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flameberge

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About flameberge

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  1. Outstanding! My favorite Dark Sword miniature and you did it more than justice.
  2. I never painted red hair before so it involved going back and forth with various colors and washes till I got something I liked. I started with a mix of VMC red leather and P3 Bloodtracker brown. Then I put on a P3 flesh wash. Then I used various mixes of P3 Khador Highlight and P3 Ember orange to highlight and some more flesh washes, more highlighting here and there, and so on until it looked right. I don't know if that helps much.
  3. The pic seems to drown out the highlights, especially the green, but here it is.
  4. Foundry Miniature's Painting and Modelling Guide by Kevin Dallimore
  5. They look very nice. I have a tip you might want to try sometime, especially with artillery with barrels this large, I would take a Dremel tool and drill out the barrel a little ways.
  6. The paint job is fantastic and that amazing scenic base work combines to make this a spectacular figure!
  7. Historical gamers have been using Minwax forever. You get a whole heck of a lot more for a whole lot less money than the quickshade and I find no difference between the two products. Minwax will give you an EXTREMELY tough coating. As for what color to use English Tudor Stain is the Minwax shade you want but for some reason this particular shade can only be found at Ace hardware.
  8. I actually use white glue. I put a piece of masking tape on the bottom of the slot of the base then nearly completely fill the entire slot with white glue. I then smear more white glue over the top of the base. I then insert the mini in the slot. If you put too much glue in the slot some will ooze out so you just carefully smear it around the base without getting it on the mini. Finally I dip the thing in sand and let dry for a few hours. Then peel off the masking tape off the bottom so you can let the glue at the bottom of the slot dry. You now have your figure both glued and based with sand. It takes a while because of all the drying time but I like that the entire slot gets filled without having to mess with putty and you get the sand on the base at the same time.
  9. Thanks guys for taking the time to respond to help me out. A couple questions to make sure I'm understanding correctly. Inarah, when you say soften the texture highlights on the tunic do you mean I should make smaller transitions between shadow to base to highlight? Heisler, when you say the highlights need to come up do you mean they need to end up brighter or have more contrast between highlight to shadow? Thanks again.
  10. There are some amazing painters out there, ones that I have looked at their work with envy and said to myself, "Wow, I wish I was that good." And guess what, you stomped them into the ground with this work. Your work is so amazing and so stunning I simply don't have the words to adequately describe just how good this piece is.
  11. Your off to a good start. I have a couple suggestions to make your life easier. I would glue your figures to a temporary base like a water bottle cap or something similar using Elmers glue so when your painting your figure so you have less of a problem with the paint wearing off while you paint it. Then when your done with the figure you can just pop it off. Secondly, while it might make painting a little more difficult, I would glue the figure together before priming and painting. Gluing metal to metal forms a stronger bond plus if you put super glue on a painted figure when you try and glue the hand on you'll find that the superglue discolors the paint near the joint. I also have a trick to use for eyes that helps prevent the cross eyed look. Try painting your figures to be looking at an angle rather than straight on. This really helped me out in the beginning.
  12. Your figure is looking good so far. I'm eager to see the final product. I can't stress enough the importance of priming figures and then sealing them if your going to use these on the tabletop. It requires little work, and there is nothing more heart wrenching than watching a spectacular paint job get ruined because the fig wasn't primed or sealed. I also use Kang's gloss then matte seal tech niche. I find that Testor's Dullcote does a fantastic job of making the highlights pop rather than subduing them. Just thought I'd throw in my 2 cents.
  13. I didn't know Pine Sol would strip paint. Probably a lot less smelly than my method of dropping the figs in some gasoline.
  14. I'm trying to become a better painter and so I am looking for some constructive criticism on my latest work. Your help would be appreciated. Thanks
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