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  1. I lost the thread, someone asked about browns on the colour wheel. They are very dull (desaturated, I think) oranges and yellows. And now you know.
  2. So I am getting back into painting miniatures after a long, long hiatus. In preparation for this I have been going through my paints and seeing what, if any, are still good. I used Games Workshop paints almost exclusively back then and really loved the quality, price and ease of clean up. These are all from the early to mid 90s and still seem in good shape. My question is - how does Reaper Paints compare? I'm getting the Kickstarter Bones miniatures sets and saw they have some good deals on 24 paints of what look to be pretty useful colours. I just want to know if any of the 'old timers' here have any experience with the 'classic' GW paints and the newer Reaper ones. Are the Reaper ones as good? Better? A lot better? Thanks in advance to anyone who can help a guy out!
  3. Hello folks. Ive been painting my metal minis with some inexpensive craft paints from wally world, and thats been working out wonderfully. However I am worried that this will only end poorly when my bones come in in march, as I am a proud vampire+ backer . The inexpencive paints in question are the Plaid acryllic craft paints, I've been using these because I couldnt afford to buy the reaper paints(also wife said no way those cost too much for so little paint ) I just need to know if what I have will work or not so I can work on saving up for paints that will work. Thank you all in advance.
  4. I've noticed recently that all the new figures are given a paint job. While I understand that it's more eye catching, and it may be inspiring, but I find it kind of limiting. I personally would prefer an unpainted picture when ordering models. I've actually painted over the raw pictures in photoshop to plan out my color scheme. It's been bugging me for a while, but I really caught my attention with the release of the pictures of the Red Petals Su model for Deadlands. Unless you're a long time deadlands fan like me you might not catch it, but Su is Chinese, and the picture for the model makes her a blonde. Basically, I think the paint jobs are beautiful, but I'd really like to still have the an example of the raw unfinished model that i'm going to actually get.
  5. So. I used to be a mini painter back when I was a kid. I have been playing tabletop rpgs steadily for over 30 years, but haven't done minis for the last 20. I did, however, get my art degree and became a pro artist in the meanwhile, so I know some technae. However, my understanding of mini painting is stuck at kid level, when I used acrylics but did not speak with anyone else or know the terminology or (to be honest) paint very well. Now I'm working as a beginner again, here to learn, but since I also have an art background I find myself wondering about certain aspects of mini painting. For example, why is dry brushing considered a quick and dirty method of highlighting? I understand it as a way to do some very subtle blending (on the macro scale, anyway). What would be the more careful version of painting that it is a substitute for? I also have questions about how people understand the terminology. For example, I've noticed regular use of the term "glaze," which seems to be understood as a wash of a darker color over a lighter one to increase its intensity or, especially in the case of minis, to bring out its texture. Mini painting seems to use only the wet sense of "glaze" (but then, to be fair, so do most fine artists). But "glaze" can also be used to mean dry brushing with a transparent darker color over a lighter one, which can generate some very interesting effects. I have not seen use of the counterpart to "glaze," which is "scumble." "Scumbling" is the same as "glazing," but using a lighter, semi-opaque color over a darker one. It's very good for pearly, moonlit effects and fog and atmospherics. Do people use this technique? And if so, what do they call it? I'm sure I'll think of other questions as I go along, but that's it for starters.
  6. So I'm scrolling along the paints selection, and I run across one I had never noticed before. I very much like the idea that Reaper produces a paint called "Basic Dirt." Did you guys send Bryan or Anne out to verify it?
  7. Just thought I'd post a home-made paint mixer I fabbed up. I did a commission recently that required a lot of shades of paint. Even though RMS paints are easy to shake, some of mine are getting long in the tooth (thickening) and shaking them was becoming tiresome... I was going to buy some kind of scientific lab shaker on ebay, but even the used, crappy ones were going for $40 and might come with an unexpected gift of anthrax or something... And I had a deadline to meet so shipping wasn't an option. So I made my own paint shaker out of parts I had lying around. I did some surfing and found other painters' ideas I combined into a working unit. I've made one before, but it was a cheesy thing with a weighted CD-ROM motor attached to a film canister, suspended by an o-ring. I wanted something more effective, easier to use, and able to hold multiple paints at once. I ran across someone who attached a motor to a plastic tray and hung it from rubber bands. It worked nice, but clattered the heck out of the paints in the tray. However, it gave me an idea - I figured the scientific shakers had some kind of rubber isolator to keep the shaker from transferring vibrations to the table. So here's what I came up with: All told this cost me $0, since I had all the parts on hand. But, it should cost under $20 to make depending on what parts you can scrounge or buy. WARNING - I provide this article as an example for entertainment purposes only, and take NO responsibility for anyone attempting to build a similar device. DO NOT attempt to do this unless you have a basic knowledge of mechanics or electronics. NO ONE under the age of 18 should attempt to build this. Parts list: 12v computer fan (80mm or larger and at least 200mA for max. vibration) plug-in 12v DC transformer - should match the mA rating of the fan. (I used a 14v @ 100mA, though, which worked fine - higher voltages can lessen motor life though...) protective screen or mesh for fan (don't use the chrome ones with big openings- you'll see why in the description) plastic tray ($1 for 2 @ drugstore) rubber non-slip shelf liner rubber weather-stripping insulation assorted screws 4 hollow rubber feet - sourced from a DVD player, but can be found in electronic supply houses wire crimp connectors wire cutting/crimping tool on-off switch (optional) - I didn't have one handy, so I just plug it in lead foil or similar flat weight super glue or E6000 double-sided tape rubber cement As you can see the tray was just screwed to the top part of the fan's screen with some small electronics screws. I drilled pilot holes with my pin-vise and screwed it down. I stuck the non-slip sheeting on the tray with double-sided tape. The weather-stripping foam is self-adhesive - I used enough thickness to be able to hold a bottle firmly on its side. This guarantees maximum shaking of the paint: I then prepped the fan by gluing pieces of lead foil on one blade with super glue. (The white residue is from zip-kicker.) Flat, thin pieces of lead worked best. I could shape them to the fan blade profile before gluing. I tried a flattened fishing weight first and it flew off as soon as I fired up the fan (you DID read my warning right?!?) Tiny sticker of Iron Man can be added to fan blade later if desired. A few pieces were enough to off-balance the fan so it shook when it turned - like a cell phone vibrator, but much stronger. (I used maybe a 1/4 oz worth of lead.) Next I screwed down the fan to the tray and attached the bottom screen. The screen is crucial so if lead does fly off the fan blade later it won't shoot across the room... However – the weighted side of the fan blade is pointing at the bottom of the tray, so chances are it won’t fly anywhere dangerous but into the bottom. You can add metal mesh if you feel totally paranoid but after several weeks of using this gizmo I've had no mishaps. I glued the rubber feet to the bottom screen with rubber cement. You can see here the hollow rubber will isolate the mixer from the surface it's on. Finally I cut the leads from the fan and crimped them onto the transformer's wires. (The blue wire shown in the fan close up wasn't "live" - I assume it's for speed control or something I didn't need, so I snipped it off.) Caveats – I don’t know how long the fan will last, since it wasn’t designed to spin unbalanced and push air against a solid plastic surface. Eventually the bearing will go, but it’s easy enough to get a new fan. The transformer doesn’t get hot after 5 minutes’ straight shaking so I assume I’ll never have to replace that… So how's it work? It doesn't vibrate my workbench - all the shaking goes into the paints. The tray slides over maybe a 1/2 inch when it first spins up, but then settles into a groove and won't move again. See the video for a sound level - it's much quieter than a computer fan when it's at max cooling. Quiet enough to be of no disturbance at night (my studio is next to my daughter's bedroom.) Here are some examples of paints I shook. The Vallejo red hasn’t been used for 5 years (I’m not lying! - ever since I switched to RMS paints.) 2 minutes shaking and it pours almost like new! The RMS paints were thinned perfectly in 1 minute or less, though some bottles thicken up with time (even a mixer won't fix that!) so a little distilled water may help with older bottles. As you see, the tray can hold up to 6 paints side by side, but I wouldn't add more than that or the rubber feet might compress too much from the weight. And it does a decent job of rolling dice too - though probably not fast enough for most gamers... Not bad for 30 minutes' work! ;)
  8. I just bought a half dozen miniatures from Reaper and I was excited to discover that a free dropper bottle of paint had been included with my order. That was a cool bonus. I have been examining the bottle and I used the paint on one of my models. I like it and it's great stuff. I cannot figure out what color I have been given. There was no color name on the label. My best guess is that this is Muddy Brown 09028. I got that notion from browsing the Reaper site and looking at color swatches. I was wondering if any knowledgeable person on these message boards could tell me with certainty what color I have here. Thanks very much. Here is a picture of my bottle of paint:
  9. Hello, I need a little help. I had some shelves made for my new desktop / bookcase. they came to me well primed and ready to paint. I am using a Behr Satin paint. I have successfully painted all of the shelves and the smaller desktop to my liking. But the larger 5'x3' desktop I can not get to look "even" to save my life. I have put on 7+ coats at this point trying a variety of "rolling techniques" but always there is a "trouble spot" and never in the same place. once the last coat dries I see that an area looks un-even or you can see the roll lines So when I paint it again, that area will look fine but another area will have a similar issue. I could blame the paint or the roller but they worked on the other shelves just fine. I have tried both the 'pink" rollers and the "white foam" roller types. I started with the pink, and then the white but the white actually looked worse so then I went back to the pink. Does anyone have any advice? I have posted photos of the pic issue here http://www.zangzing..../new-album-4--2 thanks in advance.
  10. I'm so excited to share this news: Game Empire Painting Tournament March 25, 2012, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 7051 Clairemont Mesa Blvd, #306 San Diego, CA 92117 858-576-1525 Cost: FREE!!!!! Prize pool includes store credit, brushes from Army Painter, cool stuff from Games Workshop, Reaper minis, and more! Basic supplies, minis, basing materials, and drinks will be free to participants. Da Roolz: Minis from any company, current or defunct, are acceptable. Mini must be primed and assembled when registered. (This rule can be bent, but will waste your precious painting time.) Primed and assembled minis will be made available in the “up to 28 mm categories”, while supplies last. Pre-painted minis not accepted for this tournament. Please register with a monitor before beginning to apply color. We will number the bottom of your mini. Use your stuff, use stuff from the supplies. It’s all good. Seasoned pros are likely to have their own supplies and should leave the communal supplies for the amateurs. We’re not sticklers, it’s just good manners. Don’t be a jerk. If you’re nasty to the other competitors, you may be asked to leave. Even young’uns are expected to have good manners. Basing: (That means adding cool stuff, like rocks and sticks to the floor of your mini.) This isn’t necessary, but highly encouraged. And it sure makes your mini look awesome… Due to their overwhelming awesomeness, Game Empire employees are not allowed to enter this contest. Too bad you rock. Categories: Young Bloods: up to and including age 14—must have ID or a guardian to verify age. No professionals. Prizes awarded to first, second, and third places. (all sizes) Pro: If you have ever been paid to paint minis, this is your category. Two size categories: a.) up to 28mm, and b.) over 28mm. Yes, Virginia, there are professionals under age 15. Get over it. They might just kick your hiney. Amateur: No professionals. Two size categories: a.) up to 28mm, and b.) over 28mm. (If you have ever been paid to paint minis, enter in the pro category. We expect you to be honest about this.) People’s Choice: All entries from other categories may be submitted. Anyone may enter. This is a special award judged by the public. Schedule Registration is all day, beginning at 10 a.m. Please register all minis and hang on to the claim ticket we give you! 4:45 p.m. All entries must be completed and ready for judging. 5 p.m. Judging begins. You need not be present to win… but your mini does! Minis will then be placed in our chess case for People’s Choice Award. This will be voted on by the public (one vote per person—duh!) over the next week (March 25-31) and tallied April 2. Winners will be announced April 2. (Yes, you can vote for your own mini. Yes, kids can vote too—it ain’t the presidency.) Our fabulous Judges: 2012 Broadside Bash Award-winning Allan Pyle Golden Demon award-winner Bob Felix. (Subject to availability, but it looks good!) Judges’ decisions are final. These guys are pros and know what they’re looking for. The judges reserve the right to move an entry into a different category if they deem it appropriate. COA Clause: Once in our care, we will take special care of your minis, but we can accept no responsibility for loss or damage to individual entries. Models are entered into the competition at the artist’s own risk. If they come alive and fly around the store, we’ll talk later. Rules lawyers should talk to Desiree about rule changes BEFORE the tournament. Suggestions about future tournaments will be given consideration. This is Desiree’s first shot at it, so give her a break. If this topic should be moved to a different forum, no prob. This was my best guess!
  11. Hey all.. I'm new to the site and new to pathfinders, I used to play DnD many years ago (man I'm getting old) Anyway I'm wondering, as I look thru all the mini's I want to buy I notice that there are a few that have options that show user painted mini's. The ones that have these extra pics are painted by some extremly talented painters. What I'm wondering is if we as reaper mini consumers could upload our own painted pieces of the mini and have it show up next to the ones that don't have any extra pics next to it, or have some kind of rotating images that show everyones art of that specific mini, of course if its from me it won't be the greatest but it would be kind of cool to see what others have painted on the same piece as you. I know about the show it off forum and love all the work there (such amazing talent here) but it would be really cool to see what others are doing with the specific mini you have sitting at your gaming table at home. Well, thanks for reading and maybe this idea already exists, if so let me know how/where to go. I look forward to meeting everyone here in the forums as the future becomes the present. Have a great day... Doug
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