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Found 2752 results

  1. My first Black Bones mini, I got this lovely Owlbear from @Corsair !!! Thanks friend I hope did it proud! WIP here if interested: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/85553-bones-black-owlbear/ It took primer and paint very well. Glued with Greenstuffworld Superglue to it's base and flocked. Hope you like it!
  2. Waiting for my Bones 4 to show up... Barnabas is representing a sea dwarf ship captain played by one of my DND players. His trident was forged by Poseidon from the deepest coral; it is harder than adamantine armor.
  3. I put together a few documents related to using Bones. I've submitted these to the Craft section of the website, but as it may be a little while before Reaper has the time available to add them, Bryan suggested that I post them here. Bones - Frequently Asked Questions (this document) Bones - Preparation (mould line removal, glue, putty, etc.) Bones - The First Coat is the Difference (primer, primer alternatives, paint durability) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Bones Miniatures: Frequently Asked Questions What are Bones Miniatures? The Bones material is a polymer plastic. It is light-weight and slightly flexible, and is very durable. You can paint a Bones figure straight out of the package, and that paint job will also be pretty durable. Bones figures are as detailed as metal figures, for a much lower cost. Bones miniatures are produced with integral (built-in) bases, but it is easy to cut the miniature off of the base if you prefer to put it on something else. It is also easy to cut the figures apart to convert them into different poses or change weapons. What is the bare minimum I need to know to start painting my Bones right now! If you want background on why these are the recommendations or what other alternatives might also work, read the rest of this document, Painting Bones Miniatures: Preparation and Painting Bones Miniatures: The First Coat is the Difference. Remove Mould Lines Remove by slicing just under the mould lines with a hobby knife, in a similar motion to paring vegetable or hand-sharpening a pencil. Files work best if you file in one direction, then remove burrs by filing in the opposite direction. Reshape Bent Parts Dip the misshapen piece in boiling water for a minute or two, remove and move into desired position, then immediately hold in ice water for a few minutes. NOTE: Read additional information in this document for safety recommendations! What Glue to Use Superglue aka cyanoacrylate works best to glue Bones to itself or other materials. What Putty to Use All major brands of putty tested work with bones. (Green Stuff, Milliput, etc.) What Works as a Paint Stripper Soak figure in Simple Green Concentrated All Purpose Cleaner for 12 – 24 hours, then scrub it with an old toothbrush. Best Primer None. Start with a first coat of undiluted Reaper Master Series Paint, then paint as normal from there. This is the best choice for durability and a good painting surface. Other acrylic paints that work with miniatures should have similar results. Paint can be applied with a brush or airbrush (diluted paint seems to work with an airbrush.) Best Primer if You Want to Prime Anyway Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer in black or white, or Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium (also brush-on.) Best Spray Primer Many aerosol primers will not cure completely on Bones. Reaper forum members have reported good results with the Army Painter sprays. How to Do a Wash Directly on Bones Thin your wash with one of the following mediums and just a small amount of water if necessary: Master Series Brush-On Sealer, Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium, Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer. Can you really paint Bones miniatures straight out of the package? Absolutely! However, if you’ve ever painted metal, resin or plastic figures in the past, you may notice some differences in how the first coat of paint behaves. Paint diluted with water (even just a drop or two for a thinned base coat) may bead up and pull away from crevices. The more water you add to the paint, the more you’ll notice this effect, so water-thinned washes used directly on the Bones material don’t really work. That first coat of paint may also take a little longer to dry. Most people find that the paint applies a little better if you first wash the figure. Just scrub it with a little dish soap and a toothbrush and allow it to dry before you start to paint. Another alternative is to apply a primer or another surface preparation that works with the Bones material as the first coat. Once you get that first coat on, you can use highly thinned paint in subsequent layers and it should behave pretty much the same as on any other figure. For more information, methods to use thinned paint directly on the Bones surface, tips for quicker drying and a list of primers that do (or don’t) work with Bones, please see the Craft document Painting Bones Miniatures: The First Coat is the Difference. What kinds of paint work on Bones Miniatures? The Bones material is designed to work with Reaper’s Master Series and Master Series HD lines of paint. Internal testing and feedback from customers suggests that Bones also works well with the other major miniature paint lines, including Reaper’s discontinued Pro Paints, Vallejo Game Color, Vallejo Model Color, Privateer Press’ P3 Paints, and Games Workshop. Artists’ acrylic paint are also likely to work on Bones. However, please note that Reaper does not offer any guarantee or assurance that the Bones miniatures will work with any particular paint other than Master Series and Master Series HD. You are advised to test your preferred paint on a Bones figure to decide for yourself how well it works. If your paint does not work well on bare Bones, you can prepare the surface with a coat of Master Series paint and it will likely work over that. How do I remove the mould lines from a Bones figure? Like all miniatures, Bones figures have small mould lines as a result of the manufacturing process. You do not need to remove these to paint or use a Bones, but many people prefer to remove them for aesthetic reasons. You can remove these with the same tools you would use on a metal figure – hobby knife, files, and/or sandpaper. However, you may find that you need to use these materials in a slightly different way. Hobby knives work best if you slice under and along the mould line in a paring motion rather than scraping them along the mould line. With files and sandpaper, file in one direction perpendicular to the mould line. If you find you have burrs of material remaining, lightly file those off moving the tool in the opposite direction. How Durable is the Bones Material? Bones figures are remarkably durable, and not just in comparison to metal and resin figures. People have dropped Bones from a height of one storey, ground them underfoot, driven over them with a car, carried them loose in backpacks and pockets, and they’ve sustained no damage. The light weight of the material means drops and falls hit with much less mass behind them. The give of the material means it’s much better able to absorb impact, where a brittle material like resin will likely break. They’re not indestructible, but they can take an impressive amount of damage. We had several Bones figures out at the PAX Prime 2012 convention for people to examine and abuse. We bounced them off the floor, and invited dozens of people to step on them. One of the small kobolds with narrow diameter legs did break at one ankle on the third day. Another figure suffered a very small area of damage due to the friction generated by someone’s shoe grinding it across the floor. If Bones are so durable, is it hard to cut them up for conversions? What glue should I use? The Bones material cuts easily with a sharp hobby knife. Cuts have smooth edges and do not deform surrounding material as often happens with metal. So it is an easy matter to swap a head from one figure to another, or cut off an arm and reposition it slightly so you can customize individual figures within a unit. All it takes to glue them back together is regular superglue (cyanoacrylate). You can also use superglue to adhere Bones to metal or wood. Green Stuff and other two-part putties work well if you need to fill gaps or sculpt on additional details. Pinning is a good idea when attaching metal parts to a Bones miniature, as the added weight of the metal will otherwise make the join weaker. The plastic parts are quite stable when glued together, but pinning doesn’t hurt in plastic-to-plastic conversions, either. How durable is a painted Bones figure, though? Bones miniatures painted with Master Series and Master Series HD paint are surprisingly durable. You probably don’t want to grind one underfoot or drive over it with your car, but you’ll be amazed at what they can handle. Figures are unlikely to experience notable damage to the paint from regular handling, bumping against each other on the table, or getting knocked over, even when playing with the most ham-handed of players. My painted test figures survived being tossed unsecured in a plastic box with a bunch of unpainted Bones that was carried around two conventions (PAX Prime and Gen Con 2012). They were handled by hundreds of people and literally and repeatedly thrown onto tables from heights of several feet. They have some dings and chips, but the bulk of the paint jobs survived. The paint on these figures had not been coated with any sort of protective sealer. The durability of other brands of paint may vary. I have not done the same sort of extensive testing with other brands of paint. In my limited testing of how well other brands of paint apply to bare Bones, I did notice that Vallejo Model Color paints seemed to rub off the figure pretty easily. I did not notice that happening with the other brands I tested. (P3, Vallejo Game Color, Pro Paint, Adikolor.) Can you remove unwanted paint from a Bones figure? Sometimes painting a figure doesn’t go exactly as planned. If you would like to strip the paint from a Bones figure so you can start from scratch to paint it another way, just drop it into a dish of Simple Green Concentrated All Purpose Cleaner for 12 – 24 hours, then scrub it with an old toothbrush and it is ready to paint again. Some paint colours may leave a stain on the Bones material, but should not leave any texture or affect subsequent layers of paint. Simple Green in an eco-friendly cleaner sold in most hardware stores and some grocery stores. Brake fluid also works, though is a much more toxic material. Are Bones figures less detailed than their metal counterparts? Bones figures are bright white, which makes them hard to photograph. A number of people who have lacked confidence in the product quality based on the photographs in the online store have been pleasantly surprised by them once they can look at one in person. However, there are also a few people who feel the quality of the Bones is a little less than that of their metal counterparts. When available, Reaper’s online store includes photographs of painted versions of the figures that may give you a better idea, but looking at Bones yourself in person is really the only way to find out how you feel about them. I compared one of the smaller Bones, Dwarf Warrior 77011, against his counterpart, Fulumbar 14146, under magnification. The only real difference I noted between the two was that the texture of the chainmail loin cloth and the laces on the gloves were a tiny bit shallower on the Bones figure. You can see a comparison of a Bones and metal figure of the same sculpt painted identically in this thread on the Reaper forums: http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/47477-bathalian-bones-vs-metal-challenge/ Do Bones have sharp edges on weapons? Weapons and the like on Bones figures are cast at pretty much the same thickness as similar parts on Reaper’s metal figures. However, since Bones is a flexible plastic material, you will never be able to shave or file down an edge or a point to the same sharpness that you can achieve with a metal figure. Are the photographs of Bones figures in the online store and catalogue the same figures as the ones for sale? The online Reaper store and catalogue photographs of Bones miniatures are taken of production run figures – the same figures that Reaper packages up to sell. Can I do anything about a bent spear or sword on a Bones figure? You may find that sometimes the thinner parts on Bones, like spears and swords, will look a little bent. Or the figure might be leaning back or forward too much on its ankles. If you want to straighten those out, hold the figure with tongs or in a colander, and dip it into boiling or near boiling water for at least a minute or two. Remove it from the water, reposition the part, and immediately dunk it into a bowl of ice water for at least a minute. It should hold in the new position. If you expose the figure to heat at a later time, it may revert to its original position. For this reason, if you want to wash the figure with soap and water prior to painting, you should use cool water or wash it before you heat it to reset a warped part. Important safety notes: Please exercise caution! The Bones material may get hot when dipped in boiling water, so you should use protective gear rather than touching it with your bare fingers. The Bones material might be damaged or damage your pot if placed in direct contact with the pot surface. If you are under the age of 18, please ask your parents for permission and have them read this section before boiling Bones figures. Are Bones made in China or the United States? All Bones figures made prior to March 2013 were produced in China. In March 2013, Reaper installed the machine necessary to produce Bones in its factory in Texas, and began the process of transferring production in-house.
  4. for a 5E game. That's about all I can do for my WIP's theme after only one session. Mostly it will be monsters. Maybe I can convince the DM to tell me what's coming so I can paint it. These are just for tabletop, but my philosophy is you should still try something new on every piece, or at least work on getting better at something you can already do. Which is why I started a WIP I wasn't even originally going to bother with - for an experiment. I was looking at the marsh troll and thinking "this would be a good candidate for glaze painting." Now if you aren't familiar with glaze painting, it is where you prime white and then add washes/glazes of progressively darker colors. It creates your midtone and shadows, then you go back in and add back the highlights. You can do it for anything but it is ideal for textures. Now Bones are white, but you can't just go over them with diluted paints. Liner works well to prime, but then the mini is no longer white. But wait, I have a large bottle of white craft paint that I used for some terrain. What if I prime with liner, give it a heavy drybrush so the highlights are white again, and then glaze paint? Step 1: Brown liner + a heavy drybrush of white craft paint. Step 2: Green skin starts with yellow paint. Here is a potential issue - the liner shifts the shadows to green. As I want green skin this isn't an issue but it would be if I wanted my final color to be yellow. I am also trying not to be messy as I would need to make any messes white again later. Step 3: Sap green diluted to a wash. Now the skin is greenish. Step 4: A second wash of sap green in the shadows to add more depth. Step 5: His highlights are still pretty yellow in hand so I made a wash of anthraquinone blue. It will make the yellow more green and further darken the shadows. Oh, I hit his front too. It was really blue so I started the color shift with some phthalocyanine green ink. Interlude: Lem. Needed for a PC. Must be finished by Friday. The troll is optional. Step 6: All leather was hit with a couple of layers of burnt umber ink. Step 7: The wood was coated with a mix of burnt umber ink and titanium white. Some of the liner still shows through so the initial color is a little wonky in places. Maybe it'll add texture to the wood.... Step 7: Shade the wood. Initially I used a burnt umber ink wash, but it wasn't intense enough and would end up looking like the leather after a few more washes. So I used the obvious wood shadow color, dioxazine purple ink watered down to a wash. From the front. His belly got a wash of the burnt umber ink while it was out. A couple more and it would turn olive, but maybe I'll leave it bluish. While multiple washes have smoothed it out you can still see texture from the drybrush showing through. It's an interesting effect here but won't always be desirable. Step 8: Call it a night and go to bed. I have to work and make money after all. We can't paint all the time. Next update - unknown. I really do need to finish the halfling bard before I play around anymore.
  5. The bugbears that came in Bones 3 (the 4 identical ones) all had really floppy maces. Last night I decided to do something about that. One got a plastic ax from the weapons sprues, while the other is getting a spear based on a bamboo skewer. I'll be adding a proper spear to the tip of the skewer made out of greenstuff, but I need to make it first.
  6. I, Echoside, will be undergoing this awesome challenge as my Dragon and paints have arrived from Denton. I have chosen the victim of Kyphrixis, The Copper Dragon for this 3-star challenge. Will be using green and red liner to prime. My rolls: So after his bath, it was picture time! I think he will end up being a Strawberry Dragon! First off, I sorry for the Cut/Paste first post, but it was fitting. Secondly, Kai (the moniker I've given to him) got himself primed up and ready for more layers while out at a miniature painting event at a local gaming store. Such a splendid way to start the challenge. I bathed the base unit in Sepia Liner, as I don't believe the base was to be done strictly in the color scheme of the dragons. Kai himself was bathed in the Red liner, which is very purple if you ask my eyes. The wing membranes were done in the Green Liner. I'm hoping for some interesting undershading effects once the 3 primary colors start to roll on. I've blocked out in my head what scales are going to be which shades and such, I'm just hoping I have the skills to bring whats in my head out on the dragon himself. But without further ado, picture time!
  7. I got two Efreetis in my recent Reaper order. Out of the two one had far more gap lines than the other, so I opened the one that would take less effort to work on first since it's been awhile since I have properly tinkered with a mini. First thing's first, gap filling! This model had quite a lot of mold lines too, I dealt with most of them with an xacto knife and a file. The Bones Black material is brittle enough to handle a file if you're careful unlike the white Bones counterpart. While priming I noticed that part of one of her horns was missing, must have snapped off during shipping or during my work on her. Touched it back up with some more green stuff, just waiting for it to cure before I prime over it. In the mean time, there is nothing stopping me from popping into Procreate to play around with a colour scheme. I wanted to try something a but different than other painting examples I had seen. Still incorporating the red and gold, just in different ways.
  8. When I got my Bones III Obsidian Crypt I had a little idea. https://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore/crypt/latest/77637 I put Kaladrax ( now Discontinued) on it. She made it her throne! I also included some pieces of the Bones III Graveyard Set, and a few other pieces I had laying around. One statue is broken because Kaladrax swung her tail when she landed. I made some roses with the basing stuff @knarthex had send me a while ago. Also my first real attempt at marble. I made red marble and white/yellow marble for the Crypt. WIP here if interested. http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/75896-kaladrax-on-mausoleum-by-glitterwolf/& So without further ado here is Kaladrax on her Mausoleum! Hope you like it. Feel free to like, comment and praise. Any complaints...talk to the Dragon!
  9. Just finished painting a copy of the Bones version of Satheras using two hues plus black and white: I started him during our last paint day as an example of how you could use a single brown to get quite a few different looks. After I got home, I decided to keep on with a very limited palette. Paints used (all Golden Fluid Acrylics): Burnt Sienna Dioxazine Purple Zinc White Carbon Black Not intended as a competition mini, but it was a really interesting exercise and the result, I think, has some virtue as a piece of art.
  10. My wife bought me most of the IMEF minis as a gift summertim some time back. I just need one more(not counting the Bulldog in Bones 4) and I'm planning to paint them all at once...but it makes sense to have one done as a test piece. Sure. That's my story. Also with him is a papercraft APC, because of course these guys will need armored support!
  11. Rembrant van Rjin 1606-1669 One of the most famous of the Old masters. I decided to try and replicate his middle period. The largest change I made was using a limited palette, and mixing all the colors I used. Many teachers have recommended this style and it finally sunk in USE MORE PAINT ON THE PALLET. Mix a shade and higlight version of your main color. have it all right there, in large quantities. I tried for smooth blends but got carried away by the speed of this style on the archer. The club wielder has better results. Each Lizardman uses only: Russet brown, chestnut brown, Palamino gold, and carnage red - 4 color palette + B&W (there was also a few drops of green ink for the shield) I also tried to use light to create a different emotion for the lizardmen - with mixed success. still, this experiment has changed my style for the better. WIP Thread
  12. Maglok

    77352: Demi-Lich

    Painted up the demi-lich from the Bones line. He is rather small. Decided against any OSL, it would just drown out the skull.
  13. Maglok

    77326: Lemures

    I painted up two lemures from the Bones line. I tried to closely match the colorscheme I have used to paint some lemures from otherworld miniatures. I am pleased with the results. (Scroll down for family picture!) They were pretty tough to paint, for they did not have a lot of texture to them. Earlier Bones and all that. Still fun to do. :)
  14. I recently finished painting Borin Ironbrow! I started out just wanting to paint a simple dwarf. I recently discovered and really liked the blue/green color of the cloak so that's where I started. I then did most of the cloak and NMM and then got to the shield and I didn't know what to do. Someone suggested painting it copper/bronze/... so I thought why not do SENMM copper!?!? This is the result! I hope you like it!
  15. Last year @Pochi painted me a barbarian as an exchange fig. (located here: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/80953-spring-exchange-brand-oathblood/&tab=comments#comment-1717270). More specifically she painted me a barbarian inspired by the song Holy Diver by Dio (I tend to put odd things for inspiration in me exchange forms). I liked him so much that I based my current 5th Ed. character off of the fig. Now Pochi's fig is far too precious (my precious!!) to go on the gaming table, so I've been using a bare Bones version with the intent of painting him "any day now". Now that we've hit 7th level, I'm actually getting around to paint something. But, since I need him for the weekly game, I'm painting an alternate version first, then I'll swap figs and work on the Brand Oathblood version. So I'm starting with 77373: Cuth Wolfson, Barbarian. This will depict Dio wielding his mighty great axe, Eloise. Now Cuth's default axe was a touch....limp, so I dug out the Bones III weapons pack and picked a nice stiff replacement. Much better. Now just a little putty to fill in the gap and he'll be ready for his bath before linering.
  16. I have very fond memories of gnolls from playing World of Warcraft. I don't know why I enjoyed them so much but I did. So when I pulled out these gnolls to paint, I knew I was going to paint them like World of Warcraft gnolls. This is the Bones Blacktongue gnoll.
  17. Pochi

    Dire Bear - 77494

    This is the Bones dire bear. I have been painting some stuff for D&D. Nothing in particular, just things that might be useful. I figured a bear, dire or otherwise might come in handy and he was quick and easy to paint!
  18. The second gnoll I painted with inspiration from the gnolls of World of Warcraft. This is the Bones Toghra.
  19. The Bones Giant Cobra. I saw a lot of neat ones painted with stripes and different patterns but decided to go simple with mine. I did drybrush highlights with some bronze and copper to give him a little shimmer and he looks really good on the table. My players are worried because they fought a giant snake last session (I didn't have him painted) so they are worried there is another one coming. You never know!
  20. This one is not my work, but my wife's first rpg mini ever. She put a huge amount of work in and is really proud of her. The shine is because the day it was finished, my dullcoat decided to be a berk and refused to actually be matte.
  21. Sorry for being away from the Forum for so long. So ... how does one pronounce "peryton"? I've usually said it like "keratin" (stress on the first syllable), but I suppose it could rhyme with "enlighten" (stress on the second syllable) instead. I realized only weeks ago that I had been mispronouncing "wyvern" all my life, and the first syllable is long like "five", not short like "shiv". Anyway... I taught a class called "Fur, Feathers, and Scales" class at ReaperCon 2018. I used the Bones peryton as a demonstration, because of the big feathered wings. The first-edition Monster Manual gives the coloration of a peryton as blue-black head, black horns, green wings, and blue chest (male) or drab chest (female). I showed my students pictures of real hawks and falcons, most of which have dark tips on their wing feathers, and sometimes a series of dark stripes. Then I painted one of the peryton's wings to have stripes like that (black on green). Now I've decided to paint the whole figure, to at least a good tabletop standard. I attached it to a 50mm round base, sculpted some extra rocks, and sculpted the skeleton of a past victim (a Reaper pewter skull, plus bones made from putty). Perytons bite the hearts out of their prey, so I made the skeleton's ribcage open/broken in front. Here's how my version looked after I spent 2 hours slapping on Black Brush-on Primer and White Brush-on Primer, to establish the overall values. The primer didn't fully cover the striped green wing from my ReaperCon class. Enjoy, Derek
  22. There are some minis that are absolutely brilliant in Bones. This is not one of them. But it's a mini that works for a fellow players for our Curse of Strahd campaign, so... First problem, the staff was really bent out of shape. Impressive since it's connected to both his hand and the cloak. A quick boil and then ice bath to care of that. Then there were three mold lines. Unfortunately extensive on the outstretched arm and on the smooth cloak. Once those were taken care of, I glued him to a base, splashed on the brown liner and then began to block in colors. Afterburn Grey, peacock green, tanned shadow, and dessert stone were the primary colors I used to start with. That was last week, and it was enough to get the okay from my player. So tonight, I worked on him some more. Added Rosy flesh, nut brown, some black lining, and Marigold for the hair. I think I'm going to wash the hair with something a little more orange red, then bring up the color more with the blond triad. Not sure what to do with the leather bandoleer, but I'm thinking maybe a red leather?
  23. This troll has been sitting for a year half painted, finally finished him. Any suggestions welcome.
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