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Found 149 results

  1. I don't have a blog, and I am not veteran or post enough content to justify making one - so while these musings may be better served in that format, I will leave it here for anyone who is interested to view and chime in. It just so happens that my best friend happens to work at Rustoleum as a colorist; so lately I have been picking his brain since he has an extensive knowledge about pigments, paint make up, and the chemical intricacies therein. As I have delved further and further into the hobby, I have been looking more into the deep subjects of color theory and how paint is made/composed. After reading James Gurney's Color and Light, as well as Michael Wilcox's Blue & Yellow Don't Make Green, I was really intrigued about what exactly paint is and how exactly color interactions work. Now I am guilty as the next person in owning WAY too many paints - not to say anything about minis! While color mixing may seem irrelevant to some, understanding how paints function can help even those of us who own a complete gamut of convenience mixed colors. This post is about exploring more of the technical and "scientific" aspects of paint and color theory to hopefully assist others in understanding the what and why of paint. Rethinking Paint Colors - Subtractive Color: Up until recently, I have always viewed the primary colors as Yellow, Red and Blue, and with those you can mix secondary colors; Green, Orange, and Purple. While this is technically true after a fashion, the difficulty lies with pigments themselves. Pigments do not actually *contain* color. Instead, they absorb most of the light spectrum *except* a specific wavelength of color. As Michael Wilcox states, "Of all the pigments available to the painter, none can be described as pure in hue. There is simply no such thing as a pure red, yellow or blue paint." That means chemically, there isn't a paint pigment out there that returns a pure Red - unlike in say digital art where a specifically purely calibrated hue can be made, paint is limited by the properties of the physical pigments themselves. As Michael Wilcox theorizes with a colour bias wheel (bottom-right), primary pigments almost certainly lean towards secondaries. This follows the concept of the Munsell Wheel (bottom-left). You may have heard of a split-complimentary color palette, and this is the reason why. Artistically, these have been described as "Warm" and "Cool" versions of the primaries, but scientifically, they are colors that absorb or reflect more of a particular wavelength. There are Violet-Reds (Cool Reds, often called "Crimson") and Orange-Reds (or Warm Reds, that lean more towards Orange), Violet-Blues and Green-Blues, and Orange-Yellows and Green-Yellows. One the concepts to understand when mixing paints is that you are not creating a color, but rather you are effectively destroying colors and what remains is what is returned to the eye. Referencing the above color bias wheel, if you were to mix a Violet-Blue and a Violet-Red together, both containing pigment(s) that return a great deal of Violet wavelength, the little remaining Blue/Orange and Red/Green wavelengths in each pigment would cancel each other out, leaving the Violet behind. This would yield a more saturated or more pure hue of Violet. Conversely, mixing a Green-Blue and a Orange-Red ("Warm" Red) would be a very desaturated Violet, with more of a gray tone. Keep in mind that this doesn't make a color "bad"; desatured tones by including more complimentary colors is a very useful tool! In fact, for making shadows, using a great deal of complimentary colors to desaturate is a great technique. The problem is when these colors come about unexpectedly; after all, you can have a very "intense" Red and a very "intense" Blue, but mixing them may not produce a very intense Violet if they are "moving away" from each other. Now that is all being said, it is time to forget it...sort of. RGB is based upon the concept of Additive Mixing, or how colored light interacts. With additive mixing, fully saturated Red/Green/Blue light will produce White light. However, in paint pigments, it should be pretty obvious that mixing pigment primaries of Red/Yellow (or Green)/Blue together will not yield White. This is due to Subtractive Mixing, where pigments effectively destroy each other ala Thunderdome in Mad Max, and only the survivors reflect light back. A more modern approach to color theory and pigments is CMYK or Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and "Key" (or commonly known, Black). Adding these colors into the standard primaries gives us the "Yurmby" wheel. If you have looked at a color printer, for example, the colors used are NOT Blue/Red/Yellow, but rather Cyan/Magenta/Yellow. This is because due to the subtractive nature of pigment/ink mixing. These colors present a larger printable gamut (i.e. range) of color; for example, without White, it is difficult to produce a Pink tone with Red vs Magenta. A thin Magenta will read more Pink than a thin Red. Printers do not use White ink and instead leverage the paper for white, effectively printers are printing in an underpainting style. However, we as artists DO use White pigments and this makes things a bit more complicated as we do work with Tints (White) and Shades (Black). Like most science, the direct answer regarding an accurate color wheel is: it is complicated. For observable light, there is a bit more consistency and repeatability. However, when working with "tiny wavelength absorbing/reflecting mirrors" of pigments, things become a bit more complex. Additionally, there are other aspects that that go beyond the basics, such as the effect of specular and perception of color. It gets really heady when you start dipping into Kubelka-Monk Theory and K/S. Paint Composition: Most paint is made up of 3 parts: Pigment - particles that absorb and reflect certain wavelengths of light. Binder - The 'medium' or 'glue' which holds the pigment in suspension and forms a film. For acrylic paint, this is the actual acrylic part. Solvent - The liquid that allows paint to be viscous; as it dries, it allows the binder and pigment to harden forming the film. For acrylic paint, the solvent is water. Adjusting the ratios of these can have some interesting, and sometimes disastrous effects in terms of the stability of the paint. For example, introducing too much solvent, and the binder and pigment lattice structure can break apart. This can cause "coffee staining" or splotchy spots where the bonds pull apart, leaving areas without a film at all. The pigments in paint are held in a suspension. Like hot chocolate mix, there are tiny particles that are suspended in a liquid. Given enough time or evaporation, the liquid will leave these granules behind. If you have ever mixed a packet of Swiss Miss cocoa, you know that the mix can settle at the bottom - and that attempting to add dry powder to a liquid is more difficult than adding a liquid to a dry powder. This is another reason why mixing your paints is important because it is easy for the heavier pigments to tend to settle out of the binder/solvent solution. Speaking of solutions, that is the main difference between paints and inks. Inks, specifically alcohol inks that use dyes, are a solution. The staining dye actually becomes homogeneous with the liquid. Just like dissolving sugar or extracting coffee/tea, there isn't any particulates that separate out. However, most dyes are not lightfast - a property that will be discussed in more detail further. Acrylic inks that use pigments are not "true" inks insomuch as they are composed just like an acrylic paint. The difference being the smaller size of the pigments and the viscosity of the binder/solvent being much thinner. Paint Additives Outside of the 3 main components for paint composition, there are also some optional additives that some manufacturer's include in their paint. These can be things such as: Extenders/retarders, which delay the setup of the paint film, allowing for more mixing to occur before drying. Thinners, which dilute the pigment to binder ratio, usually increasing translucency and viscosity - commonly this is done with water for acrylic paints. Flow Aid, which reduces the surface tension of paint, allowing it to flow more easily and level - Reaper is known for adding a bit of flow aid into their formulation. Opacifiers, which increase the opacity of a paint - usually some type of calcium or bicarbonate. Matting agents, which reduces the glossiness of acrylic medium. Fillers, which are commonly used in student or inexpensive paints to reduce cost and add mass without adding more pigment. You can add some of these additives yourself to your favorite brand of paint to adjust the handling qualities. The most commonly added is solvent/thinner in the form of water to "thin your paints" to reduce the viscosity and lower the overall density of the paint, building up multiple thinner layers of paint films in a "layering" fashion.
  2. I'm a fan of the Scale 75 paints, they have a new range called artist colors. The paint comes in tubes. I wonder if anyone has tried these? You're thoughts on these?
  3. My husband and I run the Paint and Take table at a local convention, Recruits. It's held at the high school, admission is free for all area students, games are child friendly, etc. We get really good turnout. The paint table is free for kids of all ages, even grownup kids, and it is funded entirely with donations. All of the figures, all of the paint, water cups, brushes, etc come from the wonderful community we have here, from the internet, and from vendors. It's typical for me to arrive early Saturday to set up and find one or more anonymous boxes of figures or paint waiting. A couple of years ago at Reapercon folks helped fill a box with mouslings for me to give away. I could not do this without the support I get from the painting and gaming community. So here is this year's class: (BTW, if you got stuff in your Bones4 core that you do not want, find me at next year's Reapercon, I will see it goes to a good cause) This is our table about ten minutes after setting up. Busy the entire day. Some of the fine works of art created by the kids who participated. They look forward to this all year. Got to pick up more baby dragons next year. I only had the one and it resulted in crying. :( More later,
  4. Good morning guys! Q: if buying one of the reaper core sets (108 bottle set), what's the main difference in them? I'm looking into buying a complete paint set. I've been doing a ton of research and have settled on a reaper core set (i already own several reaper paints and love them). I know that everyone suggests a blend of several companies based on which has the best, e.g. yellow, or metallics. I just want to make it simple, buy a set and build from there. I'll mostly be painting 40k and privateer press models with some terrain and 3d prints mixed in (i have a cheapo set of acrylics from Michael's for large terrain and 3d prints). I've also considered the Vallejo Model set, and Army Painter Mega Set. Thanks in advance!
  5. A noobish question, should I thin down reaper washes? Or are they ready to use out of the dropper? Sorry if this has been asked.
  6. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cephalopodstudios/cuttlefish-colors-a-hobby-paint-line/description About Cuttlefish Colors is a hobby acrylic paint line that we here at the studio have developed. These paints work and blend very well with other major brands of hobby paint on the market right now, but at a much cheaper price tag. Why use Cuttlefish colors Beastclaw Raider painted using Cuttlefish Colors For years we used just about every other major brand of hobby paint out there, always looking for that perfect color, the smoothest paint and the most cost effective. Lets face it, if you’re into tabletop war-gaming you know how expensive this hobby can be. We were so tired of spending 5-6 dollars a bottle on paint, only to have them dry out with their flip top lids, the dropper styles were great but so difficult for us to get locally, and the consistency of the color varied greatly. Deathguard Marine painted using Cuttlefish Colors So, ten years ago we began doing research on the properties of hobby paint, how it’s made and where we can get the materials to do this. After hundreds of failed attempts to “make” our own paint and thousands of dollars spent on failed formula’s we finally found the one that worked the best. This formula gives you a smooth thin coat with good coverage and blends fantastically with other colors in the line, AS WELL AS other hobby paints on the market. we began to experiment with different pigments and for the past 2 years have been painting miniatures with the paints we would mix up and bottle for ourselves. It was about 6 months ago that our friends and local game group started asking about what colors we used and we told them, Well, We make our own. Ever since that day people have been asking us "Can we buy some of your paint?" After thinking about it and seeing if it was possible...well...here we are! We are very excited to bring our line of hobby paints to everyone, and can't begin to thank you enough for checking us out and hopefully, just hopefully pledging! Thanks from the bottom of our hearts, Cephalopod Studios
  7. I hear horror stories about people getting frozen bottles of paint. Is there any way to tell if the paint has been frozen prior to using it? I was concerned about this when I did my holiday paint order, but it was a little unseasonably warm the day they were delivered. What does frozen paint look like & is there a way to salvage it if it has been frozen?
  8. OK, I don't want to put the cart before the horse, but are Reaper examining the potential for colorshift paints? With those big bugs coming in Bones IV, now (or very soon) might be a good time for some sparkly shiftiness. If this can't be answered, that's OK--nuke away. But I'd be curious to know the ifs and whys (if available). I just suddenly felt like I needed them.
  9. Hey everyone, Having spent the last 4 weeks away from any sort of miniatures (Fun vacation tho!), I'm super eager to paint again, and with my return flight being tomorrow, I thought I'd make this thread as a sort of documentation/to-do list. I want to clear my backlog because I'll be frank I'm sick of staring at unpainted plastic every day and I want to do something remotely productive in these remaining four weeks I have free. I have mostly Warhammer miniatures, though there is some Mantic and Reaper stuff in there. First of all to be done is this charming fellow. A Stormcast chap who I first tested sculpting fur on, which I'm reasonably happy with. A closer look at the fur, which does look like guacamole in this picture. Right now it's a standard basecoat and drybrush fur, but I will re-doing the fur and wet blend it to something like what this fellow has. Have a nice day!
  10. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/picolor/picolor-any-color-anywhere-anytime?ref=discovery Sounds like an interesting paint mixer. Not sure I'd get it myself, but some people on this forum might be interested...
  11. I haven't seen this posted anywhere else on the boards and did not find anything by searching, but RealmSmith has posted an interview from GAMA on YouTube with Ron and Ed. If this has already been posted, please feel free to nuke this post with extreme prejudice. As YouTube is a commercial site, no link but searching RealmSmith and Reaper will get you there. Here are my notes: Pathfinder Paints (!) - 56 new colors, Golarian specific colors, ETA October. Learn to Paint kit expansions, 6 additional colors each and instructions, 4 expansion sets, ETA June or July. Pathfinder Learn to Paint kit being worked on.
  12. Ordered a reasonable amount of paints from an online store that carries Reaper here in Canada.... All of the other paints come across as normal, but this one.... Well, uhm... I'm going to venture a guess it's a goner, or can it be saved? There isn't even a liquid sound when shaking the bottle, just the sound of the agitator stuck in the bottom moving around somewhat.
  13. After a poll this seems to be the best place to put this thread. For the most part I'll stick photos under spoilers because my phone likes to make them large. So I bought a sketchbook today with the intent to catalog and show off all of my paints. I thought it was quite the appropriate book to get. First I made a grid on a page. Then added the title to each column: Name & SKU, None, Base, Wash, Brown Liner, Blue Liner. That's as far as I've gotten. Next I plan on starting to fill out paint names and SKU's. Then I will prime the squares with some plain white brush on primer (Vallejo in this case). I'm really hoping that the paper is thick enough to avoid the water from just being absorbed. If it isn't I will go to the craft store and buy a better book with different paper and can use this for something else later. Each column is a different thickness of paint/what I'll be putting it over. So None is straight out of the bottle, Base is thinned enough for a base coat, Wash is thinned down to a wash consistency, and Brown and Blue Liner will have each of them put over the primer and then a base consistency paint over that. I'm going to spend some time filling out the names and SKU's and then I'll get to priming the squares. Might go back and go over the lines with a sharpie or pen to make them a little more apparent where the lines are for my sake. ETA: I already have a spreadsheet of all of the paints I own and then sub-sheets broken down by line/company. I think there is a way to put color samples into the sheet but I've yet to figure it out. So I'm making this so I don't have to pull out all of my paints when I need to color scheme something. I can just pull out the book and go from there. It'll be much more efficient for me.
  14. I have been painting minis for a few years now and my paint collection has evolved quite a bit. I started with a few bottles of Tamiya paints Then I went into a KS called Paintdecor and got a goodly collection there, plus a few Vallejo paints as they are available retail here in Nagoya Japan, whereas Reaper is not. Got a couple Dwarvenforge paints around the same time also. Then I started to get more into Reaper, with a lot of buying, including a learn to paint kit and my collection expanded And just today I got a couple nice Vallejo paint racks so it looks a lot more organized I also have one of almost all the Dwarven Forge paints but not a good pic of them right now. They are off to the left in the third pic. And in a few weeks, I'll be getting another 35ish reaper paints I bought last year including the holiday bundle. I will update with a pic of those when they arrive. I know it is not a huge collection, but compared to its beginnings, it is a whole lot better. Whatta ya got?
  15. I'm wondering what people use to reproduce natural or light varnished oak and pine wood. Darker woods and weathered wood aren't too difficult with Reaper's paint selection, but I can't seem to find the right combo to get anything close to natural oak or pine - either the "neutral" light wood color of oak or the yellower tones of pine and varnished oak.
  16. Hi, i have many Reaper Colours in triads, but i dont know if maybe the store that sold them to me some years ago had an old batch or else, as i see that some of the colors are not as shown in the reaper site. So wanted to ask anybody that has the "undead skin tones" and "vampiric skintones" , if you have any pics that show the true colour of the "moldy skin", "bloodless skin", "ghoul skin", "vampiric skin", "vampiric highlight" and "vampiric shadow", as i want to compare and determine if maybe my colors are wrong or something :( and see what i need to add to them to make them be as intended :) Thanks for the help !
  17. My challenge is to finish the blue bin in the coming two weeks: There's some extra random stuff I might get to. I'm also starting with Mrs Claus and the cat dragon. And if that's not enough, one of my KS projects fulfilled:
  18. Bit of an opinion piece here, but what are the Reaper MSP colors you find that you can't live without? What colors do you think should be in everyone's collection? A list of recommended paints for aspiring artists looking to get started with Reaper MSP. (Note: This list is neither complete, exhaustive, or required. It is just to provide you with a few ideas about where to start.) 1. Nightshade Purple (I lied, this one is pretty much required) 2. Walnut Brown 3.Bronzed Skin 4. Liner (Brown especially) 5. Clear Magenta 6. Dragon Green 7. Ritterlich Blue 8.Rust Brown 9. Ochre Gold Triad 10. Carnage Red 11. Snow Shadow 12. Dark Skin Shadow 13. Corporeal Shadow (may be out of print) 14. Carnival Purple (out of print) 15. Amethyst Purple 16. Terran Khaki 17. Linen White 18. Ghost White 19. Soil Triad 20. Stone Triad 21. Palomino Gold 22. Blackened Brown 23. Bloodthirsty Triad 24. Peacock Green 25. Dragon Red 26. Nightmare Black 27. Pure/Solid Black/White 28. Highlight Orange 29. Red Brick 30. Dark Elf Skintone Triad 31. Rosy Skin Triad 32. Oiled Leather
  19. For those that put beads in their paint to help with shaking what sized beads do you use? I was looking at some 8mm hematite beads but I want to be sure I get something that won't stick in the tip.
  20. Hi all! I haven't posted here in a while as I had to take a break from painting to do some remodeling on my house. That was two years ago. Finally able to get back to this hobby I love so I wanted to organize my paint desk some. I designed some paint racks to store my mini paints and figured that someone else might benefit from them as well. I posted them on Thingiverse for all to use. Totally free and open source!! I am adding to them as people ask for additional brands of paint and other configurations. If anyone prints them and needs some changes or additional options just let me know and I will be happy to see what I can do. Looking forward to getting involved again in this great community!! Without further blabbing here are the links to the units: Large Straight - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2531450 Small Straight - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2549451 Inside Corner - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2543779 Outside Corner - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2588073 Happy Painting!!!
  21. Forgive me if there is an obvious answer for this, I've never been to Reapercon before. I am needing quite a few Reaper paints. Will they be for sale at the Con? If so, would they have a Show discount? If not, I'll just go ahead and order some from Reaper now. Thanks
  22. Right then, here's another question about the Reaper paint line. The last question was two months ago but I still feel like I'm bugging everyone. Anyway, I've decided to finally take the plunge and do some serious paint ordering for my solo game miniatures. Before I order at the end of the month (to get that Diva model for nothing), there seems to be a hiccup: there are a few different black paints in the line. I'm looking for a black to basecoat... black, funnily enough. There's Pure Black, Dragon Black, Noir Black, Nightmare Black, etc. Which of these (and the others not listed) would be closest to Citadel's Abaddon Black? Some of the blacks have a blue hue, brown hue, or whatever for different looks, but it's hard to tell from the sample mockups which ones have those hues and which don't. If anyone could break those down for me, I'd be grateful.
  23. Hello every body, this will be here not to show off anything amazing or impressive. Just something that took me five and a half hours to do. Nothing to impressive or anything like that. Its a fairly simple paint job for this old miniature. It has been sitting on my portable painting desk for many years now, and I felt like it was time to finally paint it. So I could use it in Dungeons and Dragons if I ever played a Dwarf again or just to use in anything with Dwarves in it really. With the new system of being able to upload photos straight to here from a device, it may be a little weird. I have never used the new Reaper system for photos so lets see how it works. I will still be explaining everything to the best of my ability. All of the paints i used besides one were all Reaper Paints. So, lets get started. Okay, so these four photos are of the Dwarf miniature as a whole. I had to paint over the entire mini with black because it had taken some damage to the prime that covers it. After i had painted the entire thing I let it dry and took the pictures so I wouldn't forget to take them. Next I painted on the metallic colors that i knew i was going to do and I could see. This included the small amount of Chain mail showing under his massive beard, the large Warhammer and his shiled. These were done first in Shadowed Steel. Then I did the few detail pieces that I wanted in Antique Gold. After I painted those few things I realized that I hadn't painted the Rune Stone he is standing on. So I quickly mixed up a wash of the color... well Stone. I forget who the Stone wash is made by but I added some water and I think Glaze Medium. Chaoshead will yell at me in the comments to tell me i'm wrong since i was using most of his paints. Anyways, I did a couple of coats of the Stone wash and moved on to let that dry for a while. While I was letting the Stone wash dry I went on to other colors. I pulled the Rainy Grey out to do the fur that lines the inside of his cape, not realizing I had missed some it will show up later. This step was fairly easy when I was painting it on, but then again the entire thing to me seemed easy and I don't really know why. After the inside of the cape i moved on wards and started to paint Leather. I used Ruddy Leather for anything leather on the Miniature. I started with the gloves then moved on afterwards. Alright, in these few photos I painted more leather onto his sleeves, belt pouch, boots and the bottom of his Chain mail shirt. This step frustrated me because I accidentally painted over some of the metal, so I had to go back and paint the metallics again. I then moved on to some detail work that may have taken the most time to do... I think. On the Rune Stone, I used Breonne Blue to add some color to the... Stone. XD I wanted to paint the runes from the beginning of this small project. I think the Breonne was a good choice for the runes in the first place. Here I had finally painted his massive beard. I used Mahogany Brown for his beard since it was the only one within my small amount of paints that would work. I liked my choice of color for his beard though. In these three i painted the trim of the cape with the Ruddy Leather. I painted it very carefully to make sure I didn't get any on anything else. I already had to repaint Metallic colors earlier and i didn't want to do it again. Continuing with the cape i painted it Leaf Green and had to do it a couple of times to make sure it was one solid color. Painted the face with Tanned Skin and then used Grass Green to paint his eyes. Again this is all just a super simple paint job for this mini and is just meant to be a good, fun, little thing I like to do. As a final thing to finish this Miniature off was a nice little touch that I thought of last second. I painted the small heart on his cape with Blood Red. The Dwarf is done! He is done in all of the simplest ways to paint that I know how. XD If you all enjoyed and have some tips or anything to leave for myself. Please leave a comment and i guess stay tuned to here or another one I post in the future.
  24. Hello everyone! So I had to move cross-country about 2 1/2 years ago and had to box up all my hobby stuff. But now, circumstances require I get back into things (and I still have all those unpainted Bones IIs). So I managed to track down all my supplies and paints, but some settling may have occurred in transit - nearly all of my paints had fallen over from their upright positions and sat that way for the entire time. I have almost 40 bottles; most have been opened and used at least once, but none leaked at least. When turned upright the paints didn't immediately run down to the bottom, but they still slosh around when shaken. I haven't tried using them yet. Would they still be good, or should I take the loss, or is there a way to save them? Most are basic colors but a few were special promos that aren't being made again, and it would be a shame to lose those ☹️ Edit: I should clarify these are all Reaper paints.
  25. Hi, i saw on amazon a paint mixer/stirrer that its similar to the ones for drinks or coffe, only this one is for hobbist paint, its brand is badger. I custom made one that its really similar to this one and actually fits inside reaper bottles. I just used it on some reaper and vallejo paints that i have for a while, some of them especially the vallejo ones were kind of gummy with pigment on the bottom, i used my custom stirrer and solved the issue! . Thing is, it works very well, but on reaper i feel as if it makes the paint less dense, and in some colours like pale saffron and lemon yellow this is more evident, is covers well but feels a little similar to watercolor in its consistency . Maybe its because the stirrer is quite potent and spins very fast, so wanted to ask help to anyone that have experience using a stirrer for mixing paint and also ask Anne Foerster or some people that actually work with the composition of paint, if any of you are seen this, please help ! ;) will really appreciate it. If i use this product can i harm the reaper paints that i have? Also on the other hand mixing the paint like this can have any positive effect as well? Thanks for all the help, i always count on this forum when i need some important facts or tips ;)
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