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SaintRigger

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Posts posted by SaintRigger

  1. Am I understanding that with a flamer you can drop a string and bend it around to fit your whim?

     

    So for example, 3 CAV end up in a row- like a baddie, one of your mates and another baddy.. like this: U B M B

     

    You can just drop a string and curve it around and completely miss your mate? Or in another situation, just whip it around to hit only enemies in a big furball? (Provided they aren't in melee)

     

    This just seems like weird and unrealistic behavior for a flamer in my mind... more like a guided monofilament whip or something...

     

    I think a flamethrower should be a straight line, or a teardrop shaped template as that is how it behaves, and it reflects the dangers of unleasing a torrent of flaming fuel in the direction of baddies and possibly your friend. Adds an element of strategy as far as positioning units and makes you think if you really want to do that or not. I do like the fact that it kills tough infantry and causes a dis check if it doesn't. (noone likes to be lit on fire)

     

    Or simply refer to it as a different weapon system. Any other thoughts?

  2. Ook! Major pet peeve! It's not "Wah-la" it's "Voila It's like nails on a chalkboard. :)

     

    Here are some technical pointers - DChihorn covered image adjustment nicely. If you don't have access to photoshop, some of us here do and are willing to help adjust the curves and levels.

     

     

    I'm the last person to say this (gleefully using paint from the bottle)- but you'll get smother coverage if you thin your paints. What color do you use as a primer? It looks like white. Some neat techniques are using a really thinned down wash of walnut to shade flesh, and give seperate between skin and fabric, or armor pieces. This will help give the model more definition and isn't as harsh as using black.

     

    Her tabbard looks really nice. :) The armor can use a bit more highlighting. As Kellyn will say "Highlight it untill you think it looks good and then add two more levels"

     

    Also, the flocking for the base is a bit rough and uniform. What you might want to try is hit it with some thinned down black paint and give it a nice coating - then give it a drybrushing of brown (or a few shades) and highlight subtly with a drybrushing of ivory for a neat muddy/rocky looking base. You can also use static grass, or other basing materials to make it pop.

     

    I really dig the colors used :) What made you decide to mount her on a hex base?

  3. Heyas,

     

    Does anyone have suggestions for an inexpensive and easy to use/clean airbrush? I don't want it for mini painting, (well, possibly 15mm armor) ... but want it for applying camo patterns to 28mm armor, models and aircraft (and rockets).

     

    I've never used one - so I'm a total noob here

  4. Thanks for the reply. As far as actual painting I do about the same as you just without the drybrushing. It just takes me a long time to get the base color on, even using a #4 flat brush. I do about the same as far as any different colors on the model too, not to many. I dunno,maybe I'm just slow. ::D:

    The secret here is overbrushing. It's like drybrushing, except you have more paint on your brush, and the brush can be a bit wet. It will give you a decent basecoat quite quickly. Then drybrush on the highlights.

  5. This will probably drive people nuts, but when I'm fired up - it takes me about 40min to ah hr to finish a CAV, minus drying time.

     

    First thing I do is clean and glue the CAV together (except for special occasions, like really big, overhangy monsters like the ogre which I'll do in pieces). I then use white glue to add sand to the base. This I'll let sit overnight to dry, I usually do 'em in batches so I have some ready.

     

    Next I'll give 'em an undercoat of black primer (again in batches) and I'll let them dry overnight, unless I'm being really impatient.

     

    That is the slowest part for me.... What I'll do next is pick a base color and give it an overbrushing with a 1" (or larger) flat brush. Then I'll pick a suitable highlight and hit the model with a drybrushing, usually using a 1" round brush. This whole procedure takes about 10 minutes total time, and is enough to do most of the model

     

    Once that is done, I'll paint on details, likes the cockpit, metal bits, checkers and stripes, other weapon systems - so figure 20-30 min.

     

    Then I like to add various decals, so about 10 min.

     

    You can see my CAVs and tanks in my Gallery here.

     

    The hardest thing for me is to not get distracted and start other projects. :)

  6. I've got a small group of games that are older - but I find myself pulling them out time and time again, and they are still as entertaining as when I first started playing them. Mostly new games hold my attention for a little while and then thats it - but these are classics I keep going back to.

     

    Here is my list of what I find myself playing over and over -

     

    1) Diablo II - every few months I pull this gem out, whip up a new character and go through it over and over - not even so much as to complete it, but just to play. I've also taken to playing with inventory editors so I can screw around with what I have.. ie add sockets to various weapons I find, clone gems etc... and it becomes even more fun for me.

     

    2) Fallout 2 - I've been through it numerous times, but I still find it's fun to pull out every 6-8 mos. Fallout 1 is good also, but 2 is the best. Tactics is so-so.

     

    3) GTA: Vice City. I never get tired of blaring 80's music and doing drivebys on the beach from a moped. Never. I've probably wasted hunderds of hours on the game and only accomplished enough to give me access to the whole city.

     

    4) Warcraft 3. My life for the hoard. Again, just doesn't get old.. all of Blizzards games are like that.

     

     

    SO what about you guys - what never gets old videogame wise.

  7. I've always been pretty lucky with falling into jobs that I really love .. but I totally feel for you. A non-trivial population of my friends are currently unemployed and it's really rough, there isn't much out there right now.

  8. I would think that if you were to build up trench boards, you might as well just build them straight away from foam with edges that line up (a la rivers on modular terrain boards). They won't interlock... so maybe the edges of the matts woulc come in handy there.

     

    The matts are also great for those who have demo or display booths at cons, since alot of time you are on hard concrete - and unless you are used to standing on your feet for 8 hours in such an environment - it's really unpleasant.

  9. A few days ago, the reviews on Rotten Tomatos was pretty much universally rubbish.

     

    While as a historical dork, I can appreciate accuracy - it's unforgivable in a film for entertainment purposes... otherwise, might as well just make a documentary.

  10. I hid a lawn gnome in the back yard.

     

    I think when we get around to re-landscaping the front yard at our place, we are going to make a really nice garden setting, and I'll hide a lawn gnome in a ghillie suit someplace in it... so if you know it's there, it's obvious, otherwise it's really well hidden.

     

    Ghillie suits, another scottish invention ;)

  11. I admit to know this guy, who once bought a New Kids on the Block CD. I ... ermm He was young and foolish and trying to impress a girl who loved them. Remember this is not me we're talking about but someone I once heard about.

    That is rough... I think your friend should report for re-education.

     

    Some things are just inexcusable. ;)

  12. Ah, this is why it's good to partition your drive.

    I put windows in /C:

    Programs in /D:

    Data in /E:

     

    That way if I have a virus I can merely format /C: and reinstall, then reinstall your Programs. Put all your music and Documents in /E: and you shouldn't loose anything.

    Sure... unless a program with hidden malware you install on D: makes a registry change to C: which refers to a DLL it hid on E....and it makes sure all aspects of itself are running...

     

    You re-install and re-install and wonder why it doesn't go away ;)

     

    However, keeping a small partition for OS (or better yet a seperate small drive for just the OS, say a 20G) and then Data and programs someplace else is a good practice to prevent against corruption, and to make sure the OS runs more efficiently and quickly.

     

    Best thing is to set up your machine exactly the way you want it from scratch, get everything you want the way you like it - and then create an image of it as backup. Then if you hose your system, or just want to start again, you can flatten and re-image the drive, update and you are good to go.

  13. HijackThis! Is actually a tool that lists browser addons, buttons and other various programs and is used as an anti-spyware/anti-Malware program, and isn't something you "catch"

     

    I'd suggest downloading Spybot Seek and Destroy and AdAware, and running them both. It sounds like you hit something that left a modified registry entry behind to change your start page in IE. (A good way to avoid these is to avoid IE)....

     

    But either way, these program should help find the modified keys and set them back to their default.

     

    Lavasoft's Adaware: http://www.lavasoftusa.com/software/adaware/

     

    Spyboy Search and Destroy:

    http://www.safer-networking.org/en/index.html

     

    Info on HijackThis!:

    http://www.tomcoyote.org/hjt/

  14. You can make cobblestone really easily by cutting up a cereal box into cobble stone sized pieces and gluing them to whatever your prefered road basing material may be.

     

    Then basecoat, dry-brush and voila! Road. Very time consuming (the cutting stones part) , but quite rewarding and it is a very nice finish.

     

     

    For rivers, use a piece of masonite, or other prefered basing material... build up some subtle banks using insultation foam, undercoat, flock and then paint up and glaze the river with a gloss sealant, or if you really wanna get hardcore, a think coat of clear resin.

     

    This however will cost more than the $3.99 roads in craft stores.

     

     

    OR..... you can go by the old wargamer standby and cut strips out of brown and blue felt and have an instant river and road.

     

     

    Here we have forces crossing a river during the ECW

    100_0064_IMG.jpg

  15. I'm currently in the middle of "Achtung Panzer!" by Heinz Guderian which is the first written work on the theories of armored and mechanized warfare.

    Not quite Ludendorfs "total war" was the first ::P:

    Also there were quite a few theoretisists at this point in time debating armoured warfare, so old Heinz isn't that special really, what about Liddell Hart and Fuller ?

    The brits did write some various papers on the idea of tank warfare, but nothing really formalized. Guderian draws alot from these papers and consolidates it down to a more concrete idea on orginization... so while there was some genreal theory floating around England at the time, but after the first world war - interest in them petered out in England and the US. Germany did learn valuable lessons, however and this is what makes their early armored advances in WWII so successful. Fuller wasn't able to convince the British army of the merits of mechanized warfare.

     

    Total War referes to the political motivation is used to rally the resources of a country (Kind of like what is going on in the US lately).. so while he has some interesting ideas on using policy as a war tool, and the idea of a vast mobilization of a country's assests for a land war became obsolete as soon as we dropped the bomb on japan.

     

    I can understand your arguement to some degree, and will agree that they did write papers first, but I still think that Guderian was the first to effectively formalize treatsies on modern mechanized warfare and apply them in practice. The reason I don't "count" Liddle or Hart is because while their ideas are quite good, they were largely ignored untill after the fact. (Although not ignored by Rommel and Guderian)

     

    Once could say that DaVinci was the first to invent the helicopter, parachute... and tank... but he isn't given the credit for them because he wasn't able to effectively manifest his ideas. Charles Babbage isn't credited with infenvting the computer... but his ideas are sound and the difference engine would work - were he able to build it.

     

    But then we are getting way off topic of the "What are you reading"

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