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Wren

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Wren last won the day on December 2 2019

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About Wren

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    Knoxville, TN (formerly Toronto, Canada)

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  1. Thanks for the feedback so far everyone! Just to keep things on target - I'm an instructor asking on behalf of instructors submitting classes, and classes only. We want to offer what you want to take! We just can't always figure out what that is. 😆 That's definitely the case for me with the 'advanced' thing, and I guess I'm not the only instructor if we're not offering enough of it. It's the kind of thing people will have different definitions of, I'm already seeing that in the answers so far. I started this thread after reading through the class comment thread for last ReaperCon. I saw more than one comment there about a paucity of advanced classes, and I've seen similar comments in past years, so I figured it was a topic worth delving into. I can and have suggested panels to Reaper, but I can't make it happen. I definitely have no influence on how the streaming is conducted. I mention because I don't have any reason to believe that any of the Reaper people who are in charge of scheduling and streaming and whatnot will read this thread, so those topics are probably better raised as new threads or addressed to Reaper peeps directly rather than being discussed in much detail in this thread.
  2. I have a question for class takers, especially those who’ve been painting and taking classes for a while. I regularly see comments wishing for more advanced/technical classes. My question to the people looking for those is: What are some examples of what you consider to be more advanced class topics? What makes something more technical? What exactly are the classes you want to take that you aren’t seeing offered? (Or not enough of offered.) I’ve been thinking about this for years, and I never really come up with any concrete ideas for what could be done that would accomplish anything meaningful in the 90-120 minutes of a class, particularly a hands-on one. So I thought I would go to the source and ask the people looking for the classes! I have a few followup questions and comments, but I figure best to just start here.
  3. In all the years of Reaper LTPK kits (mine is the third generation, I started painting with the first generation!), Reaper has never made the instructions available separately. I do not know if they have any plans to reconsider that choice at this time. I certainly understand your predicament though! However, now that I have a streaming show on the Reaper Twitch channel, you can get some of the information in a different format. I painted through the mini kit I did for Krampus on the show a few weeks ago. If you go to this YouTube playlist, look for shows #27 and #28. I figure I'll do something similar with the goblins once I get my hands on the kit! (I used up all my goblins doing colour tests and stuff for it.)
  4. The figures are the same as those provided in the Kickstarter, Bones Black. The information about taking care of materials and the technique explanation is largely the same as in the Core Skills kit. The materials info is updated to distinguish between the different kinds of Bones plastic, and I'm hopeful that this updated information will be included in future print runs of the regular kits. The main technique demo/practice figure allowed me to introduce a little colour variation detailing in the final step that is not in either of the two regularly available kits. There is a LOT more colour mixing in the B5 kit. With Core Skills and Layer Up, I chose paints specifically to work on the three miniatures I selected for the kits with an aim to keep things simple for mixing and such. Together the two kits do make a sort of mega starting set of paint colours and brushes, but my aim when making choices for those kits was the instructions first - what would be easiest to explain and execute as projects. The B5 kit has a lot more figures in it, so the paints were chosen more as a selection of a solid starting set of colours. You can't mix every colour ever with the included paints, but you can mix quite a few. So if you paint through the instructions for the included figures you'll be told ways to make khaki or natural greens even if all you have is bright yellow, green, and black, and a variety of other colours and colour schemes. There's not a lot of explicit information about colour, but if you're a learn by doing person you'll learn more about mixing and using colour working through the projects in this kit than in the others, since that was not a focus for me with those kits. I think the method I used for doing the finer details like belt buckles and necklaces and stuff is a little different in this kit.
  5. Art store folks tend to think of acrylic paints as minimum toothpaste consistency or thicker, so that influences the suggestions they'll make to customers. Watercolour brushes are often best for our more fluid miniature paints. They are less likely to leave texture behind when applying paint. Stiffer brushes for acrylics can be useful for stuff like drybrushing terrain. Acrylic paints are tough on brushes, so that gives art store folks another reason to steer anyone who says 'acrylic paint' towards brushes meant for thick acrylic tube paints. Ignore them, all the sables people are talking about are typically used in watercolour painting and are what work for us. Both types of painting benefit from brushes that hold a good load of paint but have fine tips you can use to paint with precision. Watercolour synthetics often work well for us too, but I've yet to find a synthetic brush that can hold the kind of point a good sable can.
  6. If paints have been sitting for a while the pigments may collect at the bottom while the lighter acrylic binder concentrates at the top of the bottle. It is good to periodically pop off the dropper tip and stir the paint. I use plastic cocktail swizzle sticks. I usually let the paint dry and reuse them for a while until they get too thickened up with paint. (Note that I have had a vortex mixer for years now, I still check and stir sometimes.) I have an article with info on the kinds of problems that can crop up with paint and how to do paint maintenance to maintain your paint in best condition.
  7. Currently this figure is available as a gift with purchase of $60 or more, I believe it will be available for separate purchase in January, but I do not know the SKU. If you're interested in more information on how I painted him, including the exact colours I used, I have written an article about it. Christine did such a great job with this, he's really fun to paint! I've also got an article with larger pics and back views of the nine of the 12 Days figures that I painted, as well as some information on painting some of them.
  8. You can get copper sheets as well I think if you'd rather have something flatter to put under your sponge.
  9. Fantastic information and explained so well!
  10. I've ordered from Dick Blick, Jerry's Artarama, and Cheap Joe's for years, and continue to buy from all three. I don't know for 100% sure if I've purchased brushes from all of them because I'm forgetful. I have ordered brushes from Jerry's. I know for sure that I've ordered brushes from Dick Blick because I once had that exact problem - they didn't package the brush well and it was smushed on delivery. I notified them and was sent another. The same thing happened, leading me to believe that the manufacturer of the brush didn't ship their product with those little plastic brush protectors. I notified them and was sent a third, and was fine. I also had a shipment where something was missing from my package and they made that right, as well. Winsor & Newton Series 7 are shipped from the company with both brush protectors, and inside a plastic tube, so they should be a reasonably safe order from anyone. (I do buy mine local when I can, I have a great local art store, but they don't always have the size I want and do not carry the Series 7 Miniature line and occasionally I need one of those.)
  11. The last of the re-released Bonesylvanians that I painted is Betty, and I painted her again this week. If you're curious about the difference that six years (and two hours) has made, check out the link below. The article also includes information on the colours I used for both versions. https://birdwithabrush.com/2021/10/22/then-and-now-ghost-bride-betty/
  12. Jake is looking for someone who enjoys Halloween movies as much as he does! Jake was originally released as a special edition figure for Halloween 2015. He was sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. Since Reaper Miniatures has re-released some of the unavailable Bonesylvanians for Halloween2021, I thought I would share some additional views of the ones I painted, as well as the colours I used. (Note that these figures are metal and sold individually. Not all of the Bonesylvanians originally released in 2014-2015 were made into Bones plastic versions.)
  13. If you’re feeling brave this Halloween, Maddie dares you to look her right in the eyes. Maddie was originally released as a special edition figure for Halloween 2015. She was sculpted by Julie Guthrie. Since Reaper Miniatures has re-released some of the unavailable Bonesylvanians for Halloween2021, I thought I would share some additional views of the ones I painted, as well as the colours I used. (Note that these figures are metal and sold individually. Not all of the Bonesylvanians originally released in 2014-2015 were made into Bones plastic versions.)
  14. Howie’s fish friend isn’t very much fun anymore, so now he wants to play with you! Howie was originally released as a special edition figure for Halloween 2015. She was sculpted by Julie Guthrie. Since Reaper Miniatures has re-released some of the unavailable Bonesylvanians for Halloween2021, I thought I would share some additional views of the ones I painted, as well as the colours I used. (Note that these figures are metal and sold individually. Not all of the Bonesylvanians originally released in 2014-2015 were made into Bones plastic versions.)
  15. Mary was originally released as a special edition figure for Halloween 2015. She was sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. Since Reaper Miniatures has re-released some of the unavailable Bonesylvanians for Halloween2021, I thought I would share some additional views of the ones I painted, as well as the colours I used. (Note that these figures are metal and sold individually. Not all of the Bonesylvanians originally released in 2014-2015 were made into Bones plastic versions.)
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