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Pingo

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Everything posted by Pingo

  1. Pingo

    Little Fuzzy Book Series

    Darrell K. Sweet was a terrible artist but a lovely person. And his horses really were amazingly good. (I can’t think of a D&D illustrator of the 1980s or 1990s who did horses really well. Good horses are tricky.)
  2. Pingo

    Little Fuzzy Book Series

    I realize I was rude to Darrell K. Sweet. He wasn’t just fast. He was also, by reports, one of the sweetest guys you’d ever meet.. And nobody did horses as well as he did. Nobody.
  3. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    Wha just happened? I was in the middle of a conversation about Michael Whelan’s art and suddenly my post is on a page with people yelling at each other last weekend about Nazis and someone waving a modbat.
  4. Pingo

    Little Fuzzy Book Series

    I think Michael Whelan may have been the best overall artist doing book covers in the US industry at the time. Rowena painted better figures, Darrell K. Sweet was lightning fast, Don Maitz had a more cinematic sense of lighting and space. They were and are all very good at what they do. But Whelan’s best work held together as composition and art that wouldn’t be out of place in a museum.
  5. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    DOOOO EEEETTT!
  6. Pingo

    Little Fuzzy Book Series

    The common industry practice (in the old days - I have no idea about now) was for the publisher to tell the artists what they wanted and that they wanted it last week, cheap. It was the lucky artist who got a sneak peek at the manuscript. The Good Show Sir website remains one of the finest online collections of truly awful sff cover art: http://www.goodshowsir.co.uk/
  7. Pingo

    Little Fuzzy Book Series

    You and about a hundred thousand literary Sf fans in 1983 - the ones who didn’t subscribe to the notion that they were originally supposed to be Wookies, that is.
  8. Pingo

    Little Fuzzy Book Series

    Michael Whelan, back when he still did genre illustration*, was renowned for reading the manuscript he was going to illustrate and illustrating it as accurately as possible. I don’t know how he got away with it. From what I hear most publishers did not bother giving the cover artists anything of the writing they were to illustrate. But for whatever reason, Michael Whelan made certain he got his hands on the actual fiction he was supposed to be representing. It helps that he is an excellent draughtsman and colorist with a good sense of composition. His earlier work might be a little clunky here and there, but he improved quickly to a very high standard. *He made enough off it to be able to retire and focus on his chief love, deeply symbolic realist paintings.
  9. Pingo

    Little Fuzzy Book Series

    It's definitely Whelan. That's one of his various signature logos at the bottom right. Looks a little like a gothic "M" colliding with a gothic "W."
  10. Pingo

    Little Fuzzy Book Series

    I think they're all Whelan covers. I need to go do stuff now but I could research this later.
  11. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    It’s already left the territory of what I think of as lean (usually work-related) muscle development and entered the bulbous universe of body-building, not helped by the fact that the picture has been heavily doctored (see below). It is heavily airbrushed/ photoshopped, and thus useless for my purposes. You can tell by the utter lack of variation in skin tone (with that little fat at least a few bluish veins should be showing) and the utter lack of definition within the muscles despite some pretty harsh lighting (Muscles that heavily developed have a fibrous structure. In reality you never get that combination of highly-defined muscle groups and body fat-smoothed contours.) For visual references I tend to prefer journalistic photographs to airbrushed anatomical model shots. One sharp-focused action shot of several soccer or basketball players is more useful to me than any number of doctored glamour shoots. I should have thought of that last night, but I blanked on search terms. In the end I hauled off to the studio and pulled out one of my anatomy reference books, that and imagination being more useful to me than the dudes flexing on the web. It’s fine. It’s male-presenting.
  12. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    The other Portland was named Portland because of a coin toss. It could have been named Boston.
  13. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    In looking for reference images of a lean muscled arm I discovered I cannot Google “lean muscled arm” because all that gets me is cartoonishly bulbous bodybuilders’ arms. Uh oh. Blackout.
  14. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    My condolences.
  15. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    Too soon. I’m so sorry.
  16. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    Looks like milkweed bugs CAN fly, they just don’t LIKE to. Can’t say I’m surprised. They seem heavy for their size and a little awkward, making them appear WAY more alarming and buzzy when in flight. And they seem to want to aim for the comfort and security of human clothes. Also they don’t seem to like accidentally hitching a ride with the pizza delivery person into a chilly house. Did I mention they’re weirdly buzzy? Anyhow, the red hitchhiker is happily back on milkweed outside. Crisis averted. Outside I saw TWO monarchs doing the dance of Life is Great by our milkweed patch, so I do have hopes we may get caterpillars.
  17. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    Prairie garden. Dreams of monarchs. Gets milkweed bugs.
  18. Pingo

    Getting to Know You July 2019

    But of course. We've used them in Dungeons and Dragons, Pathfinder, Runequest, Champions, Shadowrun, Exalted, various World of Darkness games, any number of homebrews, and some tabletop wargames.
  19. Pingo

    Getting to Know You July 2019

    I don't do flea markets, but at a charity booksale I found one (of the original three) D&D pamphlet for 50 cents and the 1st ed. Monster Manual for a dollar. Also for a dollar I got a very cool Depression-era General Foods cookbook with a gorgeously illustrated and so fragile it could not have possibly survived otherwise 1909 Karo Syrup recipe booklet tucked into it. Picture of the Karo Syrup pamphlet cover here: https://twitter.com/AchronalA/status/1150195945105240064
  20. So, my eldest, who had such fun making the funny and erudite "Shakespeare Summarized" videos in high school, is now in college, and while time is short, has still managed to tackle the Greek classics that she is studying. I am obviously biased, but I think they are fun and educational. , is the longest, at 11 minutes, and is completely hand-drawn owing to there being no suitable available movie footage. *** The "Shakespeare Summarized" series remains on Youtube to educate and amuse.
  21. Huh. This is a thing. So as usual her new video went up at ten AM local time yesterday. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LXOyw-csJoE At lunch she looked at her phone and said, That’s weird. Viewer numbers seem kind of high. (They were about 4X average.) Today her video made YouTube’s official “trending” list (Number 23, it looked like, when I checked). That seems pretty cool to me.
  22. Pingo

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    Hey, @Guindyloo, are you okay? I know you’re in the New Orleans area.
  23. Pingo

    Don't ask me anything. Tell me something.

    Pretty much the only thing keeping the Mississippi River flowing by New Orleans (and not jumping its much-risen banks to flow down the Atchafalaya instead, leaving downriver cities in a fresh-waterless salt marsh and crippling global shipping of US wheat) is the Old River Control Structure system of floodgates 200 miles upstream from the city. I would be mildly amused that the place is called ORCS, except that the whole system is seriously precarious, a kludge on top of a kludge on top of a kludge, and unless policies change there is probably going to be a catastrophic Mississippi River channel shift during our lifetimes. Right now the lower MIssissippi is super high because of all the wet spring weather in the central US. Tropical Storm Barry, although not terribly big by tropical storm standards, is getting set to dump up to twenty inches of rain this weekend on New Orleans. Because of the high river water it could have an outsized effect. If you have the time there is a really good, but very long article about the general situation from a 1987 “New Yorker.” https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1987/02/23/atchafalaya If you don’t, there’s a much shorter, current-day version in three parts starting here: https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/Americas-Achilles-Heel-Mississippi-Rivers-Old-River-Control-Structure
  24. Pingo

    Happy Birthday Wren!

    A happy birthday to you!
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