies behind the beard and under the hat.
    3 points
  41. This week I got to finish two really cool Hasslefree miniatures. First out is Hasslefrarian the Troll Slayer.
    3 points
  42. I went along with it. I'm not sure if me running around going "AUUGH mmmmghgh AGH urgle MMMMMR" with my kid hugging my head is awesome or grossly irresponsible, but it sure was fun.
    3 points
  43. applied another light highlight layer to skin..its subtle not sure if it needs another one and then did the eyes mouth and hair.eyes are abit lopsided but turned out ok..as always one eye seems to just cometogether nicely and I struggle to get the other the same :) had to keep touching up the left side of his nose due to getting liner and white on it. on to pants now I think.
    3 points
  44. thought id share some shadowsea stuff i'd painted a long time ago here. these were the models that really got me to appreciate Olley's style; now im a fan.
    3 points
  45. Here are the figures I am starting on next And here are the last two moderns from the kickstarter
    3 points
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