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Found 324 results

  1. HaPpY BiRtHdAy Pingo! Wishing you have a Wonderful day! In honour of your special day, I request that all forumites refrain from brush licking for the next 24 hours.
  2. These are old Ral Partha sculpts from Iron Wind Metals. They are assorted deckers and /or riggers from the Shadowrun game, i.e. people Of The Future who use computers in a virtual matrix and puppet combat drones in the physical world. It occurs to me that decker miniatures are not much called for, since all of their relevant gameplay is in online virtual personas which don't tend to look like people and in an environment where mapping out positions is impossible, so tabletop gameplay with minis is ... a little diffuse, at best. So I wonder how much demand there actually was for figures of the "meat space" physical reality of the deckers, the people who (this is so '90s a vision of the future) carried big physical keyboards in their hands and had to be physically wired into the computer network, including physical implanted wire plugs in their skulls! I love these figures for their outdated vision of future tech. Also they are lovely little sculpts. Anyhow, I have here the elf man from the set 20-572: Elven Deckers - Male & Female; the woman (who turned out to be an elf) from set 20-524: Riggers & Drones (5); the human woman decker from the set 20-501: Deckers (3);and the orc man decker from the set 20-595: Assets Inc. I: Shadowrunners. At the moment I've primed them with Titanium White and washed them with Burnt Umber. The hair is only blocked in so I can do the faces; it will be elaborated later. I am still working on the faces, although I like this first one: Elves are supposed to be a bit full of themselves, so I tried for a haughty look. Speaking of an obsolete vision of the future, this one is wearing cut-off jeans. I'm dissatisfied with this one's face. Fortunately in-game there are prosthetic "Chibi eyes", so I can paint them over weird and claim that's what they are. This guy is full of personality, although you can really see how bizarrely retro the idea of the tech is. Yep, he has to lug that thing around wherever he goes because there's no way a portable computing and communication device could be made, I dunno, pocket sized. As usual, this thread may be sporadic as my painting time is almost random between art projects.
  3. This was originally a birthday present last year, a fairly simple German resin ship kit for a medieval-style cog. Since I was playing a Githyanki in Dungeons and Dragons at the time, I modeled, painted, and sewed the vessel up into a more or less spelljammer, since named Black Moon's Bane from events in the game. There is a fairly detailed Work-in-Progress thread for this ship, if anyone has questions about materials or techniques. Or you can ask here; that's fine. A list of materials: Resin ship's hull model, wooden dowels, bamboo chopsticks, bamboo kitchen skewers, acrylic paint, brass wire, silk organza, silk taffeta, wooden furniture peg, jewelry findings (barrel clasps, jump rings), jewelers chain, metal necklace charms, glass seed beads, waxed linen bookbinder's thread, waxed linen carpet warp, silk buttonhole thread, cotton twine, metallic polyester yarn, nylon cord, screw eyes, 1/2" zinc fender washer, various glues The bowsprit (left) is a bamboo chopstick painted and wrapped with brass wire. The hatch on the deck (right) looks down over a forested landscape. The ship's rails are painted with (imaginary) red runes on black, then washed over thinly with silver metallic paint. From some angles the rails look silver and the runes are invisible. From others they show clearly. The ship's wheel (visible at the upper deck on the stern) is a charm bracelet charm with the hanging loop filed off. I nailed and glued it to the post (made from a furniture peg) so that it spins freely. It is mounted on a small fender washer so it can be moved around the ship. The runes around the door to belowdecks are imaginary. I may think of more stuff to say later. Right now I'm a little dazed.
  4. This thread may be very sporadic. My painting time is usually between art projects, and these puppies are pretty big. I have gotten started on some frost giants: Reaper's 02599: Frorigh, Frost Giant, 77107: Svetlana, Frost Giant Princess, and 77106: Boerogg Blackrime, Frost Giant Jarl. I am also painting a frost giant from Otherworld Miniatures that is a really nice figure, and a 54mm scale jester I bought by mistake and decided to paint up as a frost giant (he was on sale for such a good price I just assumed he was 28mm scale). The metal figures I primed in my usual fashion, with a layer of white paint followed by a wash of Burnt Umber. For the two Bones figures, however, I used Buglips' recommended method of priming with Reaper Brown Liner. Let me just say this is my first use of Reaper paints, and I was impressed with the handling. Although I thinned the Brown Liner considerably, it gave full coverage of the Bones figures with a single coat. Indeed, the surprisingly dark and greyish liner gave the figures a bronzey metallic look where it went on thinly. Burnt Umber is a dark color when applied thickly, but the contrast between it and Brown Liner was striking. I started painting the giants' skin with a mix of Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Sienna, adjusted to just the blue side of a neutral grey and lightened with various amounts of Titanium White. These are the only color mixes I have used so far. I like to do the faces first so I don't have to worry about them later. (Although I will probably add refinements as I go along because I can never seem to let a part of a figure be done when I am painting it, but always see more places which can be improved.) I figured frost giants would have icy blue eyes. One odd thing, these figures are huge but their eyes are tiny. They were definitely just within the range of my being able to see what I was doing, and I still had to check things with a loupe as I worked. The Reaper frost giant princess, Svetlana, is usually painted as though she were wearing a mask, although I gather that was not the original sculptor's intent. I decided to paint her wearing a mask open at the mouth, showing her mouth and chin. I haven't painted the Reaper jarl's teeth yet, so his face looks a little odd. The older Reaper frost giant is really big. He reminds me a little of a Muppet giant monster. The Otherworld frost giant is really exquisitely sculpted. I should look up the artist. I need to go back and look up the company that made the jester figure. It comes with two alternate heads and is kind of cute. I decided to make this one looking soulfully up and out rather than malevolently down at puny humans like the others. No that he's painted it's harder to see, but under that smiley-looking moustache his mouth is actually set rather sadly.
  5. The fifth and last of the five Bones pirates and an experiment in quick painting.
  6. I quick-painted the five Bones pirates, and this is the fourth. I hated his little moustache, so I ignored it when I painted the figure.
  7. This is the third of the five Bones pirates I did as a quick paint. Since pirates are evil and I already had a drow pirate, I painted him up as a duergar. Underdark pirates FTW.
  8. I did quick paints of the five Bones pirates. This is the second, Barnabus Frost. I pictured him as one of those red-faced redheads, a little WC Fields.
  9. I did some quick paint jobs on the Bones set of pirates. Here's the first, which I painted as a drow for game purposes.
  10. Sculpted by Shawn Lux from a design by Matt Beaumont. I assembled and painted this as a 21st wedding anniversary gift for my husband. Here's a scale shot with Reaper's 03135: B'thuhl, Bathalian Pirate. It's pretty big. It came with a resin head and body, separate hands, a puff of "steam" (which I left out as too difficult for me to pin), and the large smokestack; and metal ears, the small smokestack, and the whistle. This graffiti says "Om mani padme hum" in Sanskrit: I used just two metallic colors, a pure silver and a pure gold, layered with a lot of colors to suggest reflections, grime, rust, and patinas. The base is painted a sort of orchid purple, and those are reflections of it painted on the hands. There is a deluxe version of this figure with a steampunk yin-yang "lotus", but I got the basic version and made my own base from a sort of wooden doily from the craft store which resembled both a lotus and a gear. Comments are appreciated.
  11. These are two octopus-headed psychic baddies, one Reaper's "03135: B'thuhl, Bathalian Pirate", and one a classic "Brain Slayer" from Ral Partha, showing a little of the scale creep of the last twenty years. Their mauve-green complexion comes from mixing Phthalo Green with Quinacricone Magenta. Adjusting the mix can give you anything from purple to a surprising deep blue to blue-green. Privately I think of them as "Fred" and "Charley." EDIT: Oh fruitbats, I forgot to reduce the size of one of the photos. Is that going to be a problem, mods? (And weird, editing added all sorts of annoying font tags which I had to remove manually.)
  12. As you might gather, I am really slow at this. Also my miniatures painting things have been stowed away for the long holiday season. But I have finally finished my first Bones mini, 77188 "Sea Lion", sculpted by Julie Guthrie. I have been intrigued by underwater photography, particularly in shallow clear water under bright sunshine where the lensing effects of the wave ridges create constantly changing lines of glowing pale green on whatever swims under them. So I tried a bit of that on this mini. I had a difficult time capturing the colors accurately in the photographs. Some of them are in front of a neutral gray card, and some in front of crumpled "Tiffany blue" tissue paper, which I thought might give a nice oceanic feel but may have too much reduced the color contrast.
  13. Lathula, Female Barbarian, Reaper 03019, sculpted by Ben Siens, painted by me. I like half-orcs. They always seem to be painted with black hair, but I figured since orcs don't have hair it would be the human parent who provides the hair color. So why not a redhead? I didn't paint her hair shiny, though, because it kind of looks greased up and pulled back. I used this figure in my tutorial on how to paint illusionistic grass.
  14. This was a technique people asked about after I posted these: I'm not terribly comfortable with basing; handling glues and sand and tiny tufts of fake grass leaves me cold and worried about things holding together for games. But I do have a lot of painting experience. I have found I prefer to paint illusionistic bases rather than try to sculpt and assemble them. The above bases grew out of a bit of advice I had gotten to paint the base green before gluing down some fake grass. I started ... and it just kind of developed. I never did get to gluing down grass. And here, step-by-step, is how I did it. I started with this figure, Reaper 03019, Lathula, female barbarian. She's all painted and glued to a one-inch fender washer for stability (because she's a big girl and her base is kind of narrow). Her original broccoli base shows my priming method, paint white and wash with burnt umber. The base coat is a mix of yellow ochre (center left in the photo) and phthalocyanine green (the dark blob at the right). The green mixed between them looks brilliant because the lightweight phthalo floats to the top and the heavy yellow ochre sinks, but the actual color, a sort of olive, is more obvious on the mini. If using Reaper paints, yellow ochre is Palomino Gold and phthalo green is Clear Viridian (Clear Green can be substituted). After the initial coat, which is put on with a normal sable brush, I use small hog's bristle brushes to apply the paint. Any brush that has gone frazzled and rather stiff will do. On the left is the small flat brush I use for initial layers. It's a little bigger for better coverage. On the right is the round hog's bristle brush I use for later, more precise painting. Note that I have deliberately splayed out the hairs on this brush; this is the effect one needs. Any frazzed brush will do. If you have a sable or synthetic brush that has gone wild (especially if it is splaying sideways, very useful), it will produce a gentler blend than these brushes did, more like the ones at the top. The technique is to take a barely damp brush, touch it almost horizontally to the paint, blot most of the paint out, and touch it horizontally to the base with just a touch-and-lift action. This leaves impressions of the bristles on the base which in layers will look like grass. The colors are mixes of phthalo green. I try to alternate a few dark, transparent greens with pale or yellowed opaque greens. Dark transparent greens include mixes of phthalo green with burnt sienna (Chestnut Brown in Reaper paints), ultramarine blue (no equivalent, but Clear Blue is okay), burnt umber (not sure what that is in Reaper), and a touch of black. Light greens include mixes of phthalo with yellow ochre (Palomino Gold) and white, mostly, with the odd touch of hansa yellow (a really bright yellow). The first two layers were a little wet; I could have blotted the brush more. I didn't mind because I was laying on irregular color, but the more fastidious may prefer drier paint and grassy effects right from the start. By now I was using the smaller bristle brush. It's a little out of focus, but you can see how the texture is developing. I decided I didn't like how the broccoli base was going. It looked too much like broccoli. So I changed it to a rock, thinly painting a gray mixed from ultramarine blue, burnt sienna, and white right over the green. Letting the green show through a little makes the rock look more realistic. You can also see how pale grey-green and ivory-colored layers of grass look over the green. I put some more layers of brighter, transparent green on, and another shade of light yellow-green, and this is the result:
  15. Designed by Larry Elmore, sculpted by Jeff Grace. I spotted it in a game store and thought it was way more interesting than the pure eye candy mermaids. I was concerned about the flimsiness of the join between arms and arm sockets, so I pinned them. With very. Tiny. Wires. The arms were mighty thin to begin with. I may have left the pinning wires a bit long, making her upper arms a bit long. I deliberately didn't give her pupils. I wanted her to have preternatural, milky nonhuman eyes. I figured mermaids would not have easy access to metal, so I painted her armor and weapon as if they were made of coral, ivory, and bone. In the fourth picture for some reason the colors came out very bright, but the other pictures are more true to life.
  16. My birthday is imminent (precioussss), and my husband gave me this resin ship model from German manufacturer Gelaendestuecke. I've never done anything like this before: Never worked with resin, never made a ship model, never tried to figure out rigging and sails (they aren't included in the model and even the masts are just dowels at the moment). So ... Woohoo, I have no idea what I'm doing. But I figure it'll be fun figuring it out. Here's the box And the instructions in their entirety The hull and the deck The wooden bits, the mast, bowsprit, and railings The cabin has a few issues. Note the little spot the arrow points to. That becomes relevant later. It also has a big missing spot from a bubble in the back And a crack and missing piece on one side Okay, so here's how I've begun it. First I scrubbed the resin pieces with a toothbrush in very hot water and dish liquid. There was a nasty waxy substance under the hull which I assume is mold release. Once cleaned, the bottoms of the pieces were really shiny, which seemed like it would cause a problem with the epoxy adhering. But sanding resin is problematic. Its dust is very fine and lightweight and highly toxic. Bad stuff to breathe. So I sanded them underwater, with a few drops of dish liquid add to break the surface tension so the dust wouldn't float on the water. Resin really wants to float. Sanding on the cabin exposed a greasy, waxy white substance where that little splodge was, something like a white oil pastel, and kind of gross. Scraping it out exposed more of it within the resin and lost a few flakes of the surface. It can be seen, rather big in this picture of the ship as it is at present. And here's a side view.
  17. I spotted this set and got it originally for the woman in the slinky circa. 1930 gown, not yet realizing that it had two other great figures as well. RAFM sells three-packs of adventurers for "Call of Cthulhu" showing a progression: first the person in his or her civilian life, then out on the hunt for otherworldly horrors, then gone mad with the horror. They are kind of mixed in quality, but have a certain charm. I did not paint these as a progression of one character, but as three separate women: A society dame, a sporty modern young woman from the Indian Raj, and a madwoman out on the moors -- or tidal flats of New England, anyway. There are lots of fun details with these three. I tried to paint the madwoman's slip as transparent. It's eau-de-nil, an extremely fashionable color in the 1920s. Her feet and arms are supposed to look a little grubby. I added gloves to the society lady since no lady would be out barehanded at the time (her furs really should be a wrap around the back, not be two separate pieces; I think the artist did not have a visual reference for her back). And the sportswoman's boot is resting on a block carved with the most wonderful tentacled thing, although I did not paint it as clearly as I would like. The bases of the society woman and the madwoman were a little small for stability, so I glued them to pennies. I didn't do anything fancy with the society woman's base, but I added painted foliage and rocks to the madwoman's. The madwoman's base can be seen from above in this post: http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/49565-i-hate-to-base-so-i-painted-them-instead/
  18. Hmm, I was wondering just how many posts that Pingo and Buglips are mentioned in before they actually post in it?
  19. So, I continue to plug along, trying new things. I think this is my sixth mini up here, if you count the group of Astral Reavers as three. I was trying for fire effects and deep shadows. Not sure how successful I was, although it looks nice on the table. I find that I really, really, hate to base. The thought of tweezing tiny clumps of green hairs into glue to make grass fills me with dread. But I can paint. So far I have just been painting my bases, which in this case is a one-inch fender washer lightly sanded for grip.
  20. So, a modern urban fantasy figure. Hasslefree describes HFA021 Dionne(b) as a vampire werewolf hunter, so I figured I'd paint her skin pretty bloodless. The trench coat and cat suit are my first attempt at monochrome painting, and the base is my first attempt to paint something like asphalt. I like Hasslefree's minis, although the eyes on the whole are awfully small. I painted hers way bigger than the eye sockets, although I can see how painting them as sculpted would make the face look more realistic and rather menacing. Edited to add tags
  21. Here's one more of the astral reaver figures (see http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/48284-02765-astral-reavers-3/ ), this one a monk which I have painted up as a Githzerai for D&D.
  22. This is my first ever post in Show Off. When I came back to the hobby last August after a 20-year hiatus, I promptly painted up some minis and was appalled at my level of incompetence. I've been a little gun shy since, dispensing plenty of artistic advice but not really putting my money where my mouth is. Anyway, after absorbing a lot of good advice from y'all and half-finishing several figures (I will get back to the Bones Ogre, buglips, honest.), I finally have finished some, bases and all. These are Reaper's set of 02765: Astral Reavers, which I have painted up as Githyanki for a Dungeons and Dragons campaign I'm currently playing in. Feedback would be most appreciated.
  23. Spinward Bound's thread, http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/47632-wood-elves/?hl=%2Bthunderbolt+%2Bmountain , alerted me to the excellent Thunderbolt Mountain Miniatures, sculpted by Tom Meier, legendary founder of Ral Partha. These are jaw droppingly beautiful (if a little small by modern standards). I have started working on the Wood Elf Lord and Lady in Traveling Clothes. My usual method is to prime the minis with white acrylic paint, then wash with thinned down burnt umber to be able to see the details. On the male figure (on the right), his entire outfit except for his boots and cape are still on the umber wash. They are really tiny, especially their faces. Here's the lady elf next to Reaper 03566 (also a WiP) for comparison: And here are close ups of those tiny, tiny faces:
  24. Yes, this is the repository for all things culinary. We've fired off recipes, we've traded family secrets (well, not all of them) and mentioned our favorite cooking shows. So here it is, fire them keyboards up and give us all things food-related! --lstormhammer, summoning up the Iron Chefs!
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