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Found 322 results

  1. ttuckerman

    Happy Birthday Pingo!

    Felicitations on your personal solstice!
  2. This is the Reaper Bones 77371 Basilisk sculpted by Julie Guthrie. It's quite small - about the size of a large dog, with a wonderfully grouchy visage. I painted it up fairly quickly to illustrate a video about how yellow and black can be mixed to make greens. This was an example of the less vivid greens (For a really vivid yellow-and-black green, see my She-Hulk Show-Off thread). All the colors on the critter were mixed just from yellow (mostly Yellow Ochre, but also a little Hansa Yellow), black, and white. The video is here, if anyone cares to watch it.
  3. This is Reaper's magnificent 50212 "Incredible Woman," sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. She's a great figure that can be painted up like a lot of (tall - she's a big one) women superheroes. Wonder Woman is on my wish list, and maybe Captain Marvel one day. This version is Marvel's She-Hulk from her classic days as one of the Fantastic Four, replacing Ben Grimm for a time. As a materials and techniques note, I didn't use any green or blue pigments in her skin. It's all mixed from yellow and black. This was partly to prove a point and is kind of central in the art video I posted on YouTube last week: Yellow and Black Make Green. Enjoy!
  4. Well, I've gone and done it. I got a YouTube channel and have started making a series of videos on matters of paint and painting. Okay, I say "series of videos" all grandly, but at the moment it's one video and a planned syllabus. But I have more planned! This is pretty much my first video ever. I was helped a great deal by my family members who have more experience in this. The first video is a paint comparison, looking at one of the new Liquitex Acrylic Gouache paints (Quinacridone Magenta, PR122) and considering its suitability for miniatures painting. Enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwonRqv0Xgk
  5. This miniature is 15503C Nyamaunir Piratin, a catgirl pirate from Das Schwarze Auge (The Dark Eye, Germany's 1980s answer to Dungeons and Dragons). She's a little Old School and a little short even for that. I like that she looks like a cat who is a person in sensible pirating clothes. There was a WIP thread, but it didn't get very far.
  6. This is Stonehaven's Half-Orc Librarian, a pleasantly sinister and unassuming character. The quote in the title of the thread is from Neil Gaiman. Comments et alia welcome, natch. WIP thread here.
  7. This is Stonehaven's Half-Orc Nobleman, another nice and eccentric steampunk character. The quote in the title of the thread is from Beau Brummell. Comments, etc. welcome. WIP thread here. This is all paint:
  8. This is Stonehaven's Half-Orc Mechanist, a nice little character for the more open-minded steampunk campaign. The quote in the title of the thread is from Gail Carriger, author of the "Soulless" steampunk series. I actually finished him around Christmas, but I never put up the Show Off thread. So here he is. Questions, critiques and comments welcome. WIP thread here.
  9. This is the mermaid from the old Grenadier boxed set #6004, "Monsters of Mythology" from their Fantasy Lords range. I used to have the set, once upon a time. This was one of my favorite figures from it (though I painted it very differently back in the day and I am pretty sure my memories of how well I painted it are seriously rose-tinted). There isn't a WIP thread. And because I do like to play around with photographic backgrounds and water effects:
  10. Sobek was a complex crocodile god of the ancient Egyptians. He was god of fertility, wild sexytimes and strength, and also a protector against the ravages of the river Nile and its inhabitants. The khopesh was a kind of ancient Egyptian sword evolved from a battle axe. The one on this sculpt is a little thicker and more swordlike than most of the ones I've seen, which makes it sturdier on a miniatures scale. The figure is Reaper's 14381, Nefsokar Devourer of Ammat, sculpt by Bob Ridolfi. I didn't make a WIP thread. I was halfway done with him before I realized that he was supposed to be a stone statue with cracks and chips in the stone. Maybe another time I will paint a version of him like that, but in this case I overlooked the texture and painted him with fairly realistic crocodile and corroded bronze colors. And because I like to play around with photography and backgrounds:
  11. This is 03415, Lanura Windsong, Elf Sorcerer, sculpted by Julie Guthrie. She's an appealing sculpt -- and popular, judging from all the painted versions in the store and the Inspiration Gallery. I picked her up years ago after seeing someone's lovely version on these forums, and now I've gotten round to her. She has high boots and a long coat and a cute scarf over short tousled curls. I think of her as a sort of corsair or pirate, maybe, with lots of wands and things. I am looking forward to painting all those spheres on her like colored crystal. I have been trying to limit the number of female minis I paint with bare midriffs, but she's just so dang cute! All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics, except where noted. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers. I started laying in her skin tone with the darks pure Burnt Umber and the lights a golden-bronze mix of Burnt Umber, Yellow Ochre, and a little Titanium White. I also am spending some time on each pass tucking paint into all the tiny white dots where the paint failed to get into a nook or cranny. I don't normally paint much with pure black, but here I used some Carbon Black to color her hair and as a wash to lay in a few darker shadows on her and start to contour her face and eye sockets. Then I picked up some more highlights with the golden-bronze again, and a little more pure black shading. And then look, it's a face! Her sclerae are a pale grey mixed from Titanium White and a little Carbon Black. Her pupils are pure Carbon Black, highlights are pure Titanium White. Lips a base of Red Iron Oxide shaded with Burnt Umber and Quinacridone Magenta. Some more contouring with the bronze and Umber shadows and Bob's your uncle.
  12. I thought I had a WIP thread for her, but apparently not. I know I posted a half-done photo of her once, long ago. At any rate, here is a blast from the past and my past as well, the long-languishing Reaper 59037, Deadlands Noir Femme Fatale, sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. And because I like to play around with backgrounds:
  13. It's time again for a year-end roundup of the figures I managed to finish last year. These are the figures I finished during the calendar year of 2018, which was, let me tell you, another ... interesting year. January-March
  14. Well, now. This is a bit of an unusual project. Earlier this year @malefactus kindly sent me some unpainted miniatures that he thought I could get some use out of. Among them was an already based and primed copy of Reaper's 14016, Judas Bloodspire, Necropolis Warlord, sculpted by the legendary Werner Klocke. I had already painted a quickie version the Bones version of the sculpt, 77160: Judas Bloodspire, Vampire and had discovered how fun the sculpt was, so I was pleased to have another to paint, especially since it was mounted on one of malefactus' inimitable bases. I am not entirely sure how malefactus put this together. The central cylinder and the base seem to be wood. He sculpted pavement on the upper base and added something like moss and his signature mushrooms and primed the whole thing in black with white brushed over it. In transit the cape (whose attachment is always a delicate piece of this figure) had come loose, so I cleaned the glue off it and set it aside to paint separately and rejoin later. While playing around with how to attach the cape I discovered a different angle of attachment from the standard pose which appears to be more stable, and which I plan to try. More details on that later, or you can check out the link. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. Here the figure is almost as malefactus sent it to me. I have set aside his cape and already put a light wash of green on the mossy bits. This was a simple transparent mix of Phthalocyanine Green and Burnt Sienna, my go-to mix for foliage. It's completely transparent and acts like a watercolor wash. I layered on several coats of varying mixes of the two pigments, sometimes adding a little Ultramarine Blue, also a transparent color, or Hansa Yellow Opaque, which despite its name is only semi-translucent. This lets all of malefactus' shading show through. I like to paint skin and especially faces before the rest of the figure. I've been painting up my vampire figures with completely colorless skin mixed from Titanium White and Carbon Black, so I did that here. The metal figure has much more delicate details than the Bones. The fangs are a mix of Titanium White and Yellow Ochre and the lips and eyes are pure Red Oxide and Hansa Yellow Opaque with Carbon Black. For a color scheme I decided on a contrast to my Bones Judas Bloodspire, who had white hair, a red cloak, blue drapery and a rather misunderstood outfit (I had painted him very quickly, only intending him for tabletop use. I fell in love with the sculpt as I painted.) This one will have a dark blueish or purple cape (still thinking about that), a red greatcoat, and brown hair (maybe with some white streaks. I do like white streaks.). I didn't take pix of the hair painting, but you can see the results in the cape-position testing pictures here. His hair was, I believe, underlaid in a medium brown mixed from Burnt Sienna with a little Ultramarine Blue and Yellow Ochre and Titanium White, then glazed with Burnt Umber and maybe some Burnt Sienna too. (Browns are complex!) No highlights yet. I also painted malefactus' paving stones with a cold grey mixed from Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Sienna, and Titanium White, visible in some photos. Next: Beginning the figure.
  15. Apparently I never started a WIP thread for this miniature. This is Reaper's 50304: Rowena Von Graaf, sculpted by Julie Guthrie, which I started painting a long time ago. She's a fun steampunk figure. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers. I decided to paint her with a pretty black face. Here's a close-up of her face. There are tiny white points which are microscopic unpainted pits in the figure. They are much smaller irl than they show up in the photographs. I am slowly (maddeningly) working to fill them in as I go. I decided to paint her underskirt pink. This is Quinacridone Magenta lightened with Titanium White. And the base coat on her dress and spats is straight Red Oxide. And this is where I left her (cough) about a year and a half ago. More to come!
  16. Who says elves have to be sprightly woodland-lovers? (Oh, and hey, @Beagle, I'm painting elves!). I spotted this recent Reaper release, sculpted by Werner Klocke, and thought he looked interesting. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers. I usually start with the skin on character minis. A good mix for Caucasian-type flesh in the pale ranges is straight Burnt Sienna and Titanium White, which is how I started him. I laid in a wash of dark blackish mixed from Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Sienna over his hair and shaded his skin a bit with of Burnt Umber in the skin mix. Went in and painted his face in some detail. Later: More!
  17. This is Reaper's 60184: Meyanda, Android Priestess, from the Pathfinder line, sculpted by Bobby Jackson. I painted her up as a Jadeborn for a game of Exalted. The Jadeborn come in three castes, one of which looks like elves made of jade and the other two look like dwarves made of earth tones. I used this as an excuse to paint up some dwarves, which I hadn't done much of, in the WIP thread, "Jade Green and Seven Dwarfs, here. She was fun to paint. There is a lot of great detail on her.
  18. Hasslefree has some fun sci fi characters, including quite a few space dwarves. This is HG405, Pilot Hayden. I'm not entirely sure, but I think she might be a tribute to Starbuck on the "Battlestar Galactica" remake. She has a cigar and a complex gun. It's the first time I've painted a gun where I'm reasonably happy at how the shiny look turned out.
  19. I am almost certain this RAFM miniature, RAF02802, "Desirée Dark, Mercenary," sculpted by Werner Klocke, is meant to be the character Selene from the "Underworld" series. I painted her up, though, as a regular human. To compare and for the amusement value, here's one of the first figures I painted after coming back to minis after a twenty-year hiatus, a few years ago. It's another version of Selene from "Underworld," this one from Hasslefree (Hasslefree HFA021: Dionne (B)). I ... think my style has changed, some, the last few years.
  20. How slowly has this WIP gone? I started these elves in late spring 2016. Because of events and shake-ups I set aside all my work from that time, but now I have picked them up again. For this WIP I am making a warband of three female and one male Drow with support from a female sorceress Drider. The three women are the wonderful set 03516: DHL Classics: Dark Elves sculpted by the inimitable Sandra Garrity. I'm going to identify each separately because they also have individual SKUs and names and it's easier to keep track of them that way. The man is 14046: Ardynn, Elf Hero sculpted by Werner Klocke; he is not intended as a Drow, but he looks so cranky I think he will do well as one. The Drider is a Bones mash-up of 77182: Arachnid Archer plus the torso of 77057: Juliette, Sorceress, as detailed in this thread. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers. To begin with I painted the three women's weaponry straight Carbon Black, with the thought that I would paint over it later with metallics or iridescents, which always look better against a dark underpainting. I mixed a transparent dark blue-black from Burnt Sienna and Ultramarine Blue and washed it over the three women's skin, and a bit lightly over their hair to begin to work where shadows will be, The first dark elf in the Garrity set is also sold as 02574: Female Dark Elf. The second is also Reaper's 02524: Female Dark Elf Cleric And the third is 02460: Vernicia I then mixed some Titanium White with the blue-black to make a cold blue grey and added rough lights to the skin, and white to the hair. Ardynn I started a little differently, with blue-grey mixes from Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Sienna, and Titanium White and a bit of straight white in his hair from the start. This is my custom-made Drider, primed with Reaper's Brown Liner diluted somewhat: I painted her skin and hair the same way I did Ardynn's. This is the crude beginnings: Next time: Faces! And arghy bits I missed, like Ardynn's hands.
  21. This is the rather old-school 15500f, Female Elf Ranger, from Das Schwarze Auge, Germany's answer to D&D. WIP thread here.
  22. Pingo

    77351 Bones Cultists

    These are Reaper's 77351: Cultists in Bones, sculpted by Bobby Jackson. For some reason this paint was seriously resistant to a matte finish on Bones. Oh, well.
  23. So, uh, these are actual actual Space Marines from Citadel. I got a little sprue of them at Free Comics Day a year or two ago. The date on the sprue said 2005, so perhaps they are obsolete models. I had plans to do them up oddly, maybe sparkly purple or something, but then someone running a game I'm in said "Hey, do you have any space marines?" So I said yes and painted them up bang-up average for Space Marines, going by random images I Googled. Well, almost. The upside-down omega logo kind of insulted my linguistic sensibilities. So I painted one with an upside-down omega, one with an upside-down lambda (symbol of LGBT rights), and one with an upside-down omicron (joke). There's a little tiny bit of NMM gold on their can't-lift-their-shoulders-armor-pieces.
  24. This is Hasslefree HFD104 Drya Lafhelgasdottir, sculpted by Tre Manor, and not, as I identified all through the WIP thread, a Red Box Games dwarf. I think I was confused because she was by Tre Manor. She is also the last, the seventh, of the dwarves I painted for the project "Jade Green and Seven Dwarfs," an effort both to get some dwarves painted up for general gaming use, and to make a group of Jadeborn for a game of Exalted. This is a photo of all the project's figures together:
  25. So I have painted the Bones figure 77160: Judas bloodspire (on the right): He's a magnificent sculpt with a cape that's all over the place. And, indeed, his cape hucked up like fallen angel wings is how he appears in all the in-store images, metal or Bones: https://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore/judas/sku-down/14016 The problem as I see it with this is that it is a very precarious construction. In Bones I felt safe enough to paint away merrily, but I recall stating even in my WIP that I would quake at the challenge of keeping a metal figure of this pinned together. Be careful of what you ask for. Some months ago @malefactus kindly sent me a generous assortment of figures, which included a very nicely based and primed version of 14016: Judas, Necropolis Warlord. Despite his very careful packing, the figure had been jostled enough to loosen the cape (sorry, malefactus!). I set it aside, cleaned off the glue, and reckoned I would paint them separately and rejoin them later. Yesterday I was contemplating how to do so, and whether, where, and how to pin it when I noticed something. I think there is an alternate pose of the cape that may work better. The cape fits on the figure very neatly at three contact points (the sword, the back, and the left hand) if one attaches it at a different angle from all the photos in the store.: While this conformation does not have the amazingly dramatic winglike forms of the standard arrangement, it seems to me it has the potential to be much more stable. Just for fun, here's a close up of his face so far:
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