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Pingo

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Everything posted by Pingo

  1. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    General George Armstrong Custer was one of many men (and women) of that time who was basically LARPing a historical romantic fantasy all the time. The mid-nineteenth century was a time of huge nostalgia and romanticism for The Good Old Days of chivalry and whatnot. Empress Eugenie of France, who set the fashion, loved the styles of the mid-seventeenth century, and loved to dress up in the mid-nineteenth century image of them. That is what all those gigantic satin dresses and lace collars and corkscrew curls were about. Men who loved the fashion tramped about in big Musketeer hats and long hair and extravagant moustaches and big Musketeer boots ... ... You know, like Custer did.
  2. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    So you’re probably familiar with Percy Bysshe Shelley’s 1818 sonnet “Ozymandias,” inspired by a colossal fragment of a statue of Rameses II of Egypt: I met a traveller from an antique land, Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand, Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed; And on the pedestal, these words appear: My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair! Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away.” What you may not know is that Shelley and a friend, Horace Smith, a slightly older poet, had a friendly competition going and they each wrote a sonnet on the subject. Here’s Smith’s take on Ozymandias, also published in 1818: In Egypt's sandy silence, all alone, Stands a gigantic Leg, which far off throws The only shadow that the Desert knows:— "I am great OZYMANDIAS," saith the stone, "The King of Kings; this mighty City shows "The wonders of my hand."— The City's gone,— Naught but the Leg remaining to disclose The site of this forgotten Babylon. We wonder,—and some Hunter may express Wonder like ours, when thro' the wilderness Where London stood, holding the Wolf in chace, He meets some fragment huge, and stops to guess What powerful but unrecorded race Once dwelt in that annihilated place. Not ... terrible, but you can see why Shelley’s Ozymandias is remembered and Smith’s is not.
  3. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    Do ... do you not get a constant stream of spam robocalls?
  4. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    Discord seems to be a pretty go-to place for games with scattered participants. I’m in a game on Slack, but it is notably lacking in the timely and clear notifications department.
  5. Pingo

    Unpainted Minis from Wizkids

    That's something that's been bugging me for a while. I don't mind computer renders of digitally sculpted figures as a sort of proof of concept. But coloring those renders and presenting them as if they were painted examples is dishonest.
  6. Pingo

    Happy Birthday Strawhat!

    Happy birthday!
  7. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    The caves where the art is were not shelters. A few shelter spaces have been found and they are very different. For the most part the decorated caves are isolated, tricky to get into (a number require scaffolding or ladders) and deep, requiring a constant source of artificial lighting. Some show signs of people sticking around for a few days, but none seem to be places of regular habitation. And the cave paintings are not mere wall decoration. They betray a deep understanding of animal anatomy, movement and behavior, as well as a sophisticated use of tricky art materials, some of which did not exist in the area and had to have been traded for from hundreds of kilometers away. This is not wallpaper or graffiti or doodling, by any stretch of the imagination.
  8. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    It’s possible. Most of the caves started deteriorating once large numbers of people started tramping through, breathing out carbon dioxide and carrying in bacteria. I don’t know for certain, but I would not be surprised. However ... The pigments used were absolutely permanent. They would not fade. And in good light much of what the Abbé Breuil seemed to see as a face look at best like accidents of pigment left in uneven spots on the rock face. And why would this one unique figure be face-on, when pretty much every other image in all the caves everywhere is in silhouette? And with such oddly precise details and such an unusual style, unheard-of anywhere else? There are only a tiny number of identifiably male human figures in Paleolithic cave art, which is perhaps why scholarship has focused so intensely on them. The depictions of men tend to be described as distant, cartoonish, small and almost mocking. There are a considerably greater number of depictions of women and their reproductive organs in the caves, and they tend to be depicted on a scale of observational, intimate and familiar realism commensurate with the animals. Which reminds me. You know all those cave handprint silhouettes? Turns out nearly all of them are women’s hands, apart from the ones that are children’s. Go figure.
  9. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    While I'm on cave art, SO ... You know that super-famous image of a "sorcerer" from the Trois Frères cave in France, a nude man with dangly boy bits and a spooky wide-eyed owl mask head staring right at you with antlers up top? The eerie, spooky one that's used as proof and evidence for all kinds of early-man-and-magic theories? You've probably seen it. Pen and ink drawings of it can be found pretty much everywhere cave art is discussed. (NSFW because boy bits) https://enlightenment.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/thesorcerer.jpg Wait ... Pen and ink drawings? Why not the original? All of this art has been thoroughly photographed by now. Well, possibly it's because the actual unretouched original looks like this: https://www.donsmaps.com/images36/p64two600dpiscan_503sorcerer.jpg No owl mask. No head at all, almost. No fingers. No toes. NONE of those fancy, juicy, magical shaman sorcerer bits. There may not be any identifiable boy parts. It's not even clear if there is a tail. The back end looks like some smudges which could easily have been from an earlier unrelated artwork. There might be an antler, but it is engraved, scratched into the rock, whereas the rest of ... whatever ... is there is painted. The smears, smudges, and scratches could easily be just another of the thousands upon thousands of overlapping but unconnected cave images. It's just ... a smeary, probably human bottom half of a body near some scratches in the wall. The whole thing is a fiction of wishful thinking. NOTHING of the famous image is actually there.
  10. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    Not strictly empty. You’d be floating in the icy waters over the frigid drowned alpine forests of a lost continent. If that’s any consolation.
  11. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    There’s a roleplaying game of this! It’s put out by Evil Hat Productions and it got great reviews. No commerce links, but (peeks) hey! It’s on sale!
  12. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    By the 1980s we knew the Earth was somewhere in the region of 4.55 billion years old and I think we knew humanity's rough age too, so Carl Sagan, whatever he was talking about, meant it. Two minutes on this scale equals (if I've calculated correctly) about 17,300 years, which is roughly the age of the Cave of Lascaux paintings and might be construed as the advent of modern human society.
  13. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    Also I've found the spot just off Highway 501 southeast of Lethbridge, Alberta which lands you on the Desolation Islands. Or rather, I cheated and went to the Desolation Islands and found myself just off Highway 501 southeast of Lethbridge, Alberta. The Desolation Islands are spooky. They are the last reaches of the highest highlands of an actual continent (piece of continental crust) that got drowned when the Ice Age ended and the sea level rose.
  14. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    That's not quite accurate. The Earth is 4.543 billion years old and modern humans evolved about 200,000 years ago. That means modern humans would appear on December 31st just after 11:37 PM, by my calculations. Single-celled life would pop up on March 26th, and multicellular life would not show up until November 14th, if I've calculated properly.
  15. Pingo

    Happy Birthday Ludo!

    May you have a happy birthday!
  16. Pingo

    Happy Birthday Corporea!

    Happy birthday to you!
  17. Pingo

    Metal Trade In Approved Company List

    Check if you have a local Household Hazardous Waste Recycling facility that will take lead-contaminated children’s toys. For further info: https://archive.epa.gov/epawaste/hazard/web/html/faq-2.html
  18. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    When I make meatloaf I mix all the ingredients except the meat first, so I can test the balance of flavors. Regardless, I always fry a tiny bit of meatloaf mix to test the flavor of the meatloaf before forming it and baking it. That way I can adjust if it needs salt, etc.
  19. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    I never much liked hot dogs as a kid. Probably from being fed a lot of very cheap, nasty ones.The “Armour Hot Dogs” song left me feeling lonely and outcast because apparently all normal kids loved them, whereas I was all, blech. When I met Pingos(not yet)Husband he introduced me to kosher hot dogs, specifically Best’s Kosher Beef Franks, the best hot dogs ever made. It was a revelation, and until Sara Lee discontinued Best’s in 2009 I found that yes, I could like hot dogs.
  20. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    So you know all those cool Paleolithic cave art paintings of horses and bulls and stuff? Most of them are pretty close to life size. They’re HUGE. Imagine coming across something like a lifesize woolly rhino in a nearly dark cave.
  21. To do list: More reference books! make: Map of Europe at Last Glacial Maximum, with biome notes Map of Dordogne Valley, with sites listed Map of cave at Lascaux, with side elevations if possible Photograph collection of ochre pigments Find unretouched photos of Magdalenian artworks (trickier than it sounds - many of them, especially the engravings, are “augmented”) Also, did you know that most of the cave paintings are gigantic? Like, life sized, some of them. Wayyyyyy bigger than you’d expect. https://www.dezeen.com/2016/12/16/snohetta-architects-unveil-visitor-centre-most-famous-lascaux-cave-paintings-france/
  22. Well, I've gone and done it. I got a YouTube channel and have started making a series of videos on matters of paint and painting. Okay, I say "series of videos" all grandly, but at the moment it's one video and a planned syllabus. But I have more planned! This is pretty much my first video ever. I was helped a great deal by my family members who have more experience in this. The first video is a paint comparison, looking at one of the new Liquitex Acrylic Gouache paints (Quinacridone Magenta, PR122) and considering its suitability for miniatures painting. Enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwonRqv0Xgk
  23. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    One of our gamer buddies is like that. It's why we started substituting chocolate liqueur when chocolate baking recipes called for coffee.
  24. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    ... Oooh! There’s a monarch butterfly on the milkweed RIGHT NOW!
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