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  1. Coral Golem for my local paint club entry. I wanted to do something different, It seems the norm to paint everything in bright colors do I wanted to simulate all the coral being dead.
  2. I already finished terrain for Q2. I had started the Strumpet. Categories I’m working on: Large Group: Townsfolk Strumpet Large Figure: Cave Spider Theme April Showers: Deep Dweller with an acrylic resin on part of the base to look wet. Pop Up: 3 townsfolk Pop Up: Gothic Ritual: Torture equipment with blood spatter. Seasonal: Petey for Deep Dish Pizza Day Heavy Mod: Tree of Despair victim: want to reposition head, ropes, spread legs, gouge out middle and sculpt intestines to look like his torturers eviscerated him.
  3. This is s figure that I painted during a speed painting class at Reapercon a couple years ago. I decided to go back and clean up a couple things that I think could have been a little better. I know that's not quite the idea of speed painting, but I brought him to my tabletop standard, so I'm happy with him now.
  4. Havn't done much painting this past month, mainly been doing spring cleaning which wore me out. but did manage to get this done in between naps, lol. Love and watched the way Anne Forster did hers on reaper pro tips (twitch) and had to paint it, of course even thou wish I could of copy her skin tone that just wouldn't be fair, so I did my own spin on it.
  5. Hello All, I completed this "Gutrags", Stitch Golem miniature today. Made it a bit dirty and worn.
  6. The mischievous horde is on its way! This is 77444, Goblin Warrior with greatsword sculpted by Bobby Jackson. That be a scimitar I'd say. The base is 20mm.
  7. More minis from my Shelf of Shame Long-Term, Partially-Completed Backlog: A trio of kobolds from one of the Reaper Bones kickstarters! These are some of the tiniest minis I've painted. Even so, it took about 2 long evenings to complete them. I did lots of practice of NMM steel and gold. I'm now of the opinion that NMM works better than metallics for small minis. The clothing was originally red, but I found it was too close to the orange of the skin color and just blended together from about 2 feet away, so they got repainted to a color/tone that was more distinct. I prefer that my kobolds be weird dog/lizard hybrid creatures, so they all got black noses. It looks good on these! That brings the total minis I've painted this year to 19! (With another one in the wings.)
  8. Hello All, Here is a "Dust King and Crypt" miniature set I completed a few weeks ago. Thank you for looking.
  9. Good day everyone, here's 77444, Goblin warrior with spear sculpted by Bobby Jackson. Since these goblins are sold with duplicates, I will convert the others by swapping their weapons. I will also paint the goblin command, shaman and leader.
  10. Hello All, Here is a Dwarf Butcher 77460 that I painted up a couple months ago. Thank you for looking.
  11. Hey everyone, the madness continues. Here's the 77445, Goblin skirmisher with shortbow sculpted by Bobby Jackson.
  12. Hey everyone, the tribe is still growing. Here's 77349, Goblin Shaman with spider familiar sculpted by Ben Siens.
  13. A few weeks ago I made a bit of a cheeky post where "Lassie" tried to get some help for poor Timmy (who had, quite unsurprisingly, fallen down a well). Well, the Thing in the Well wasn't quite finished at the time. That has since been rectified. I present to you: The Thing in the Well/The Well of Doom! The well was painted up with my favorite craft paint combo: Delta Ceramcoat Chocolate Cherry, Burnt Sienna, and Terra Cotta. Truly great stuff! And it's not grey! I honestly think I'm going to use that trio for most of my stone scenery. I left the fluid unattached and painted the inside of the well with a couple shades of dark blue (I no longer remember which ones). But I'm not sure whether or not I'll ever take the brain out of the well, so it was just a whim and not anything really planned. The first part of the beastie I tackled was the well "water." I knew I wasn't going to paint it up like blue water. I was hoping to create a rather unnatural vibe. I thought about green, but ended up using the NMM Gold triad. I don't know if I got the shading right, as I was trying to make the fluid darker where it would be thicker/deeper and paler near the edges and peaks. The brain was next. I used the Vampiric Skin triad for the grey matter. The veins/arteries along the surface were originally going to be red...and then I remembered that squid blood isn't red. Squid blood is blue. So out went the red (not for the only time this project). I used Nightmare Black to serve as a base for Ritterlich Blue and Brilliant Blue topped off the highlights. You can't see the "cerebellum," but I used Imperial Purple, Amethyst Purple, and Spectral White to paint it up. I was on a "cool" colors kick. And then the tentacles. Ugh. Not "ick," "ugh." My original, scatter-brained plan was to try to emulate the humboldt squid. Those rather nasty pieces of work pulse red when they're agitated. So I painted the backs of all the tentacles red. Then I put the fluid in the well and started dry-fitting the tentacles. It didn't work. None of it. Not the shade of red and not the fit of the tentacles. I ended up pinning four of the tentacles to the fluid base. There just didn't seem to be enough "plug" on them to properly sit in the base and I didn't want to drown the thing in glue. One of those pins is rather questionable, though, but it's all holding for now. The mold lines are another issue. I should have checked more carefully before I started, but these aren't for much beyond my own grins and giggles. I can forgive a few mold lines. After getting the tentacles nice and attached, I pondered for a bit and ended up choosing the Twilight Colors triad (another favorite) for the backs. I chose the Rosy Flesh triad for the underside of the tentacles, and the Bone Colors Triad for the hooks on the suckers. And that's about it. Thanks for stopping by!
  14. So, with my shelf of shame finally cleared I thought I would introduce the remaining duelist to some of my friends. I don't have many unpainted dwarves left thus including the three Dwarven Bones (having primed six)...Ugh I know Bones right. (One reason I don't like bones is that I feel I have to try and paint them better because of the obscure crispness of the mold.) Anyways when I primed them told myself I don't want to see no "Orange Hair" and the next thing I know is I'm varnishing, no, what, wait, OMG orange hair!
  15. To celebrate the ongoing Reaper Miniatures: Bones 6 Kickstarter, I decided to paint nothing but Bones while it runs. Here are the current results (though there's a lot more that got a few colors and were set aside) The Catoblepas: The Hydra: The Greater Basilisk: Cockatrices: The Plague Twins: Patchwork Golems: 'Folk Wizards: Feral Vampire: KOBZAR SOLOVEIKO, NIGHTINGALE BARD Shroomie The Bones 6 Promo Goblin:
  16. So a few nights ago me and the wife were watching some House of Cards and in the last episode we saw the main character shows a huge table he's been working on with some Civil War miniatures on it and that got me thinking how often and where have I seen miniatures on TV or in the movies. The ones that come to mind are: House of Cards, mentioned above 40 Year Old Virgin, where we get a few shots of Carrell painting some miniatures under his magnifying lense. On HGTV, there was a Househunters International, where they are looking for a place in Sweden and the guy that gets the house also has some kind of cellar outside in the common garden where he's got a collection of Warhammer miniatures. On the Olympics in the last few weeks, there was the one Canadian skier (don't remember his name) who has a brother with cerebral palsy and in the little human interest story, they mentioned the brother was an artist, and they cut away to him painting some miniatures as well as a big canvas with some flowers on it. I saw some article somewhere too, don't even remember what magazine, of some football player who likes to paint miniatures as well. Any other things that come to mind to anybody else?
  17. Scale 75 Instant Colours over black and white sketch.
  18. "Opps", the owner of the shop said, "didn't I mention you have to kill them first." The two marsh trolls I just recently finished; the cave troll was from one of the quarterly contests thou I never posted his pics afterwards. Was hard to get a good pic of their faces as both are looking down and they are so large thus wasn't able to crop my strip at the top from advice that DKS had given me when taking pics from my old camera.
  19. I luv the look of this troll but wish I wasn't so cheap and gotten the metal and resin version, he belongs in bones black. His legs are too skinny for regular bones which makes him to continuous droop as he is too top heavy. I had to pin and then glue his left foot flat with the base and raise the front of the base like 20 degrees to stop that effect. Well what color do u paint a troll king, well green of course?
  20. I put together a few documents related to using Bones. I've submitted these to the Craft section of the website, but as it may be a little while before Reaper has the time available to add them, Bryan suggested that I post them here. Bones - Frequently Asked Questions (this document) Bones - Preparation (mould line removal, glue, putty, etc.) Bones - The First Coat is the Difference (primer, primer alternatives, paint durability) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Bones Miniatures: Frequently Asked Questions What are Bones Miniatures? The Bones material is a polymer plastic. It is light-weight and slightly flexible, and is very durable. You can paint a Bones figure straight out of the package, and that paint job will also be pretty durable. Bones figures are as detailed as metal figures, for a much lower cost. Bones miniatures are produced with integral (built-in) bases, but it is easy to cut the miniature off of the base if you prefer to put it on something else. It is also easy to cut the figures apart to convert them into different poses or change weapons. What is the bare minimum I need to know to start painting my Bones right now! If you want background on why these are the recommendations or what other alternatives might also work, read the rest of this document, Painting Bones Miniatures: Preparation and Painting Bones Miniatures: The First Coat is the Difference. Remove Mould Lines Remove by slicing just under the mould lines with a hobby knife, in a similar motion to paring vegetable or hand-sharpening a pencil. Files work best if you file in one direction, then remove burrs by filing in the opposite direction. Reshape Bent Parts Dip the misshapen piece in boiling water for a minute or two, remove and move into desired position, then immediately hold in ice water for a few minutes. NOTE: Read additional information in this document for safety recommendations! What Glue to Use Superglue aka cyanoacrylate works best to glue Bones to itself or other materials. What Putty to Use All major brands of putty tested work with bones. (Green Stuff, Milliput, etc.) What Works as a Paint Stripper Soak figure in Simple Green Concentrated All Purpose Cleaner for 12 – 24 hours, then scrub it with an old toothbrush. Best Primer None. Start with a first coat of undiluted Reaper Master Series Paint, then paint as normal from there. This is the best choice for durability and a good painting surface. Other acrylic paints that work with miniatures should have similar results. Paint can be applied with a brush or airbrush (diluted paint seems to work with an airbrush.) Best Primer if You Want to Prime Anyway Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer in black or white, or Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium (also brush-on.) Best Spray Primer Many aerosol primers will not cure completely on Bones. Reaper forum members have reported good results with the Army Painter sprays. How to Do a Wash Directly on Bones Thin your wash with one of the following mediums and just a small amount of water if necessary: Master Series Brush-On Sealer, Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium, Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer. Can you really paint Bones miniatures straight out of the package? Absolutely! However, if you’ve ever painted metal, resin or plastic figures in the past, you may notice some differences in how the first coat of paint behaves. Paint diluted with water (even just a drop or two for a thinned base coat) may bead up and pull away from crevices. The more water you add to the paint, the more you’ll notice this effect, so water-thinned washes used directly on the Bones material don’t really work. That first coat of paint may also take a little longer to dry. Most people find that the paint applies a little better if you first wash the figure. Just scrub it with a little dish soap and a toothbrush and allow it to dry before you start to paint. Another alternative is to apply a primer or another surface preparation that works with the Bones material as the first coat. Once you get that first coat on, you can use highly thinned paint in subsequent layers and it should behave pretty much the same as on any other figure. For more information, methods to use thinned paint directly on the Bones surface, tips for quicker drying and a list of primers that do (or don’t) work with Bones, please see the Craft document Painting Bones Miniatures: The First Coat is the Difference. What kinds of paint work on Bones Miniatures? The Bones material is designed to work with Reaper’s Master Series and Master Series HD lines of paint. Internal testing and feedback from customers suggests that Bones also works well with the other major miniature paint lines, including Reaper’s discontinued Pro Paints, Vallejo Game Color, Vallejo Model Color, Privateer Press’ P3 Paints, and Games Workshop. Artists’ acrylic paint are also likely to work on Bones. However, please note that Reaper does not offer any guarantee or assurance that the Bones miniatures will work with any particular paint other than Master Series and Master Series HD. You are advised to test your preferred paint on a Bones figure to decide for yourself how well it works. If your paint does not work well on bare Bones, you can prepare the surface with a coat of Master Series paint and it will likely work over that. How do I remove the mould lines from a Bones figure? Like all miniatures, Bones figures have small mould lines as a result of the manufacturing process. You do not need to remove these to paint or use a Bones, but many people prefer to remove them for aesthetic reasons. You can remove these with the same tools you would use on a metal figure – hobby knife, files, and/or sandpaper. However, you may find that you need to use these materials in a slightly different way. Hobby knives work best if you slice under and along the mould line in a paring motion rather than scraping them along the mould line. With files and sandpaper, file in one direction perpendicular to the mould line. If you find you have burrs of material remaining, lightly file those off moving the tool in the opposite direction. How Durable is the Bones Material? Bones figures are remarkably durable, and not just in comparison to metal and resin figures. People have dropped Bones from a height of one storey, ground them underfoot, driven over them with a car, carried them loose in backpacks and pockets, and they’ve sustained no damage. The light weight of the material means drops and falls hit with much less mass behind them. The give of the material means it’s much better able to absorb impact, where a brittle material like resin will likely break. They’re not indestructible, but they can take an impressive amount of damage. We had several Bones figures out at the PAX Prime 2012 convention for people to examine and abuse. We bounced them off the floor, and invited dozens of people to step on them. One of the small kobolds with narrow diameter legs did break at one ankle on the third day. Another figure suffered a very small area of damage due to the friction generated by someone’s shoe grinding it across the floor. If Bones are so durable, is it hard to cut them up for conversions? What glue should I use? The Bones material cuts easily with a sharp hobby knife. Cuts have smooth edges and do not deform surrounding material as often happens with metal. So it is an easy matter to swap a head from one figure to another, or cut off an arm and reposition it slightly so you can customize individual figures within a unit. All it takes to glue them back together is regular superglue (cyanoacrylate). You can also use superglue to adhere Bones to metal or wood. Green Stuff and other two-part putties work well if you need to fill gaps or sculpt on additional details. Pinning is a good idea when attaching metal parts to a Bones miniature, as the added weight of the metal will otherwise make the join weaker. The plastic parts are quite stable when glued together, but pinning doesn’t hurt in plastic-to-plastic conversions, either. How durable is a painted Bones figure, though? Bones miniatures painted with Master Series and Master Series HD paint are surprisingly durable. You probably don’t want to grind one underfoot or drive over it with your car, but you’ll be amazed at what they can handle. Figures are unlikely to experience notable damage to the paint from regular handling, bumping against each other on the table, or getting knocked over, even when playing with the most ham-handed of players. My painted test figures survived being tossed unsecured in a plastic box with a bunch of unpainted Bones that was carried around two conventions (PAX Prime and Gen Con 2012). They were handled by hundreds of people and literally and repeatedly thrown onto tables from heights of several feet. They have some dings and chips, but the bulk of the paint jobs survived. The paint on these figures had not been coated with any sort of protective sealer. The durability of other brands of paint may vary. I have not done the same sort of extensive testing with other brands of paint. In my limited testing of how well other brands of paint apply to bare Bones, I did notice that Vallejo Model Color paints seemed to rub off the figure pretty easily. I did not notice that happening with the other brands I tested. (P3, Vallejo Game Color, Pro Paint, Adikolor.) Can you remove unwanted paint from a Bones figure? Sometimes painting a figure doesn’t go exactly as planned. If you would like to strip the paint from a Bones figure so you can start from scratch to paint it another way, just drop it into a dish of Simple Green Concentrated All Purpose Cleaner for 12 – 24 hours, then scrub it with an old toothbrush and it is ready to paint again. Some paint colours may leave a stain on the Bones material, but should not leave any texture or affect subsequent layers of paint. Simple Green in an eco-friendly cleaner sold in most hardware stores and some grocery stores. Brake fluid also works, though is a much more toxic material. Are Bones figures less detailed than their metal counterparts? Bones figures are bright white, which makes them hard to photograph. A number of people who have lacked confidence in the product quality based on the photographs in the online store have been pleasantly surprised by them once they can look at one in person. However, there are also a few people who feel the quality of the Bones is a little less than that of their metal counterparts. When available, Reaper’s online store includes photographs of painted versions of the figures that may give you a better idea, but looking at Bones yourself in person is really the only way to find out how you feel about them. I compared one of the smaller Bones, Dwarf Warrior 77011, against his counterpart, Fulumbar 14146, under magnification. The only real difference I noted between the two was that the texture of the chainmail loin cloth and the laces on the gloves were a tiny bit shallower on the Bones figure. You can see a comparison of a Bones and metal figure of the same sculpt painted identically in this thread on the Reaper forums: http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/47477-bathalian-bones-vs-metal-challenge/ Do Bones have sharp edges on weapons? Weapons and the like on Bones figures are cast at pretty much the same thickness as similar parts on Reaper’s metal figures. However, since Bones is a flexible plastic material, you will never be able to shave or file down an edge or a point to the same sharpness that you can achieve with a metal figure. Are the photographs of Bones figures in the online store and catalogue the same figures as the ones for sale? The online Reaper store and catalogue photographs of Bones miniatures are taken of production run figures – the same figures that Reaper packages up to sell. Can I do anything about a bent spear or sword on a Bones figure? You may find that sometimes the thinner parts on Bones, like spears and swords, will look a little bent. Or the figure might be leaning back or forward too much on its ankles. If you want to straighten those out, hold the figure with tongs or in a colander, and dip it into boiling or near boiling water for at least a minute or two. Remove it from the water, reposition the part, and immediately dunk it into a bowl of ice water for at least a minute. It should hold in the new position. If you expose the figure to heat at a later time, it may revert to its original position. For this reason, if you want to wash the figure with soap and water prior to painting, you should use cool water or wash it before you heat it to reset a warped part. Important safety notes: Please exercise caution! The Bones material may get hot when dipped in boiling water, so you should use protective gear rather than touching it with your bare fingers. The Bones material might be damaged or damage your pot if placed in direct contact with the pot surface. If you are under the age of 18, please ask your parents for permission and have them read this section before boiling Bones figures. Are Bones made in China or the United States? All Bones figures made prior to March 2013 were produced in China. In March 2013, Reaper installed the machine necessary to produce Bones in its factory in Texas, and began the process of transferring production in-house.
  21. In a post Bones IV world there are lot more translucent miniatures in circulation. You may have had the same reaction I had, where I thought they were neat, but had no idea what to do with these things. Well, today was the day I decided I was going to try a few different experiments with painting these things to see what would happen. I did try an experiment once before with some purple translucent modes from bones 3, where I put a black wash over them. I was not happy with those results. They turned out looking opaque black with purple highlights from a distance, and translucent against a light or if you looked real close. Not a strong enough effect for table play. So this time, I did a bunch of research (mostly on this forum) and was told about using a clear coat and ink to add definition and maintain translucency. Looked good in the pictures, so I thought I would try some variations on that. First thing I wanted to experiment with was testing something I read here that said something to the effect of "the clear coat actually makes them more translucent, because it changes how they reflect light" so I thought I would try a matte clear coat and a gloss clear coat and see how they compared. The following are a very light black ink wash (from the Reaper Ink triad) and then Tamiya X-22 gloss clear (on the left) and Tamiya XF86 gloss matte (on the right). These models were not very translucent to begin with, but both coats did really make them appear more clear. The gloss was very shiny, had a distinctive wet look, and makes the model look like a clear piece of hard candy. The matte coated model appears to let about the same amount of light through, but is less reflective than it was before I coated with anything. With less reflection the model looks a little less ethereal, but also less like a plastic toy. I decided that I didn't want wet looking spirits, so I decided to go with a black ink wash and the matte coat. Here are those results: Much better than my last attempt, which were only transparent when held against a light. They are still reflective, but less than out of the box. I also tried a red ink instead and it had a very striking effect of red against the blue (the colors didn't blend at all like I thought they would) but it wasn't what I was looking for, so I washed it off. Here is a comparison of a painted and unpainted model: So really, I would say not painting them at all is totally viable. I like having the details show, but if they are ghosts, maybe it is okay that it is hard to see without taking a very close look. I also did a matte coat on some crystals (no ink) and it improved the translucency greatly, though it is hard to capture in a photograph. I learned I prefer that matte coat to clear, (but both are cool). Inks work well, where standard acrylics did not last time. Clear coats do make them more clear. and they transparent models look ghostly and cool already, so painting them isn't giving you that much really, if they are only intended for table play. maybe this information will be useful to someone. I wish I could have found it all in one place when I was puzzling over what to do and what to purchase.
  22. Simple little speed paint using Citadel Nighthaunt Gloom airbrushed over a grisaille value sketch. . .
  23. This one was a quickie. Not a groundbreaking paint job, but I like him and I had fun.
  24. Finally painted him up! For some reason he did not appeal to me to paint, but once I got going I found it pleasing to bring to life!
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