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Found 2 results

  1. The scrubby Western desert. Early morning. The weather is clear, and Meyer Herrick, impresario and director has a FULL schedule. Jimmy Ishikawa, cameraman and technician, makes sure the machinery is all running smoothly. Grips and stagehands haul on setpieces for the first shoot of the day--a period epic of Egyptian palace intrigue. Clapper and general assistant Eddie Green makes sure breakout star Clara Haroutian is prepared and familiar with her blocking. And here's the Old Man himself, shouting as usual! ' ROLL CAMERA! CUT! After several takes, Meyer is at least temporarily satisfied, and ready to shoot the next scene the studio needs, a bit of Greek tragedy. Once a darling of the limelight and the boards, Gordon Audifax is now a drunken has-been, taking a last shot at fame with the detested motion-pictures that stole his livelihood. Still a pro though! And with that segment finally wrapped and in the can (after much hollering and greasepaint touch-ups) the great director moves on from Illuminating Art to the stuff that keeps the lights on at the studio: stock Westerns. Rio Wilson and Miguel Alvarez trade squibs and quips that will later be written on title cards. CUT! You dash-blanking dod-durned dunderheads! Props knew we needed a castle wall backdrop for the swashbuckling scene, where the blue blinking blanked blazes is it?! Someone's gonna get fired so hard they won't never work in this town again! Ah well, we make do. The show must go on! Change the schedule, we'll take five and shoot the soliloquy today instead of tomorrow. Close-up shot, Jimmy! Aaand cut! That's going to be lunch. Check back in with Makeup after and we'll get through the rest of the dance number and the saloon scene! More pix if you need: This is an excellent pulp-era set; the old-timey camera is very detailed, and the spotlights can really swivel up and down. The director I wanted to look like a coarse, vulgar man with an unerring instinct for what audiences want to see, and I think the godawful check suit gets that across. Eddie and Jimmy have a lot of character in their postures and poses. Their presence immediately recontextualizes whatever scene is on display. CREDITS: Rio and Miguel and one of the stagehands are from Murch's Pulp Figures; the other stagehand is Artizan's Mr. Price. They and Clara (Egyptian Priestess, 03506, without baboon as Herrik refuses to work with monkeys) have been featured before, some of the first figures I posted here in fact. Gordon (Socrates, 50135) was painted so long ago I forget if I posted him separately or not. Edward Dumond (02775) and Hasslefree's Maika vom Ostwald are more recent and may well show up again! --fin!--
  2. I needed a bunch of female figures for an RPG set in the 1920s, and I needed them fast and cheap. Sunday I ordered some Heroclix for a buck each, and by Wed evening they were in my hands. I need to modify the figures to have longer dresses appropriate for the period when the game is set. First thing I did was cut them off at the feet. I found a hobby knife worked well. A sharp hobby knife would work better. I used two part epoxy putty to make skirts. I just smooshed it on and smoothed it out. I should have started with a blob between the legs and let it dry overnight for stability. Next: primer, paint and bases.
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