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Hells_Clown

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Posts posted by Hells_Clown

  1. I don't know what the figures in question look like, but you could try melting them off. Either place over a flame or heat up a paper clip or the like and melt it down enough to allow you to use cutters or just break it off with your hand.

     

    A more involved solution, but it might work.

  2. Usually when I paint something black (which is rare these days), I use Vallejo Gray-Black (or Black-Gray, I can never remember which...) and highlight up with gray. Though I have experiemented with mixing aDark blue and highlighting with blues. Both work well, just depends on what effect you're looking for.

     

    Now shading white, that's just as difficult.

  3. I've really enjoyed using Techstar Snowflakes for my winter bases; it's a microballoon plastic product that looks fantastically in scale. It is somewhat translucent but can be built up with multiple layers using superglue, just like sand or flock. Doesn't give a good 'fluffy' look, though, so it may not be what you're looking for.

    Where dost thou aquire said stuff oh Lady of the Paint?

  4. If ya can't see it, don't paint it.

     

    The eyes on that model are so far behind the cowl you could get away with just painting the eye area darker and give him that imposing deep stare.

     

    I'm prolly gonna redo my version soon and don't think I'll bother with painting the eyes either.

  5. I'm working on a figure now who's holding a book and was thinking about what to put in it (if anything, my free hand sucks like a shop vac).

     

    This might come in handy.

     

    Lil miss Enchantra is always so helpful, ain't she? ::D:

  6. Alex!

     

    It's great to see you've shown your face and shared about how you did that piece. I told you people wanted to hear it from *you* and not someone else. ::P:

     

    Folks, Alex Glocka is a phenomenal painter. If you ever have a chance to look at his work in person, or speak to him at a convention, you won't be sorry. He's just that cool.

     

    Reaper Ivy

    Layout Chick, and Alex fan ::):

    Does anybody UNcool work with or associate with Reaper?

     

    All the Reaper folks seem like cool dudes and dudettes, the gues painters seem cool, the sculptors seem cool...

     

    And best of all, I hang here on the boards! ::D:

     

    Reaper just exeudes cool.

     

    HC

    Cool Dude

    :devil:

  7. Yeah I have to say that's an impressive piece o work there. I've tried doing a similiar job on my version but it looked like...well, let's say I wasn't happy with the result. After looking at the pic again I see some things I missed and will have to go back and repaint.

     

    You mentioned using blue-gray tints but I don't see the blue. Just looks dark to me. Though I'm so tired I can barely stand it, so maybe I'll check back tomorrow and look again. :lol:

  8. Wow. I see things like that, and then I truly realise I need to go stab my face off. It's so good, I'm almost discouraged.

     

    --lstormhammer

    How 'bout we inept painters just get together somewhere and set up a huge bonfire and go out in a (literal) blaze of glory? :bday:

  9. somewhat off topic but whenever you see scrolls and books they are always old and yellowed. Weren't they ever new? I know some paper has a natural yellow tint to it, especially when it's crudely made and not refined, but they don't always have to be falling apart do they? ::P:

  10. Leave us not forget that horns, antlers, bones, etc will color and react differently once removed from the animal then they do while still attached.

     

    The discoloration seen is due to aging, weathering and not having the oils, etc from the living animal going there to keep them in working order.

  11. Well since I rediscovered the other thread on this video this one is moot but I was saying that it was nice to finally see someone do this type of highlighting (glass or otherwise) and not just read a description. To see where to add the next layer of highlight, how to go about covering mistakes, etc.

     

    Having the visual as well as the audio makes it easier for me to understand.

  12. Heh, and here I posted another thread about this one.

     

    I finally watched it and thought it was good. Though after seeing twice now it still looks like magic. You dab some paint here-n-there and in moments there's this awesome paint job.

     

    But at least I now have a real life example to follow. Verbal descriptions only go so far, it's nice to see the process in action.

     

    Keep it up and please do more!

  13. What is it you want?, Anne doing a series of readily downloadable vids on every major technique involved in miniature's painting?.

     

    Or did I understand something different? ::P:

    I'm saying that this short demo is (for me) better than whole volumes of written info.

     

    "Paint the surface with color A then highlight with color B" doesn't help me.

     

    Mayhaps I'm a useless carbon based life form or maybe I learn differently from others.

     

    It's an alternative way of demonstrating a technique is all.

  14. It seperates because the pigment is a powder that is mixed into the paint, it does not mix in like, say, Kool-Aid or sugar (oh, what, same thing :;): ). Instead, what you are using is pretty much fine power in a functional liquid suspension containing binders.

     

    The more you thin the paint, the more you are spreading out this powder.

    Higher quality (not always higher priced!) paints have the higher pigment density that allows them to be thinned more without the grainy look.

     

    The crappy-er brands use less pigment and coarser pigment, thus thinning results in the pigment showing it's self all over your peice.

     

    This is one of the reasons that I like the water based airbrush colors on the market, they have to have a fine dense pigment, otherwise clogged brushed and/or weak colors, plus they are already thinned in many cases.

     

    And all answers are dependent upon the type of paint, I only answered in relation to the water based acrylics you asked about.

     

     

     

    Too much answer? :blink: Or not enough? :huh:

    I use Vallejo Model Colors almost exclusively, that's why I asked. They're supposed to be one of, if not the best paints on the market. One drop of water and the color starts to seperate.

     

    Very annoying.

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