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Rainbow Sculptor

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About Rainbow Sculptor

  • Rank
    Enlightened
  • Birthday 12/26/1988

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    https://www.facebook.com/moonlitminis/

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    Female
  • Location
    Texas

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  1. @TaleSpinner Just saw the print from that figure with the scale armor I did with a similar IMM brush. Turns out there were very small holes between scales that didn't get properly filled in because I couldn't really see them. To correct my model (and potentially yours) I'm going to fill the whole area with a sphere then trim dynamic away everything that shows on the surface and dynamesh it all together. That way any hidden gaps/holes get filled and there aren't any printing issues.
  2. To elaborate a little on what Derek @dks was suggesting about the arms: we often need or want to exaggerate arms as a feature in particular but in order to keep them feeling realistically usable and recognizable for the viewer there's a couple easy "checks" I do. 1. Make sure both arms/legs have the same proportion. (Shoulder to elbow, elbow to wrist, hip to knee, knee to ankle) 2. The elbow should fall at the same height as the smallest point in the waist and wrists end roughly at the pelvis. This is artwork by Nicholas Kole for the comic Wingfeather Saga. Although each character has vastly different body types and proportions he is still maintaining the general rule that elbows fall at the smallest point in the waist and wrists fall roughly at the pelvis. To compensate for the enlarged arms the rest of the figure has been adjusted to fit within these guidelines. 3. I always have to break down hands by the blocks/shapes that make up each component. I find that animators and cartoonists are great resources to study for understanding how to break those complex forms down into something understandable and usable. Here's a study by Mitch Leeuwe of breaking down hands. I find his simplification easy to apply to a variety of hand poses. Hope that helps :)
  3. These are super cool! Great job!
  4. I know Patrick Keith does this method as well. I used to mark the outer corners with a pin prick so it just made two little small holes and then used my C shaped clay shaper to indent the upper and lower lids lines. I found the softer and uniform curve I got from the tool made eyes I liked better than the exacto blade. Very similar but I thought I'd add my two cents haha
  5. The current plan is to get him in a simple two piece mold so there wouldn't be any assembly required. However, the position of the bracers is not accidental and would allow for a pretty simple mod for those wanting to rotate the hands.
  6. If I have something quick to throw together I will cook. If not I'll just pick up a pizza or bucket of chicken to feed everyone.
  7. Now that I think of it Gene showed me that as well and I completely forgot it because I was absorbing so much info at the time and hadn't used it. haha I usually have the opposite problem, I'll have an unusually small model for some reason and have to double the canvas size and redraw it out. I really wish Z was more consistent about that sort of thing. My husband is excited about this one, he has a fondness for this particular monster type.
  8. Looking much more natural with the current edits! Sizing always seems to be one of those weird after thoughts or troublesome parts for me. Though I don't work Low to High poly I could probably measure the base rig before I pose it. Good thinking!
  9. That looks like it would print really nicely! Going to have to look into this method.
  10. Finished up Monster's arctic fox friend, Firn. This was such a fun project and I'm really excited to see @Hollymonster paint these cuties up!!
  11. Today we're getting started on Monster's little arctic fox friend! The beginning steps for animals are pretty much the same as people. I create a ZSphere rig with the proportions I want, pose it, then "Make PolyMesh3D" and start blocking in "anatomy" or in this case fur bulk with the clay builder brush. From here I'll be using mostly the orb crack brush to define the facial features and start creating layers/clumps of fur.
  12. I think this is how Andrea does it too and his scales come out really nicely. When I did Shadowthorn (the little kid dragon) I think I used mostly orb crack and polish (because I didn't know about hPolish at the time haha)
  13. All finished up! Thanks for all the feedback and support guys, this has been a fun set to create!!
  14. Really loved this back story so I gave her shorter stockings to maintain the sheer painting opportunity but added the twin daggers. Pending art director approval there's just some polish work left to do to get this one all finished up!
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