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Cerridwyn1st

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Everything posted by Cerridwyn1st

  1. I hope this doesn't sound hokey, but you know the plastics make some of the armies even less expensive. Also more demo-friendly. Metal elf archers are very delicate, but plastic ones? Not so much. A unicorn for $5.99? Put it on a Cavalry base, add a little flocking, an you're done. Really, if they keep putting minis from Warlord out as plastics, it will be possible to have newbie-proof, inexpensive demo armies. What's not to love about that?
  2. I'm preparing for Mega Convention 2009. If you would like information about the painting activities, you can go to the Paint and Take Website.. For more information about Mega Convention itself, go to the convention website. Still in the planning stages, but we will have Paint and Take, classes and a painting contest this year. Reaper is one of our sponsors and has been our first and most generous supporter. I hope to see some of you guys there. Melanie
  3. Hello! The mini came in the mail yesterday. She's beautiful! Now I just have to find someone to play Warlord with. I intend to user her as my Druidess. BTW, Meg, I really like the way you flocked the base. Very subtle. It looks like you took my comments about basing into consideration and created something I'd like, not just something that's pretty. Thank-you! Now I just have to get mine done. Oy.
  4. Additional notes on two-part epoxies: Brown stuff, Green Stuff and White Stuff are all made by the same company, Polymetic Systems. The correct name for the products is Kneadatite. Brown Stuff is an aluminium mix that cure very hard. Green stuff is not as stiff but can be easily carved once it is cured. White Stuff is flexible when cured, which makes it inadiquate for most modeling uses. Procreate is a fairly new product; it has been on the market about two years now. When you see "Greens" that are actually grey, the've been sculpted with Procreate. Apoxysculpt comes in a wide variety of colors, though the most common are white and grey. It is water soluble, so the curing time can be extended by kneading in a little water. It also comes in a paste form. In all cases, sculpting materials are usually too soft when first mixed to be easily sculpted. It is best to allow the products to cure about 30 minutes before sculpting. Often sculptors will different products, achieving something with properties of both. It can also be done to "stretch" an expensive material with a less expensive one. An example would be mixing Apoxysculpt and Kneadatite, then using this to "bulk up" the sculpt. Finer details would be added later with Kneadatite.
  5. Additional notes on two-part epoxies: Brown stuff, Green Stuff and White Stuff are all made by the same company, Polymetic Systems. The correct name for the products is Kneadatite. Brown Stuff is an aluminium mix that cure very hard. Green stuff is not as stiff but can be easily carved once it is cured. White Stuff is flexible when cured, which makes it inadiquate for most modeling uses. Procreate is a fairly new product; it has been on the market about two years now. When you see "Greens" that are actually grey, the've been sculpted with Procreate. Apoxysculpt comes in a wide variety of colors, though the most common are white and grey. It is water soluble, so the curing time can be extended by kneading in a little water. It also comes in a paste form. In all cases, sculpting materials are usually too soft when first mixed to be easily sculpted. It is best to allow the products to cure about 30 minutes before sculpting. Often sculptors will different products, achieving something with properties of both. It can also be done to "stretch" an expensive material with a less expensive one. An example would be mixing Apoxysculpt and Kneadatite, then using this to "bulk up" the sculpt. Finer details would be added later with Kneadatite.
  6. "Gap Filling" is a property of some glues which means it does not need a lack of air to cure. It will help to glue pieces together even if they don't fit tightly together, hence the "gap filling" property. "Sealing between layers" refers to giving a mini a thin coat of sealant to protect what has already been done. Necessary for some brands of paint that rub off easily. EX: Vallejo Model Color. This process is also used to seal work that has been done before applying a step that my need to be removed to correct an error, such as freehand. By sealing the mini, it is possible to gently remove or correct something that isn't working quite right without destroying the layers underneath. "Pins" are the material inserted into a joint to make it stronger. Examples of pinning material are dressmaker's pins or sewing needless, brass rod, floral wire, and paperclips. Dressmaker's pins and sewing needles are both made of spring steel and can bear a lot of weight. Use these materials for joints that need to bear a lot of stress, such as large limbs, dragon wings, etc. Brass rod and floral wire can both be bought in a wide range of sizes, called a "guage". As they have some flexibility, they work best for joints where you may need a little wiggle room to get the pieces to hold together. Because of the wide range of sizes, they can be used for even the smallest bits, such as a hand or fairy's wing. While many adherents swear by paperclips, there are better materials available. As mentioned before, Cyanoacrylate glues or "superglue" is the most common glue used for assembly by painters. This product comes in a wide variety of thicknesses, from super thin to gel-like. In general, the thinner the glue the faster it will cure and the weaker the bond. Super thin glues are excellent for "dry fitting" models and for sticking a model with in integral base to a painting gig. It is easy to break apart pieces with this glue. Thicker glues take longer to cure but may give better hold and gap filling. Of all glues used, Zap-a-gap with a green label is by far the most popular. It is of medium thickness so it will cure fairly quickly with good hold and gap filling properties. It is the most popular brand/formulation sold in Gaming Stores. "Blotting" is the act of stroking a loaded brush on an absorbent surfact to remove excess paint and return it to a point. Materials for blotters can be paper towels, spounges, or my favorite, cut-up old t-shirts. The blotter may be wet or dry when used. "Wet Pallet" is any container that has a layer of sponge-like material with a semi-impervious paper on it. The sponge can be thin sponge, paper towel or cloth. The paper may be special "Wet Pallet" paper or baker's parchment. A flat containter that can be sealed air-tight is best. The containers can range from a plastic sandwich box to a large, expensive specially-made wet pallet such as the "Painter's Friend". "Welled Pallet" refers to a plastic or ceramic plate with depressions called "wells". Many painters prefer a ceramic welled pallet over plastic, as it is easier to clean and keeps the paint liquid longer.
  7. This may seem odd to those of you who like music in the background, but I kind of like painting in quiet. It's less distracting for me. That, and I have so much background noise at work that a little quiet is welcome.
  8. Hey, just for comparison, could we see a mini you did with craft paints? I'm currious how much of a difference the MSPs made for you. It's a very nice mini. I'd never know it was your first try at basing if I wasn't told.
  9. It never hurts to keep a couple oldies but goodies so you can see how far you've come. Maybe the frog guy, for example. I've tried Pine Sol as a stripper, but I prefer Simple Green.
  10. Hey, Meg. She looks great! I think she'll be put into service in my Warlord Army as the Elvin Druidess. I like what you are doing with the skin. It's great you started dark and gave yourself more contrast there. Very nice looking brown hair as well. You may be pushing outside your comfort zone, but it's a good change. I guess this means I have to get off my behind and finish upt the Elf Lord, huh? Mel
  11. Just for reference, a tortie has no white. A cat with red, black and white is a calico, not a tortoiseshell. Painting a tortie could be a real challenge, as the red tends to be in very small splotches. This is my tortie, Spunky. Her face is almost half and half. Her mother was really cool; her face was in quarters of red and black, almost like a checkerboard.
  12. I drop them, loose little bits, have them knocked over by my cats, or just knock them off myself. It's a wonder I get anything done.
  13. VV, I especially like the look of the metals on this one. Very nice.
  14. Thanks for the support, everyone. I received an email from a breeder of Patterdale Terriers. I had emailed him about my dog: Melanie, Hello.I am very sorry to hear about your losing Robin.I know what it is to lose a loved pet.Over the years we have lost many,due to different circumstance,and you never get used to it,each time it still hurts.On our site you will see a picture of "Skeet aka VooDoo Princess".She was my sister's dog,and her daughter used to dress her up,play with her,and she went wherever my sister and her family went.She was guarding my sister from a mastiff that approached,and the mastiff broke her back,my sister and her kids were crushed.We gave them a granddaughter to Skeet,and while they love her(Daisey),she can never replace Skeet.What a lot of folks don't understand when getting a pet,is that while you enjoy many,many good times with them,it hurts terribly to lose them.Thank you for the kind words about our dogs.I hope over time you feel better,and just enjoy the fun that Robin brought you when she was with you, craig/J&J I do want to remember the good times with my dog. In that spirit, here's a list of ways to know you've got it bad with your pets: You know you've got it bad when: ... you can list numerous restaurants with verandas where you can take your dog when you eat out ... not only do you take your pet, but it gets its own entree ... the restaurant with a veranda has a menu for pets ... you know your pet's favorite toy, treat, and game, and employ this knowledge daily ... your household budget for toys, food and treats is as much as you spend on gas ... you get holiday gifts for your pet as well as family members ... your pets take your SA's place in bed, and you let them ... answering machine greetings and holiday cards include the name(s) of your pet(s) ... you refer to your pets as "kids"
  15. Heisler is right about weathering kits. A friend of mine gave me a bunch of chalks for railroad and historical models when he switched to using powdered chalks. No grinding, just use them right out of the package. I think Tamiya makes a weathering kit with powdered chalks. Probably cheaper to pick up individual pastels at an art store, though.
  16. Another hint for speedpainting: do the whole unit at once. Line your guys up and paint all of each of the areas together. That way you don't loose painting time waiting for things to dry. Just pick up the next troop in the line and keep moving. You can also make up a varnish mix. Some swear by Minwax but I use a mix of Plaid Walnut stain, Modge Podge matte and water. Seals and shadows in one step. Put the minis on a stick and dip them in the mix. Shake or spin to remove excess. Once dry, apply another coat of your favorite sealing and you're done.
  17. I often mix paint and ink, because I like the consistency of the mix. I wouldn't describe liners as being between a paint and an ink. They are paint, but with extra flow improver. They behave a little differently than the other colors, but they are still paints.
  18. What PTF said. Brown Liner is da bomb. There is another use for the liners that hasn't been detailed yet. Often I find that I'd like the shadow color of a triad to be a bit darker than it is. A corresponding liner color will darken the shadow without making it muddy. You should give that a try as well, especially if you own all or most of the liner colors. Also, Spike, since the liner colors flow a bit better than regular paints, you may find it easier to darkline with them.
  19. Thank you. I would probably adopt an adult dog, like I did with Robin. They can be harder to place than puppies, since everyone has that "aw, cute" response. Robin was already houseboken when I got her and integrated easily into the rest of the family. I have a friend who works with Welsh Terrier rescue. I may either get a dog through him or a rescue through the Patterdale Terrier association.
  20. Debonder works if the pieces are attached with Superglue. With plastic figures, some glues littlerally "melt" the pieces together, fusing them. The bond is actually stronger than the plastic around it. If the piece breaks, it will break on the plastic, not on the join. Of course, you could always try some debonder and see if it works. If it does, the pieces were assembled with a glue that did not fuse them. If not, well, you're stuck
  21. Sorry, guys, when I posted I didn't realize I was logged in as Sivrel. He's my son and we share a computer. I was the one who let Robin get away from me this mornining, not him.
  22. I use a porcelain beading tray, like the ones available from Fire Mountain Gems. I bought mine at a bead store for around $5. They are fairly inexpensive, but I've also got a plastic "petal" style pallet. I'd recommend any pallet you buy have sloping wells. This will force the paint to stay together as your puddle gets smaller. It helps keep the paint fluid. If you have a pallet like the beading tray, it's flat so you paint can dry out faster, since it spreads out.
  23. The pattern? The texture is part of the sculpt. I can't take creadit for anything but the highlighting. Dude, it still looks nice. You could paint to allow the pattern to show through or not.
  24. Just remember, Ishil, if you shoot the Moon and miss, you are still among the stars.
  25. How could they tell what manufactures paint you used..do a paint scrapeing and analize it? No you can pretty much use what ever manufactures paint you want on your models, whats more important is that you paint a high quality model that fits with in the Games Workshop universe if in fact your entering a GW Golden Demon Also I think a 60 color palet is plenty enough paint to paint a winning miniature with. In fact Ive seen more than one winning entry do it with a 20 color palet or less. Don't get me wrong..I love paint..I may be one of the largest paint whores around.. Ive got more paint than any sane person should have..yet I still find my self limited to the same 20-30 color palet or even less. I know Reaper, Vallejo, P3, GW Foundry...and so on are in the business to sell paint but having 60 plus triads of paint does not make you a better painter..or one that wins contests. Some of the best painted miniatures Ive ever seen were by Derek Schubert and contained 3-4 colors. Get this.. this summer sitting in a painting class by Jeremie Bonamant I learned how to create and paint flesh tones.. with out a single bottle of paint with the word flesh in it..it was all done by mixing paint.. amazing.. What Im trying to get at, is winning contests isnt about having the best brand of paints, using the current styles, having the ideal medium mixture or having the latest miniature releases. Its all about good painting and using the materials you ave available to their best ability.For example Scott Bowser won his first slayer sword in Baltimore with Apple Barrel Paints, what most here would conside poor quality paints. My advice to you Meg is pick a category your most comfortable with, choose some models and talk with people whos opinions you feel matter and get the proper information to make your entry shine. Then sit down and paint. As to what ultimately wins the day of the show..it can only be what showed up. So if you feel a winner in a certain year was of poor quality.. well thats what showed up this year. Ive always said the quality of the Golden Demons in the US began to get thinned down ad GW added more shows. If you just had one big show you wuld see a much higher level of entries. Theres only so many people who paint, divide them by that many shows and it just means a smaller turn out. One of the things we tried to do with thr whole "Team North America" and the Primarch project at Chicago Demons was to bring attention to painting and the level it could achieve in North America. And guess what It got noticed. Were already hearing about more people who want to come to Chicago next year now knowing that we intend on repeating with a new project. Many of the Team Montreal painters are now talking of coming down next year for Chicago after the success Mathieu Fontaine had and the report he returned with at how well he was welcomed and accepted at that show.. So in my opinion Chicago 2008 could very well be one of the best shows in the US in the last 10 years and I hope it brings out the best..especially many people from this list like Anne, Doug Jones, Jen and Liliana ..So Meg if you want to test your skills.. come to Chicago in July ;) Jeff Wilhelm You know, Jeff, sometimes I feel like I'm in the armpit of the painting universe. There are so few good painters here and so few venues to promote painting. GD Atlanta bought the farm; so much for that venue to promote painting. I've been working with MegaCon to promote painting. It's just slow going when you've got one shot per year to do some good. It's mainly and Anime/Comics convention. It's a major undertaking to open the show up to gaming. On the other side of the coin, there are quite a few IPMS shows in this area. Fantasy/Sci-Fi/Horror comprise the fastest growing category for IPMS shows.
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