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Found 324 results

  1. I will be making individual WIP threads when I can get organized enough, but I just wanted to share these faces I painted yesterday because they are the first things I have painted since last November (uggh, Beekeepers topics ...) and they made me happy. They are for a single game, some PCs and some NPCs.
  2. Inspired by this post by Darsc Zacal, I'm starting a new game, "What Mini Am I Anyway?" Anyone can participate. The idea seems to be to see if you can identify a miniature from its silhouette and possibly some clues. Thematic groups are not required, but can add to the fun. This is the image that spurred the idea: Clues: This is a party of PCs in a game loosely (very loosely) based on White Wolf's World of Darkness. Two figures are from Reaper; I mentioned the sources of two of the other figures on these forums last month. One figure has been modified by the removal of a weapon. Players are encouraged to identify the figures by company, name (if any) and SKU number (if any). Prizes are, um, the respect of your awesome detectoring skills and "Likes".
  3. Here's something I have been meaning to do for a while, since apparently I have had Tom Meier's Thunderbolt Mountain pack of three giant wolves (Thunderbolt Mountain #8560) and RAFM's three dire wolves so long I can't even remember when I got them or how on earth I got an RAFM product I can't seem to find mention of on the internet. I also nabbed a set of Reaper's #02830 Wolf Pack, which contains three smaller wolves, still impressively sized next to humans. Here they are, cleaned and glued to bases (all nine wolves were more prone to tipping over sideways than I like). Reaper, on one-inch fender washers: Thunderbolt Mountain, on 1.25-inch fender washers: RAFM, on 1.25-inch fender washers: And here they are together for a size comparison, from left to right: A Reaper wolf from the set, the Bones wolf from the Familiar Set #77176, Reaper's Willow Greenivy #03682, a Tom Meier giant wolf and an RAFM dire wolf. I would say the Reaper wolves are the most classically wolf-shaped. They are a bit large for wolves (see the picture above for scale). They are realistic and look well posed for various purposes. The two larger sets of wolves are almost the size of small ponies and look like they are begging for goblin riders. The Thunderbolt Mountain giant wolves have the elegant long, thin legs Tom Meier gives a lot of his creatures (I have also seen some astonishingly elegant wolfhounds and impossibly graceful insect-like horses from his hand). Here they look maybe almost a little too long and thin, but they are certainly beautifully sculpted, as are the ranks of fur sliding along the animals' forms. Their poses are realistic and expressive. The RAFM dire wolves, as large as the Thunderbolt Mountain ones, are a lot more cartoony. Their faces are kind of pushed-in and piggy and their anatomy doesn't make as much sense. They move oddly, although melodramatically. They definitely have a mood of menace to them. Something was a little off with the casting of the Thunderbolt Mountain wolves. Two of them had little pits along their spines, as though there were just not quite enough pewter in the mold or something. I filled them in with epoxy and tried to smooth it out to match the surface. At the moment the figures are glued but not yet primed. When I paint these, I am thinking of painting them mostly as realistic grey wolves, white arctic wolves, and perhaps some black wolves.
  4. Whoops. I just dropped and lost my most useful-sized drill bit, the one that is exactly right for standard paper clips. What size is that, please? I should like to order a replacement. Or even better, a pack of replacements.
  5. This is something I've been thinking about for a friend's character. I include for posterity most of the discussion I had about it on the current Randomness thread: In the end I did a bit of gentle shaving with a fresh X-Acto blade, then filed the rest of the way. (I don't presently have Greenstuff, nor have I used it before.) This is what my copy of Aislinn looked like unmodified: And this is what Aislinn looks like now that I've tried a bit of filing. The filed areas are much shinier than the rest of the figure which seems to make them look rounder than they really are. Possibly they are not yet plausible pectoral muscles, but I'm hoping to help the effect with paint.
  6. Just checking. I am soon to assemble my first small-scale multipart resin miniatures, the sort with a number of possibly fiddly bits (Eyeballing them quickly, it looks like things like arms were fairly well-designed, with integral pin/pegs and corresponding shoulder holes already provided). I have assembled great slabs o' resin before, but this is the first delicate resin I've had to glue. On the whole I favor epoxy as glue, but would cyanoacrylate glue be a better choice for little minis? Any tips? The figures are more or less Egyptian-style cat people ("The Republic of Khaliman") from a French skirmish game called "Alkemy", if that makes a difference. Lots of thin little tails and arms.
  7. Can I ask people's considered opinions about the history reference books from Osprey Publishing? I had been vaguely aware of them Wherever Games Are SoldTM. One or two have fallen into my lap and proven useful. But I have heard mixed things about them. Some, I hear, are more reliable than others. And I have heard a few rumors that academia doesn't exactly smile on them or those who write for them. I haven't heard anything about those who illustrate for them, but I have an interest in that too. Since the InternetTM can be unreliable in these things, I thought I'd ask people who stand a better chance of having some experience.
  8. There has been some talk on the boards of people's costumes, the wearing of them and how they change things and what people are working on. So I'd like to throw open the question, What is your costume? It can be any approach. Are you working on one now? Are you a fan who appreciates them but doesn't make them? Do you have a favorite costume? Do you have favorite memories of one? Do you like realism, or abstraction, history, sci fi, or fantasy? Does costuming connect to your gaming or other hobbies? When and where do you wear costumes? Are you making something for another person? Or for a doll maybe? What's your favorite one you've seen? What would you make if you had the materials and time? *** I'll start. I have a reproduction late-eighteenth century dress in a big floral print in shades of red and blue on white, complete with undergarments, big pockets, mitts, a ruffled cap, and cocked hat that I had been wearing to our neighborhood's annual Fourth of July parade. But I've been feeling weirder about it in the last few years since late eighteenth century dress has become political in a direction I am not. So I've found myself turning towards the struggles of the Suffragists a century ago. I've been reading old mail order catalogues from the First World War and checking out the eminently practical suits women wore at the time -- big pockets everywhere! At this point I have plans for nearly everything except a suit. I have undergear and petticoats, a blouse, nearly acceptable shoes, hats to be modified, a good pattern for spats, and a pageant-style banner edged with green and purple ribbon* ready to be painted front and back with "Votes for Women". At this point it would be nice to make a historically accurate suit, but looking at what I have, I think it would be a fairly convincing impression with any reasonably matched jacket and calf-length skirt. *Those are the colors of the English suffragists, not the US ones, but I'm okay with that.
  9. Forumites may remember I painted this more than a year ago. Which I did, and then I, errr forgot to take finished pictures and post them. Sorry. I'm fixing that. This is Reaper's Bones kraken, #77291, which I believe was once offered in a resin-metal combo but is now sold in the much lighter and less fragile (and less expensive) Bonesium. When I put one together for a friend, I noted that the front end would make a pretty good carnivorous plant, especially when tucked into a lotus flower-shaped candleholder we have. It also seemed a pretty good evocation of the Sarlacc in "The Return of the Jedi". So when I put my own together, I left the body and the front end separate, both for ease of storage and for versatility of use. (I never did figure out how to put the tentacles on, though. I tried to follow the store image in both the ones I put together and they still both came out different.) I also love this model because it comes with a wonderfully elaborate base, the prow of a wrecked ship. We have been using that as scenery. Some of the creature has been painted with interference paint, which is either near-transparent or luminously glowing iridescent color depending on the angle of light and viewing. I've tried to include pictures to show the change. First are photos with a white background, to show the model clearly (I went a little overboard with underwater effects later). A few have Dark Sword Miniatures' mermaid warrior, DSM 1197, to show the scale of the model. This creature is BIG. Dark Sword Miniatures' mermaid warrior, DSM 1197, included to show the scale of the model. Very, very old WIP thread here.
  10. Been meaning to do this for ages. My devices -- tablet and phone -- have never been able to access the formatting menu that shows up on this site on desktop computers. So this is a resource of smilies to cut and paste for this forum, for when I'm posting on the phone or iPad and can't remember the dang code for that one smiley. They are divided between posts because the number of smilies per post is regulated.
  11. A wee bit late, here is a visual roundup of the miniatures I painted in the 2016 calendar year. I got off to a rapid start by attacking my Shelf of Shame in January, finishing 39 half-started figures by the end of the month: The whole Scooby Gang, female magicians and pirates, a small squad of driders, a few good monsters, some utterly enchanting Tom Meier elves, and some useful fantasy, modern, and sci fi characters. Things slowed down considerably after that, but I got some good work done in several pulses. Chaoswolf's lovely Box O' Goodwill project dropped some old school lead in my lap, and I enjoyed painting those sometimes chunky, sometimes elfin vintage figures. Summer brought some useful dungeon wall and floor terrain, which I hoped could be used for figure photography as well as gameplay. Some Doctor Who miniatures new and old were next, and the year's painting finished up with some cowboys converted to Githyanki and one magnificent and three slightly ridiculous vampires.
  12. http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/50425-randomness-x-glitter-wolves-and-mighty-thews/page-694#entry1467811 That was my last post here. It's been a time, but I'm back now. How are you all? I missed you. There's so much catching up to do. I left the boards That Night, as soon as it was obvious what had happened. The news was hard, and some of the conversations here leading up to the event had already been too painful. After I went silent some forumites PMed me to ask if all was well, and I returned to the boards a few days later to PM back that I was taking a break for a bit. At that time I took a look at the Beekeeper threads and found them difficult to bear. I felt I couldn't control my emotions, so I kept away to avoid being rude and impulsive around friends and inflaming things further. It hurt to leave, but I needed time to work through and come to terms with what happened. I have kept busy. We attended a science fiction convention. I taught art and practiced my knitting. I read Wollstonecraft and MLK and made donations to progressive causes and contacted elected representatives. The interior work under our new roof was finally finished and we started moving furniture and books back up there. I had surgery. The holidays happened, and two birthdays. We traveled out of state and a festive time was had. I missed you, did I mention that? So, how have you all been? Are you well? What news? What changes? What hobby-related goodness?
  13. These are three classic tiny Old School vampires, originally from Grenadier, now from Mirliton. Two of them I had when I was a child. The Mirliton set is called "NM002 Vampires". The Grenadier vampires were found in two sets: all three in "606 Vicious Vampires" and two of them in "2014 Folklore Creatures of the Night". I think I must have had the second set because the third vampire, the one in the "Aha! Argh" pose, is unfamiliar to me and it was not in that set. The female vampire is tiny. She is so small I was a little uncomfortable with the implications. My husband suggested she be a hobbit (or gnome) vampire and hey, problem solved. WIP thread here.
  14. This is Reaper's 03681: Nazera Bloodraven, Vampire. I love her sculptural forms. Whichever way she is turned, there is some interesting movement going on. Bobby Jackson did a lovely job sculpting her. I used iridescent interference blues and violets on her armor. I am thinking about discussing how I paint reds. WIP thread here.
  15. Once upon a time there was the first Bones Kickstarter, and one of the figures, Ellen Stone, came out of the mold somewhat lacking in the nose department, and people said, "What can you do with a noseless cowgirl?" and someone (It may even have been me) said, "Paint her up as an alien." Somewhat later I was musing over the Githyanki (who seem to keep cropping up in games I'm involved in) while sorting through my Bones minis looking for inspiration (as you do). In my bag of cowboys (Yes, I sort my Bones minis by theme), I ran across the old Ellen Stone figure, as well as a man's figure which, I realized upon close inspection, seemed to have a skull-like face, almost zombie-like, certainly lacking a nose. And something clicked and I thought "Oooh, yuss." Now, I don't absolutely know for certain that I ever will have a use for a couple of Githyanki desperadoes, and yet, here they are. First is the Bones Ellen Stone, SKU 80003. WIP thread here.
  16. These are two official, licensed Doctor Who figures from Black Tree Design: DW405, Zygon, and DW424, Zygon advancing. The Zygons are sneaky shapeshifting aliens who sometimes make an uneasy alliance with humans. In classic old Doctor Who they are mucky brown-beige things. In New Who they are more purply and speckled, and not always evil (although they look it). All of Black Tree Design's line is from Old Who. These are very much old-fashioned stuntmen-in-rubber-suits aliens. Nevertheless, I painted these up more in keeping with the New Who colors because I think they are prettier. The paint job is pretty simple, and I would have called it a speed paint, except it was four months between when I started and finished them. WIP thread here.
  17. These are a group of vampires I am painting up for Halloween. They include the Reaper Bones figures 77282: Vampire and 77283: Necromancer (painted up as a vampire, because why not), and the old classic Grenadier Set 606 "Vicious Vampires", now sold by Mirliton Miniatures in Italy (I had that set when I was a child, but for some reason I only remember the swoopy-caped male and the little female; the male in the "flasher" pose I remember not at all). The Bones figures are primed with a wash of Reaper's "Brown Liner", the Grenadier ones with a priming of Titanium White and a wash of Burnt Umber, both Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. The Grenadier female vampire is rather uncomfortably tiny, something I dealt with (you'll see).
  18. This is one of a pot-luck batch of modern adventurer women figures I got from RAFM, a real mixed bag. Some of them are terrific, some ... kind of goofy. This one seems to fall a bit closer to the goofy end. She is in a pose my martial arts friend called "Kill Me Now", and her face is rather unfortunately flattened front-to-back. I figured I'd paint her up quickly tabletop style for use as a mook or opponent. I did get a little bored painting her just plain, though, so I gave her Goth-Egyptian makeup.
  19. This is an index thread for figures painted as Drow or dark elves which did not start out as official Drow figures. I thought people might like links to find figures which work well converted to dark elves, thus this index thread. It's not comprehensive, just some I've found. Feel free to add links if you find other figures which have been painted up as Drow. (I included pictures so it would be easier to see them and see if there are duplicates, but don't feel obliged.)
  20. This is one of Crooked Dice's many classic British television homages. Crooked Dice calls him "Hugo Solomon (New Version)", but he is pretty blatantly the actor Jon Pertwee, who played the third incarnation of the Doctor in "Doctor Who" from 1970-1974 (with a return guest appearance in 1983). Whoever the sculptor is captured an amazingly close likeness. I painted up the figure, however, not as the Doctor but as a weapon-shunning magical-academic type for Shadowrun, the cyberpunk game. Although I was trying to paint the figure as not-the-Doctor, between the player's clothing color choices and the highly accurate portrait sculpture it totally looks like him. Well, with rather darker hair and blue-violet iridescence in his hair and on his cloak. Somehow it just seems to make him look more like the Doctor. WIP thread here.
  21. These are three different miniatures representing Jon Pertwee's Doctor from "Doctor Who". Pertwee played the third incarnation of the Doctor from 1970-1974, with a guest return in 1983. So there's a cute story here. My husband is playing a sort of an academic in a Shadowrun game, someone a little flamboyant but not into weaponry or the usual Shadowrun visual tropes. I mentioned that the Doctor would be a pretty good proxy for that sort of thing, and he found me Crooked Dice's unofficial (but a very good likeness of) Jon-Pertwee-as-the-Doctor figure (as well as a good number of other Crooked Dice figures as a gift). The character won't be painted up quite like the Doctor (although as it is turning out the resemblance is pretty strong). So to satisfy my slightly pedantic interest in having a figure of one of my earliest favorite Doctors to go with my Reaper Bones police box, and also to have a couple of figures to test things on, I pulled out two Black Tree Design miniatures of the third Doctor that I bought last year. So I have here three completely different miniatures of the third Doctor: a modern 28mm unofficial, fairly realistic and dynamic one, and two 25mm licensed and official but somewhat cartoony and more static Old School ones. Here they are based, primed, and washed with Burnt Umber to bring out the details. The faces are only roughed in, but I think this might be the only picture I took of them all together where you can see the wibbly-wobbly scales. I very quickly fixed up the faces. I think an argument could be made for the Doctor wearing gloves, but I prefer bare skin for his hands. I am trying to give the Shadowrun not-Doctor darker hair. I painted darker hair on the other two too, because I've found it makes a more realistic-looking undercoat for grey hair. I lightly brushed a little light brown over the Shadowrun not-Doctor's hair and mixed up a transparent cold not-quite-black from Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Sienna and washed it over the parts of his outfit which will be black. I find I prefer blacks to be made from multiple layers of dark transparent colors rather than solid opaque layers of a single color. So there will be more colors added to this clothing.
  22. So, I started these a while ago as a kind of a giggle. This is kind of a catch-up thread, as I am pretty far along with them. I had been feeling the need for more Githyanki / Githzerai figures. Anyhow, I had the abortive Ellen Stone, Cowgirl figure (link is to the metal version) from the first Bones Kickstarter, the one that never made it to retail because she hasn't got a nose. Someone (it may have been me, if anyone feels like digging through the old posts) suggested painting the bodged Bones version up as an alien. Then I noticed this guy from, I think, Bones II, 91001: Stone from the "Savage Worlds" line, who looks like a sort of zombie-ish revenant cowboy with a gaunt build and a skull-like, noseless face. And it all clicked together. My normal prep for Bones figures these days is mild flash removal and a wash of dilute Reaper Brown Liner. I don't have any pix of the figures at that early stage, but here they are with a thin layer of pale banana yellow on their skin (the male figure appears to have gloves, but I'm going with bare hands anyway to emphasize his alienness). I mixed it from my favorite Golden matte fluid acrylics in Yellow Oxide and Titanium White. The point of this pale layer is to give an undertone to the skin so that one is not dealing with a single flat color. After the initial layer I rinsed over the skin with a very fine wash of a more orange tone mixed from Hansa Yellow Opaque (a very bright lemon yellow) and Golden heavy body Pyrrole Orange. Then I started building up the shapes and contours of the skin with various subtle golden browns, mostly mixed from Burnt Umber, Burnt Sienna, Yellow Oxide, and Titanium White, and add more bright yellows based on Hansa Yellow Opaque. This is where you can start to see the shapes of their faces and they start looking a little less awful.
  23. I LOVE this figure! This is Kate Stewart, daughter of Brigadier Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, the long-time character on "Doctor Who" played by the late Nicholas Courtney. Played by Jemma Redgrave, she is the head of scientific research in UNIT. (Crooked Dice is one of those places that plays coy with minis, so they call her "Department X Cuckoo") I love this figure because I love the character, but also because it is a terrific mini of a middle-aged woman of authority, suitable for a prime minister, president, or other important female-type person with dignity. She reminds me of some of my older relatives and certain executive and presidential women I have met. I did not take pictures of my basic prep: gluing the mini to a base (I am dissatisfied with my gluing so far but I think I have an idea how to improve it in future), priming thinly with Titanium White, and washing with Burnt Umber. I was so excited to get started on her I painted her face and hair straight away. This is a new approach to blonde hair for me. I mixed quite a dull color from Raw Sienna, Burnt Umber, and Titanium White, and it seems to have avoided the brassy look some of my blonde hair has had. I also have been noticing, looking at people, that you rarely see such a made-up eye with dark liner all around as is often painted on minis. Watching the actress, who has very dark eyes, I noticed that she had quite a dark line of lashes above her eye, but almost invisible below. So I am trying that as a look.
  24. Pingo

    Mid Year Roundup

    We just passed the halfway point of 2016, so I'm posting a quick roundup of what I have painted so far this year. I started the year with my Conga Line of Doom, clearing out some shelves of shame. Finished minis include: Reaper's Racquel Blackrose, Buccanneer, a Hasslefree Japanese woman assassin, a couple of Reaper's great old Sandra Garrity female magic users: Mishka the Mystic and Katarina the Invoker, an Egyptian-style flame sorcerer, both of whom I painted as somewhat older women, Hasslefree's not-Willow-from-"Buffy", Hasslefree's entire Scooby Gang, a great big not-Lolth (turned around for nudity but the reflections left in because pretty) and Drider swordsmen and archers. Reaper's Professor Laura Pringle (and skeleton), "Karla, Anime Heroine", a modern pewter cast of an old Ral Partha Shadowrun tribute to David Bowie, a sea hag, an ogre, Rex, Dark Future Hero, four exquisite Tom Meier elves from Thunderbolt Mountain, Reaper's Kallaguk, Troll King, Vandora Waverunner, Rosie, Chronotechnician, and Malifaux' remarkable Whiskey (barrel) Golem. Three modern pewter casts of old Ral Partha Shadowrun figures, and some Reaper women old and new: "Sheila Valentine, Archeologist", Sascha Dubois, Time Chaser, Almah, Merchant Princess, Julie Guthrie's lovely Lyrie Akenja, scroll wizard, a beautiful old Dennis Mize bard, and Julie Guthrie's delightful little Valloa, elf thief. Some great old Old School lead, including the Cleric Turning, the Paladin, the Ranger, and the Bard from the classic 1980 Dungeon Explorers #5001 set, a Ral Partha male magic user with staff and crystal ball, a 1986 Grenadier dwarf sculpted by Andrew Chernak, two Grenadier goblins from the classic 1980 Monster set #5002 (painted orange, the classic old goblin color), and a circa. 1992 Metal Magic witch with cat. Some more Old School figures: a lead Ral Partha stage two of the Three-Stage Elf Thief set, a modern pewter casting of an old RAFM female ranger #3903, an old lead Mark Copplestone armored male figher with mace from the Grenadier set #1414 "Fighting Man Champions" from about 1990, a terribly crude old lead evil wizard from Heritage Models from about 1980 or even earlier, a rare early Bob Ridolfi lead ninja from about 1990, a modern pewter casting of a wonderful and very small old Ral Partha thief, another modern pewter casting of Ral Partha's Ciera, Swordmistress, and four elegant wolfhounds from Tom Meier's Thunderbolt Mountain. I seem to have missed Eregris Darkfathom and the Tiik Baron, which I will have to add before the year-end roundup.
  25. My husband gave me some birthday minis from Crooked Dice, which specializes in British TV and movie homages. This is a set (also available individually) of the "Doctor Who" characters Madame Vastra, a Silurian (reptile) warrior, Jenny, her human wife, and Strax, her Sontaran (sort of a potato-head alien) butler. Pix here: http://www.doctorwhotv.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/doctor-who-the-snowmen-christmas-pics-4.jpg https://whopix.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/doctor-capaldi-and-the-paternoster-gang.jpg http://pa1.narvii.com/5704/791b803116d02377cad782133ef2dae592fb2bd2_hq.gif It's ... a very silly show, and I adore it. I don't think these are official miniatures. They are called "Time Lost Investigators" in Crooked Dice's catalogue. Madame Vastra has an alternate head of a Victorian human woman if you're looking for a Victorian lady wielding a katana, and Strax has an alternate head of a bulldoggish butler with big sideburns, if you're looking for a solid, somewhat short butler. I did my usual prep on these: Remove flash, epoxy to bases, prime white, wash with Burnt Umber. Then I began painting. I did fairly complete jobs of Strax and Jenny's faces. Madame Vastra's head is only blocked in. I mixed this green out of Hansa Yellow, a bright lemon yellow, and a tiny dab of Carbon Black; it's one of my favorite unexpected green recipes. Here's a shot of the group together. Jenny looks a little tall, but maybe it's because Madame Vastra is lunging.
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