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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/28/18 in all areas

  1. 02243: Robert O'Mannon sculpted by Bobby Jackson. Some time ago I said I would post a step-by-step of a tartan being painted. I've done the photos and here they are: Tartan Step by Step
    20 points
  2. Simple speed paint. All done except for the base. Edit: I've added my 2nd Cairn Wraith. I really liked Michael Proctor's example paint so I copied the color scheme for it.
    19 points
  3. This is the Ogre Smasher from Bones 3. I think all of the ogres from Bones 3 are awesome sculpts! This guy has a "hand" bag and likes to go clubbing.
    16 points
  4. Something I painted for a friend. This is tiefling #2 of 5 so far. Hoping that before he starts the new campaign that players may pick as their characters. A short work in progress can be found on my just for fun blog/website EYEDAMAGEART Fire and Ice!
    14 points
  5. Here is another miniature that I made for one of my Dungeons & Dragons campaigns. I tried to see if I could make a smoke effect using cotton. I think it came out pretty good.
    13 points
  6. Agreed. Thats at least the cost of an arm and a leg.
    13 points
  7. I finally got around to painting my bones owlbear. It's such a great sculpt that I was waiting to be inspired to tackle it and, well, the muse spoke. Just for fun I've also included some shots of a much older (1992?) Genedier owlbear that I painted up a while back. The older one has seem some table time and needs a touch up or two. :) The new owlbear is a bit tricky to get a good photo of.
    12 points
  8. I just started getting into miniature painting. This is the first miniature I've painted. I'm starting with the Heroquest figures and then moving on from there.
    11 points
  9. really fun sculpt. 9/10 would ruin again.
    11 points
  10. Antediluvian Miniatures Dungeons & Dragons is an American animated television series based on TSR's Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. A co-production of Marvel Productions and TSR, the show originally ran from 1983 through 1985 for three seasons on CBS for a total of twenty-seven episodes. The show focused on a group of six friends who are transported into the titular realm and followed their adventures as they tried to find a way home with the help of their guide 'Dungeon Master'. Hank, the Ranger Sheila, the Thief Bobby, the Barbarian Presto, the Magician Diana, the Acrobat Eric, the Cavalier Dungeon Master
    10 points
  11. I don't usually paint Warhammer miniatures, but there is a local painting contest which has very specific rules so I figured why not. I've never entered a painting contest before, so there is no time like the present. I've decided to carry on with my experiments in object source lighting and apply wht I've learned so far in this project. One of the big challenges will be doing the OSL in the metallic armour of the knight. I've never tried that before. The two figures are "Neave Blacktalon" and "Wight King". Here is my planned layout. The white line is to align their line of sight so they are looking each other in the eyes. The source of light will be a big glowing rune on the ground in between them. I chose these two figures becuase they both have cloaks that are blowing in the wind, but they are blowing in opposite directions. That means that when they are facing each other, the wind direction is consistent. I intend to make the grass be bent over in the same direction as well. The wind is blowing from the wight towards the knight. I am very tempted to name this project "Fus Ro..." That might not be genre appropriate though. I had some in progress shots of the base but I lost them somewhere. Drag and drop error, probably. I used milliput to make the rocky base. I used the base of another rocky miniature to make impressions to give it texture. The wight's foot is incorporated into his base, so I incorporated his whole base into the milliput mass. I sculpted the runes/rock circle into the milliput and then added sand to it. In the crevices. I made my first big mistake at this stage. I added the grass tufts too. I should have waited until after I primed the whole base and then painted the ground where the grass would be attached. My thinking was that the grass would look better if it was highlighted with the OSL effect in the same way as everything else. However, it has proven very difficult to get paint through the grass tufts to make them shadowed underneath. Other than that, I like the way it turned out. I prepainted the whole base using the stone greys triad. I highlighted the base with the greys and added white to get the areas that would be hit by the light from the rune to be brightest. Today I spent the morning painting the OSL effects onto the base. This lets me make sure the OSL on the figures and on the base will line up with each other and also be the same colours. I am using these for the OSL effect: Here is where I am at so far. The figures are beside the base on their cork handles so you can see how they will line up eventually. I need to darken the areas around the outside edge of the base a lot more still. It is actually a lot darker than it look in the picture already. I added progressively Nightshade Purple and Brown Liner to the Stone Grey for the shadow areas on the base.
    9 points
  12. This is an old Mage Knight figure that I slightly converted and repainted. He was holding a comically undersized flail in his left hand, so I cut it off and replaced it with a halberd from an old GW Chaos Warrior I had in my bits box. After that, it was just a matter of repainting him for use on the tabletop. He'll make an interesting BBEG in some game I haven't created yet. Thanks for looking.
    9 points
  13. your getting false Monday fallout from the States. Monday sometimes uses this as a tactic to hide until Tuesday and then strike the unsuspecting
    9 points
  14. 9 points
  15. Proud father moment. Daughter is cutting the lawns for spending money now because all of her chore money is going to her 8th grade class trip to DC. Lawns aren’t “her” chore, and she is desperate for cash when they head to Tokyo in a month. Disney pins from Tokyo Disneyland are calling, and she must have! Today she didn’t need to run back over the spots she missed. Level up!
    9 points
  16. The one I currently have. Common Sense. It's just too rare in the world anymore, and I just cannot bear such great responsibility much longer.
    8 points
  17. I have been completely unsettled the whole weekend. I think getting the huge drawing out on Friday has left a bit of a hole in my psyche. I keep thinking I need to work more on it, and feel guilty about going on vacation, but... I couldn't work anything on it until this Wednesday anyway. Hopefully, a week in an alpine area with put my feathers back in the right order. I keep them numbered for just this type of situation.
    8 points
  18. Pretty much anything that can't be turned off. The story of King Midas springs to mind....
    8 points
  19. I would not want a body made of nothing but (unending lengths of) rope. I don’t care what tricks I could do or numbers of foes I could lasso. (I have no idea who John Rozzum is...maybe he originated Ropeman?)
    8 points
  20. Omniscience. Why would I want to know about everybody else's problems?
    8 points
  21. Hubby and I have been playing a survival horror game called Dying Light. It's really fun, burns a lot of hours. But it made Hubby want to take a break from our regular dnd campaign and do a little Memorial Day two day game. So we rolled up some new characters for a modern setting (it still had magic, because it was set in his home brew world, just way in the future (spoiler alerts!)). I made a kobold sanitation worker (which I knew would doom me to being attacked by sewer zombies, but hey, I got to make some good screams). Ty (the kid) made a dwarven ice cream man! He was hilarious! And Bryan made a dragonborn marine. The game had all the highlights of a fun survival horror, creepy noises, an absence of people, bitey corpses, really bad smells. My favorite moment was when Bryan and I were demonstrating how a zombie on the stairs was trying to get to a hurt lady. Bryan was the zombie, laying part way up the stairs grabbing at my foot, me screaming and kicking at the "zombie". We got extra experience for that! Ty decided to drag the zombie down the stairs by its leg, which came off Anyway, all of our characters ended up at an orphanage, with all of our accompanying npcs unbitten! None of the orphans were hurt either. It turned out that the water supply (as well as the electrical grid) had been turned off. So we headed to the water station to see about unblocking it. There, we discovered that someone had sabotaged the water station. My character built a pipe bypass and we got water to the rest of the city again. As we did so, a bunch of black SUVs showed up and we got dragged off to the cells of "Parasol" corp We managed to break out, rescue the scientist who was the unwitting pawn of Parasol, and fight our way up to the research lab where the scientist performed a ritual that cleansed the entire city (at the expense of his life). While that was happening though, we had to fight a number of resident evil style "test subjects". It was pretty rough, and we almost lost a couple of NPCs, but we managed to get through it and get out before the spell finished. The ice cream dwarf drove us away like a bat out of hell I think he planned on keeping that humvee to make a new ice cream truck
    8 points
  22. Navel laser beams that make my belly ache.
    8 points
  23. Step 17 -- prepare to make a mess. It's okay -- it's all in the name of science, or art, or whoever. Next colour from the reference material is the white lines. However, pure white lines will be way to bright and ruin the overall effect. In fact, I have found that even an off white is far to bright. So for this pattern I chose Golden Blonde. For immersion purposes, I'm claiming that its because the sheep wool is slightly off white anyway. The process is the same as in the previous step, except now you are laying down the long thin lines in the middle of the fat blue stripes, neatly spaced in the middle between the two red lines. I found that if I drew the brush along very slowly, the movement of the brush and the surface tension of the paint pulled the pigment into a straight line behind the brush, even if it was a little uneven when it was first laid down as I pressed down on the brush. I feel like with more practice, it will get easier to make these lines smooth. You could stop now and be quite happy with the result, hey wait a minute, I'm done! He is still a bit shiny but the matte coat will sort that out. Thanks for reading along and I look forward to your comments, criticisms, suggestions and or questions. The final show off pictures are here:Robert O'Mannon
    8 points
  24. Step 15 Resist the call of the shelf of shame! It is time to start applying those dreaded very long, thin lines. I have tried various brushes and ways of thinning the paint to achieve this in the past. However, I want to mention that I watched one of the Hobby Cheating videos and found the answer (its called "How to paint sharp, thin lines"). I don't use ink, like he demonstrates, but I did use straight liquitext flowaid to thin the paint and I was really pleased with how it turned out. The issue is no longer thinning the paint, now its just keeping my hands steady. A couple of hints: Paint when you are well rested and well hydrated. Don't drink a ton of energy drinks right before doing this. Also, don't work out right before trying this! Your macro muscles will impose too much vibration over the micro muscles you use for this type of work. Also, don't mow the lawn! The after effects of using heavy equipment with a lot of vibration will make this kind of work very difficult if not impossible. Okay -- enough chat more painting lines. It actually gets very easy now. Yes, seriously. All the hard work is done. Because the pattern is laid out precisely, all you have to do is lay out the very thin lines parallel to the pattern. The freehand experts out there will probably have some very useful hints here. I found that long smooth brush strokes works a lot better than short precise strokes. Its ok for the line to not stay perfectly spaced between the existing lines of the pattern. It does not look good when you fail to accurately line up the ends of the lines when painting with short strokes. This is why it tends to look very splotchy in the deep recesses in the folds. I have to go back and fill in the gaps afterwards, sometimes with a different brush. By the way, for the long thin stripes I am using a Winsor&Newton Round #0 Series 7 (the standard length, not the miniature one). I am using the same brush, but the miniature one, to go back and fill in some of the gaps in the deep recesses. Hence the rough connections -- the two brushes don't have the same qualities and this compounds the problem of shaky hands. Horizontal lines applied first. These lines are blackened brown. Then the vertical lines. You could call him done here and be quite happy. Its tempting.
    8 points
  25. Step 9: Laying out the pattern for the vertical stripes. I laid out the vertical lines on the kilt at the same width and spacing as the horizontal lines, as per the reference material. Step 10: Converging vertical stripes on the plaid. The pattern has to wrap around to the inside of the plaid as well. I therefore chose to put the first vertical strip right on the left edge of the plaid as viewed from behind so that I would more easily be able to carry on the pattern inside the plaid without having to guess too much. I then continued the pattern at roughly equal intervals across the plaid. Note that this piece of fabric tends not to be folded and creased as precisely as the kilt, so I made the vertical lines slightly closer together than the spacing of the horizontal lines. Once I was happy with this placement, I carried on with this step and finished placing the vertical lines on the plaid. Note that the fabric is compressed at the top, so the lines converge and become very narrow, as does the spacing between the lines. I carried the first line right over the top of the shoulder and all the way to the waist on the front. Continuing the same line on the front. I then filled in the rest of the lines on this part of the plain as per the pattern. Step 11: Placement of the vertical strips around his waist. This is basically the same as doing the piece over the shoulder. The pattern is compressed in some places where the fabric looks 'squeezed'. Step 12: Highlighting of the vertical stripes all around the figure.
    8 points
  26. Ok, he didn't end up on my shelf of shame, so here comes the next step. Step 5: Select the position for the first line. I always start with a horizontal line with one of the fatter more easily painted colours. I always select the starting point so that I will be able to paint the complete pattern at that spot. This is important because I am going to use the starting point for a reference for everything else to keep the pattern the same size throughout and I will adjust the orientation of the pattern relative to this start point in areas where the fabric is curved, like the plaid over his shoulder. The pattern on a tartan is parallel to the hem at the bottom, always, even if it is out of alignment in other places. I therefore start the first line parallel to the belt line on the mini and therefore also (presumably) parallel to the hem. First Line: Step 6: Put on the rest of the horizontal lines from the pattern parallel to this first line. Note that the sculpt does not have to play by the rules of a real world fabric. It is more important to keep the lines from intersecting with the hem than to keep them parallel. I try to keep the lines basically parallel and may have them converge slightly if necessary, like close to the back of this figure with the second line (the one closer to the hem).
    8 points
  27. Guess who got a VM working that lets him play Diablo? THIS GUY! I've been playing for about 2 hours now, with most of that time being spent trying to figure out the timing for the dupe glitch again. I used to be able to do it without even trying back in the day, but after not playing the game on a regular basis for nearly 2 decades I've totally lost that ability. The struggle to cheat my way to riches in a game where money doesn't really matter past the first 10 character levels is real. But I gotta be able to dupe those stat elixers if they ever drop for me, and duping spellbooks is just about the only way to get spells of a decent level. I'm gonna get lost in this game for a while. Just the music is drowning me in nostalgia and overwhelming my senses. It's so great. I'd love it if Blizzard would get Matt Uelman to come back just to re-record all the music. I want note-for-note remakes without the early-90's limitations. Not only is the stuff wonderful for the game it's already in, it's great for tabletop games too.
    8 points
  28. Decided to go outside. It's a nice warm and sunny day with a light breeze. Just sipping on a cold brew mocha coffee and watching people. Two guys just finished a fist fight over parking and are being arrested by the police. Drinks and a show. Who would have thought it. ^.^
    8 points
  29. Again, puberty must be so weird for frogs. Tadpoles GROW LEGS AND LOSE A TAIL.
    7 points
  30. Across a shocked Froggy nation:
    7 points
  31. I think that this might explain the current popularity of smaller skirmish games like Frostgrave, Song Of Blades And Heroes, and so on. They're smaller (10 or 12 dudes as opposed to 10 or 12 units of dudes), and are figure neutral; use whatever figures you want. There also seems to be games out there that are following this example for mass battle games, too. Lion/Dragon Rampant by Osprey books are pretty good big battle games that aren't tied to any particular line of figures. Kings of War by Mantic is a hybrid of the two; they do make figures, but don't care overmuch what figures you use to play the game (at least that's how it used to be, I'm not positive if they'll change their stance as they make more figures to cover the holes in their line). I've never understood (nor followed) the theory that my 'x' figures are useless because the game is out of print now, or got written out of the current edition. Orcs are still orcs, skeletons are sill skeletons, space marines (if they have helmets on) could be used as robots, and so on. Playing sci-fi/fantasy wargames is supposed to be about using your imagination, stretch it a little further and find some alternate uses for those 'useless' figures.
    7 points
  32. I think with the fantasy and scifi games the issue is mostly that most rules sets are not written to be figure agnostic. With historical games, as long as you have figures in the right scale of the right type, all you need to do is base them properly, and you can play whatever ruleset is available. With a game like Infinity, say, there are only so many figures of cybernetic Japanese hacker dogs (if you can't tell I have no real experience with Infinity) and if the rules are revised to to sudden make your cybernetic Japanese hacker dogs illegal, then you feel put out. There is also the fact that in general, there seem to be many fewer F/SF players that play older versions of the rules. I'm always seeing battle reports (mostly yours Rob) of people playing older rulesets in the history genre, but not many people posting games of Vor or WHFB 1st edition.
    7 points
  33. Well, it actually isn't a Super Power, but I would not like to be able to strike a dramatic pose while wearing my underwear on the outside of tights & think I was cool. I have never been a fan of the Super Heroes.
    7 points
  34. China, too many mouths to feed. (What that not the super power your talking about?)
    7 points
  35. *GROAN* J/K haha Speaking of steep, I have been waiting to put my May pledge allotment in, and ALL month there has been ZERO shipping charges, so I was checking out what I was going to put in tomorrow, and lo and behold, 35 cents shipping????? wth, damn you USPS!
    7 points
  36. Step 16 -- If your hands are shaky, skip the next steps and just put him on your shelf of finished miniatures. Or, keep going and accept that its likely going to get very messy until you get practiced at applying those long thin lines. I encourage you to try this, its actually not that hard once you get an eye for it, it just looks a bit messy the first few times. Like this time! Ok, time to keep moving forward. The next colour on the reference pattern is the red. The red lines will border both sides of the wide blue stripes. This means you are painting twice as many red lines as all the blue lines you just painted. That's ok, it's good practice. If you just finished doing the brown lines, you are all practiced up and ready. Or, as in my case, you are tired and should probably take a break, rest your eyes, get a drink of water, etc. Either way, its all good. I started with the Carrot Top Red and thinned it with only Flow Aid. You can pretty much start anywhere you want, you just want to be systematic so you don't miss any spots. You could probably stop now and be quite happy, its tempting and maybe a good place to stop. He looks a little messy, but pretty good overall.
    7 points
  37. Step 13. I knew I would have to darken the blue squares where the blue lines intersect, so that is what happened next. I added a bit of blackened brown into the blue and then painted in all the squares. I was not too precise in this, mostly because my hands are not very steady at the moment. The messiness is not TOO noticeable though, because the contrast between the light blue/dark blue and the tan is not very high. Step 14. Apply Chestnut Gold glaze over everything except the dark blue squares. As noted above, the contrast is not very high, but it is still too high. This is a flat wool fabric and the colours should also be somewhat muted. So, I made a glaze of the Chestnut Gold using a mixture of water, flowaid and liquitex glazing medium and applied it. Note that the slodri and the glazing medium both make the finished surface a bit shiny. I will apply a matte coat over the whole thing when I am done. You could call him done at this stage and be happy. It's tempting.
    7 points
  38. Step 2: I painted everything else on the miniature first. Why? Because I can fix a splotch of white line on the skin, but it is much harder to fix a splotch of skin colour that gets on the finished tartan. So, I paint everything else first. I also do a bit of pre-shading and highlighting. The tartan is not a very reflective fabric, so the highlights are not going to be as bright as I would usually make them. Step 3: Prepare my palette with all the paint as per my plan from my notes. I am using a mix of 50% water, 25% liquitext flowaid and 25% liquitex slowdri (the white blob) for painting/blending the kilt and the first few thick lines. Then I am using pure liquitext flowaid (the big transparent blob in the middle right of the palette) to thin the paint for the very long, thin lines. Step 4 I paint the kilt in the tan colour. Shade, highlight, blend, the usual, just not as bright for the highlights. You could stop at this stage and call him done. It's tempting and he wouldn't even end up on the shelf of shame.
    7 points
  39. Totally unrelated, but in my youth we had a Parrot at home. A Green Amazone. He was mostly friendly and with me he developed a love/hate connection. Sometimes he let me pet him, other days he wanted to chew my fingers off. When I left the house he couldn't cope with the family being incomplete and he tore out his feathers. Poor thing. But..I have been thinking about him and his posture when he attacked. See? Birds seem to have evolved from the Dino predators, the two-legged kind. Now this parrot had a large vocabulaire, he could mimic us and he even commanded our dog that way. It was always fun to see the dog come running when the parrot shouted PASJAAAA HIIEEERRR!!!! ( Pasja come here!) Now what if the Green Amazone Parrot is a descendant from the T- Rex? He always reminded me of one, especially when he walked around on the floor and suddenly wanted to attack your toes.. Now what if the T- Rex had been able to mimic sounds like parrots? A young Triceratops hears his mother's voice, walks into the forest and becomes dinner. Now what if a T-Rex would meet men? I know they didn't but just for the fun of it... I can imagine a T-Rex calling it's prey. Tiffany! Come here Tiffany!!! MUNCH!!! Ok, I know, I'm weird... But I just thought this would be cool somehow.
    6 points
  40. That's a good point. Frankly, even telepathy is probably pretty rotten after the first few minutes.
    6 points
  41. SUPER-averageness. I already *have* that power, and it's at its most powerful when socializing with other people. Anyone know how to get rid of it?
    6 points
  42. May 28: What is a super power you would NOT want?
    6 points
  43. I just spent many hours playing Diablo, and then I just lost the last hour and a half of playing because I died and hadn't saved the game recently. And OG Diablo single players was pretty true to its roguelike roots in that regard. Death meant you lost all the equipment you were wearing, all your money, and any items you had stashed in town, or you lost however much progress you'd made since your last save. I chose the latter, because I had some pretty decent gear, the main piece of which was a reward from a quest that has about a 1 in 5 spawn chance. But playing it made me feel like I was 10 again. I just got lost in it, and I love it.
    6 points
  44. Yea, and that fertilizer is what birthed the banana peel joke. The banana peel isn't a banana peel, it's a turd. You just can't go about throwing horse turds around on stage during a vaudeville routine, so they had to improvise. Also, give it another 50 years and I'm betting we'll have self-driving cars that drive better than the majority of people ever could.
    6 points
  45. Now for some 1980s color on those clothes! I laid in some Red Oxide on the male Robo Hunter. Normally this is a fairly opaque color, but thinned down it lets the brown underneath show through. I laid in some Yellow Ochre on the Teen Robo Hunter's dress. Like Red Oxide, it is basically rust and fairly opaque, but here is thinned down so you can see the underpainting. I painted her glasses Titanium White (above) so I could make them look glowing green (below) with a wash of Phthalo Green just lightened with a touch of Titanium White. Working on hair, alternating grey highlights mixed from Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Sienna, and Titanium White, and glazes of Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Umber mixed to a near-black. I also added eyebrows (Carbon Black) and purple eyeshadow (Quinacridone Magenta, Ultramarine Blue, and Titanium White) to her.
    6 points
  46. I completed this little project right before starting the Big Cthulhu, and it was a bit of a test bed for it. I used the Bonesylvanians Lou for the cthulhu. Fun little project, The tiny town gave me no end of trouble and it took forever to place all the little buildings, the seascape came out well. More detail shots if your interested https://othikent.deviantart.com/art/Little-Cthulhu-Rising-Detail-Diorama-742812255 I'd love to know what you think.
    6 points
  47. Lisbon, Portugal. Wapping Old Stairs, London, England. *EDIT* And a brief article on 19th Century urine deflectors - that redirected the stream toward the feet of the offender. I found it rather disturbing to learn that the earlier urinals were located outside of the pubs and taverns, rather than indoors. The Auld Grump - you learn something new every day, even if you don't want to....
    6 points
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