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Corporea

Bones Supporter
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Corporea last won the day on September 24 2016

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About Corporea

  • Rank
    Godlike
  • Birthday July 1

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    North Carolina, USA
  • Interests
    Painting, Sculpting, fancy basing, gaming, giving positive feedback to everyone and dispensing as many likes as possible!

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  1. Corporea

    Forumite Classes, 2019

    I found your don't fear the dragon class on the schedule. was there another? I can keep looking! If you login to growtix account, it will show you if yours have been approved. Interestingly enough, it shows the ones from last year as "completed"
  2. Corporea

    Forumite Classes, 2019

    I need to add one more class, but haven't decided what to teach. I've taught black and white, red and yellow, and I was thinking it might be fun to do a more advanced color theory class with more time for mixing and blending funky colors like complementaries together. If there is anything you guys want, let me know. I can probably get a handout together. Skin Deep- 2 hours, Thursday and Saturday Type: Painting Level: Intermediate Format: Hands-on Synopsis: This is an intermediate level skin class, focused mainly on blending and glazing to achieve smooth skin tones. Students should be familiar with glazing and/or layering in order to get the most out of this class. While the majority of the class will be spent on the face, I will cover placement of highlights and shadows on other skin surfaces and the differences between painting male and female figures. Please bring a brush with a nice tip. I find it easier to blend skin with a size 1 or 2 brush, as smaller brushes tend to dry out more quickly. Students will receive a handout on material covered in the class and all other materials will be provided. The Skincare Routine- 2 hours, Thursday Type: Painting Level: Beginner Format: Hands-on Synopsis: How to make the pimples vanish and the true you shine through? Er, not exactly, but... this is a beginner level class on how to approach skin tones. We’ll cover color choices, basic highlights and shadowing, washes, facial features and hopefully a simple way to tackle eyes. Please bring a brush with a nice tip. A handout and all other materials will be provided. If you don’t have a nice brush, I should have several loaners available, so never fear! Color Theory 101- 2 hours, Friday Type: Painting Level: Beginner (really any level, color theory is the bestest) Format: Lecture then painting Synopsis: Ever wonder why some colors don’t play well with others? Or what all those fancy terms painters sling around really mean? Never fear! This is a beginner level class on my favorite subject: How to make friends with and influence colors! We’ll cover terms, examples, paint qualities, mixing and troubleshooting in lecture format for the first hour. We’ll create our very own color wheels and practice applying the principles we’ve learned for the remainder of the time. Please bring a brush you use for rough work such as basework or priming- something old and well-loved, as we might be abusing it just a bit. A handout and everything else needed for class will be provided. Please note, some of the paints we will be working with are TOXIC, so no brushlicking allowed.
  3. Corporea

    how to desaturate colors (red)

    Doug's right. So saturation is a function of how we see the color in terms of wavelength, pigment density, pigment choices and paint additives. What red are you using? If you have a picture of it, we might be able to help you choose how to beat it into submission. here's the wikipedia page I generally use. here's a graphic of how colors change when you add things: See how adding white lightens but also desaturates the color? The pigment is less intense. Same with the black. The [ ] thingys show the area generally of highest chroma- most intense color, or the color the artist started with. Notice how they are at different heights relative to one another on the columns? This is a function of the pigment. certain color max their chroma out along different parts of the value scale (that's the first column, black to white) That's going to affect how they play with each other and which one wins the right to rule. Classically, adding the complement of a color will desaturate it. See how it grays out in the center the closer you get to a perfect mix of the two? Some colors are stronger than others. Have you ever tried mixing and noticed how if you use one, you have to add a ton of another to make it shift at all? This has to do with the quality of the paint sometimes, and the pigments used- be they dense, weak or simply stronger. Playing on paper with paint mixes can be helpful, and will show you how to alter a color bit by bit until you get the result you want. What colors do you have available? If you have the ability to get something like a cadmium red, ultramarine blue and medium cadmium yellow, those purer colors plus white and black, will allow you to mix just about anything you want.
  4. Corporea

    Randomness XV: 'tis a silly place.

    I have officially figured out gold NMM!!!! I just have to share because it's been tormenting me for years and every time I try to tackle it I fail. But I did it! Whooo! NMM is MINE! Mine, I tell you! Ahem. I learned a thing. Learning is awesome. Carry on. (should probably add colors: ebony flesh, oiled leather, worn olive, lemon yellow, linen white. Yeah- green. Green?! Madness.)
  5. Corporea

    Night Setting

    You have to have some sort of light source and still highlight the mini, you just choose how much highlighting you want. I've recently been experimenting with light sources. Here are a few examples: In this one, the darkness still has highlighting, but is done more monochrome Here the light source is very bright and provides some color information, but otherwise the highlighting is done in sepia. Notice that even though the backside is dark, there is still highlighting. You can see the details and volumes. Same here, only with two different colors of light. The front is lit by a warm light, the back more by moonlight or whatever they use in Hollywood to represent moonlight. Contrasting color is one way to achieve the effect of darkness. Using color in only a "lit" area is another. The risk with trying to paint "darkness" is that you lose information about the scene. This is an example from Bailey03 on CMON. I always liked the way it feels dark, but if you look at it with color removed: ...you can see how some areas on the "night" are still very light. I guess the trick is to use enough highlighting we can see the forms, but not so much that it feels too light. This is probably easiest done using color contrast. Use cool colors as they tend to recede and make us feel cold or make us think of night. Teals, blues, desaturated purples are good for this.
  6. Corporea

    77103: Nor'Okk, Ettin

    close eyes... paint... hmmn.... Glad to see you back at it, Andy!!!
  7. Corporea

    Mouse's First Bust (Advice and Comments Appreciated)

    There are several ways to approach blending and usually one stands out as more intuitive. 1. start with the two colors you want to blend and separate them far apart on your palette. Then in between, mix yourself gradations of shades. Mix as many shades as you want. The more you mix, the easier the steps can be. Once you have the gradations, start by laying down your middle one. The gradually add the others highlighting up or shading down. Each of the layers should slightly overlap and the farther you go from the center, they should take up a smaller amount of space. In order to make an area appear to be one color, it must take up at least 50% if not more of the "real estate." This process is called layering, and it's a good start to blending. It can be a very smooth blend, especially if the colors are similar and the more "layers" you use. This can be done with a wet palette like above, or in a welled palette, where you are mixing thinned paint. Wren often uses a welled palette when doing her smooth blends. I've seen her mix 12-15 shades, all designed to hide the transitions from us. 2. Another way of blending is wet blending. This usually requires some humidity to work well, though if you move quickly it isn't necessary. I lay down one color, then what I usually do is not even clean my brush but grab the next color and slap it down close. Then I sort of feather between the two to muddle them together. Feathering is a perpendicular stroke to the areas of color. To blend the red and tan, I'd run my strokes of paint following the arrow. If using the lighter color, I move my stroke towards the jaw. If using the red, I move opposite the arrow. Shade down and highlight up if that makes sense. Doing a perpendicular stroke fools our eyes and we are less likely to notice the blending. 3. Glazing. I think this approach has been stressing for you, so when you come to reaper, sit down with me at my table (or I can come to yours, or ask Rhonda "Wren" Bender as she has about the smoothest blends of anyone) and we'll practice glazing and finding the right consistency and brush for you. Some do well with smaller or larger brushes. It varies, until we figure out how much paint and water to keep in our brush at any given time. The way this usually works is laying down the midtone. Then thinning the paint of your shade or highlight color, and gradually working them up or down in the shadows in very thin layers. Let each one dry before you put more paint down. A way to fight the urge to put another down is to work on either multiple minis or different areas of the mini while one dries. When I glaze, I put down the shading color, then clean my brush quickly and pull the color outwards towards my midtone using the residual water on the brush. What this means is most of my paint is left behind, but I blur it outwards so we are less likely to notice the blending. This is a blown up blend on skin. You can still see the lines between the blends, but only if you look close up. That is the illusion we try to create with glazing. It is designed to make such tiny divisions between gradations of color that we don't notice the transition. It is by far the fussiest of the techniques and has an irritating learning curve. I think it is why people get frustrated when they blend non metallic metal, because the blend looks wrong up until the end. We keep seeing the transitions until we've managed to smooth them away and this takes layers and layers and layers. A good way to learn glazing is to play with watercolor techniques. What you want to learn to do is something called a graded wash- if you google it, there are a lot of videos and pictures on it. What you do is get a semi wet brush and have some cheap watercolor paper or thick drawing paper available. Pick up a bit of your color and start by laying down a back and forth stroke and gradually working down the paper. You can re-wet the brush when it dries and keep going. This will gradually make the paint layer more transparent as there is less and less of the pigment available. This is similar to the glaze technique in that it tends to be how we blend the edges of our glazes in to other colors. On paper, we're using the white background to show change, On the mini, we're just putting it on top of another color. Does that make sense? I use all of these methods. I often slap paint down and wet blend to start with and mix as I go. I was joking with Wren this weekend that I call it going "Banshee" on the mini, in that I only worry about where I want colors and not the blends at all. (Banshee the painter is known for not caring about smooth blends) Then I go back with some layers to smooth up any stark transitions. Last I glaze the heck out of it to finish the blending process. So one isn't better than the other, just different.
  8. Corporea

    Notre Dame Cathedral is Burning T_T

    Glad no one was hurt, but... the art, organ and windows... the history. I am so sorry for the French people right now. I wish I had the right words for how sorry.
  9. no- as soon as the missing models have been restocked they'll go back to the pledges that were missed.
  10. Yup, looked at both. I locked in late 5/2018, so I'm not surprised. They'll get here eventually!
  11. appears they are on wave 2. which means they ran out of the hut as I am wave 1 and ordered it. Hey, any updates on the refill shipment?
  12. Hey- does anyone use any any spray sealers for bones? My friend wants to seal her Cthulhu but I've never used a spray one before other than dullcoat. she has a krylon kamar varnish and a valspar clear satin enamel. Is there another dedicated spray sealer out there? thanks guys!!
  13. Corporea

    Guinea Pigmies

    It's the nose. That nose is dynamite. Adorable! What a fun idea!
  14. Corporea

    Hair repair

    a cheap fix is to pick up some Golden Molding Paste. It's almost exactly the same as liquid green stuff, but way cheaper in bulk. As long as you keep the jar closed, it lasts a long time. I've had my 8 oz jar for 2 years now, and still kicking. You can get it from most hobby stores and online. You can texture the surface. It acts a lot like water effect and dries translucent to clear. Once you fill in the gaps, you can paint over it like any miniature surface. Just let it dry for a day. You can also use it to smooth surfaces and mold lines, build it up like water effect and fill in gaps. It's quite versatile. You can even mix paint in it, though I've noticed it tends to make the color a bit weaker. I've used it for blood effects as well. I can't link commerce, but I bought mine at Michael's and Amazon has it. The gaps are fixable, though I'm so sorry this happened!
  15. Corporea

    Mouse's First Bust (Advice and Comments Appreciated)

    She's looking great! Great work on the skin! You're making a lot of progress with glazing! I meant to post this earlier- and was going to just PM you with them, but the little mini message in PM isn't letting me do attachments the way I want, so... spoliers: I thought that might help when you get to the hair. I know the colors are not the same for the skin, sorry! I couldn't find an already painted image of this on the reaper site, so hope it helps! I'd forgotten about mine and it's been languishing on my desk. Glad you're working on yours! You're doing awesome!!!
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