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  1. So I picked up a blister of the Walls of Fire from The Complete Strategist in NYC yesterday, and took a few minutes to wash, dry, and coat them with some Tamiya Clear Paint. I did one with Clear Red, 2 with Clear Yellow.... I am wondering how much I can 'shade and high light' with these clear paints. I am thinking of using some Smoke on the tips... Anyone try this? Pics: The middle one is the one done with Clear Red... Comments Welcome! 8) George
  2. Eww, yuck. These guys would be terrible to encounter in a dungeon. The primary colors come from unthinned inks applied with a heavy hand so they start to pool. Highlights were painted with normal colors. I used yellow ink for the right-hand one, and a mix of blue and yellow for the left (I don't have green ink). The bottom side of each is painted white, which is why they are so brightly colored. Then as a final touch, hit with a heavy coat of Citadel 'ardcoat.
  3. Here we have my finished 77310: Water Weird. The plinth was worked up from a base of Peacock Green to Pure White through a succession of glazes - I was playing around with how high I could take it and have it read as stained marble. The 'gems' I left translucent and coated with Tamiya Clear Blue. The runes were picked out in Vallejo Model Air Silver, then tarnished with Black Ink. The water weird itself is three different 'strengths' of Taimiya Clear Blue. The base coat was diluted 2:1 with Tamiya Thinner. I then hit the crevices on the figure with a 1:1 dilution, and finished off the face with undiluted Tamiya Clear Blue. I really like the variation in tone this gives the figure - it's much more subtle than just throwing undiluted Tamiya Clear paint on the figure, and reads a lot more like water to me than say the ice wall or crystal golem I've done previously. The 'crest' was worked up through LED Blue to Pure White, with a Black Wash to define it. I also tidied up a few 'whoopsies' with the 2:1 dilution of Tamiya Clear Blue. The teeth are Pure White again, with Black Wash to define, and the eyes are Pure White worked up to Clear Yellow. I also tried underlighting it with a LED light source to see how it'd potentially look if I mounted one permanently. It's not too bad - the Peacock Green base coat on the plinth comes through a little, and looks kinda eldritch. This, however, is closer to how it looks in person when underlit I think I should have tried to work the runes up from a blue to the silver, perhaps as if lit from the gem above them. But still, quite pleased with how this turned out.
  4. Edited now that I'm back home... I started this mini on Friday, and tried to do a centre-out light-to-dark translucent paint job. The Badger Freak Flex tints just beaded up in an initial coat - even when adding medium it didn't help. I had nothing to get the centre yellow without going opaque which I didn't want to do at this point. I then took my Napthol Crimson (Red) Liquitex ink and added a drop to some medium and that went on fine. I forgot that Burnt Umber is very orange, and if I'd done that first I could have tried to do something interesting with the shadows in red. Oops! Attempts to highlight with that didn't do much at all. I decided to do a few quick washes with a mix of DIoxazine Purple and Prussian Blue, and got some nice shadows from that. I also daubed the eyes with a bit of Blue Flame from the KS2 paints. The next morning I took an update photo and noticed the great directional light from the window (inspiration pics below). After that I scrapped what I was doing and decided to try and paint the highlights that I saw in the photo. I used FIreball Orange HD (29806) and Gilded Yellow HD (29845) up to Gilded Yellow /True White (1:1). I'm especially happy with how the back turned out - I think that's partly because the blue/purple shadows really pushed the contrast more. I also didn't want to do half the face in bright yellow... so I didn't. This mini photographs MUCH better than it looks in hand. If you can open 2 windows to compare side-by-side, it's recommended. Linked for nudity. Front http://tinypic.com/r/rj4279/8 Back http://tinypic.com/r/2ljpces/8 Inspiration photos Front http://tinypic.com/r/i71t79/8 Back http://tinypic.com/r/vo8im1/8
  5. My first mini from the Bones Kickstarter! I just had to do this guy. It did not photograph well, I'm afraid - a hazard of the translucent Bones. For what I did - I "primed" with Reaper Brush-on Sealer and painted the pedastal normally (sorry about the horrible mold line in pic 1, I barely noticed it when trimming.) Incidentally, I plugged the hollow in the base with some air-dry clay and glued it to a washer - this gives it some nice bottom weight. The idea behind the magical writing on the pedastal was that they were glowing blue - I decided to try and simulate this with a nice gradiation from blue to white. I don't think I quite accomplished "glowing," but I do like the look regardless. The Water Weird itself was washed with thinned blue Tamiya Clear. I then used a very thin pure white to glaze some of the high points and pick out details in the face. Some areas I darkened with more Tamiya Blue Clear. I then seal-coated with Pledge and painted the pedastal with more Reaper Brush on sealer to kill the gloss. I wanted to leave the elemental glossy - this also led to issues with the photos. As usual for me, the pictures are pretty darn big - feel free to click. Without further ado:
  6. I bought Tamiya clear yellow, green and orange and played around with the female bones fire elemental (77083) and the bones grave wraith (77097). The yellow/orange hardly shows at all on the red bones, but the green Tamiya clear turned out ok on the green wraith. Fire Elemental linked due to nudity: http://www.coolminiornot.com/369634?browseid=10757476 Edited to add SKU to tags.
  7. So, I'm kinda stuck on this one. I followed the first several steps I did for my nightspectre. Where I'm stuck is what to do for the skin color. Do I go a greenish vampire, vampire, dark elf, copper tan, etc? My flash makes it appear that there is more white than what there really is, also I didn't touch up the skin and definitive clothing bits so they still have a heavy white tone from the first few steps.
  8. http://www.wowminisdb.com/Sarmoth.htm Working on some ultracheap prepainted minis for practice with LED lighting before I try working with my Translucent Bonestm. 5mm blue LED taped to two AG3 392 batteries, all contained in the mini. The internal pillar of light happened because over drilling to near the top of the mini. I like the light coming from the core, rather than the upper body, even if it makes the mini look like a possessed nuclear fuel rod. Also did a Crashing Wave Spirit.
  9. These are almost done. 77009 Werewolf: the basecoat reminded me of the maroon and tan Wolverine costume from way back. I promptly got rid of that, but I wish I hadn't. I might try to bring it out a bit at the end. I did blue veins after the basecoat, but they're pretty faded now. The highlights didn't work, but it's a step. I really like the blue eyes - they're piercing... but not too visible from this picture. 77098 Spirit: I wanted to try glow in the dark paint. I based with matte medium. Then I did about 4 coats of glow in the dark paint. It takes a really long time under a lamp to get it to glow faintly. I'm probably going to go for some more coats. It did kinda dry with a cloudy finish, though. Then I saw someone's mini with the clear tamiya, and I decided I wanted to try that. I have some artists' acrylic ink (prussian blue) that I mixed with the matte medium. I used that on the shroud. It looks pretty cool. One thing I love on my ghosts is a pale color as a drybrushed highlight. I really like how the pale blue looks in person. Not sure how close it looks in this photo. This one still needs the plastic base coloured - I'm thinking of trying matte medium with some brown ink I have. Keep things as translucent as possible. I might properly base this one later as an experiment with some Golden Pumice Gel medium.
  10. In this thread, Reaperbryan mentioned that he was having trouble getting detail when photographing the translucent Bones figures. I made some suggestions there, but I decided to do a few experiments, and this thread is the result. Principles: Transparent and translucent subjects are a bit tricky to photograph. There's an old adage* in photography that, "Light reveals; shadows define". Translucents under even light have almost no shadows, so there is no definition and thus no detail. In many ways this is similar to painting OSL or NMM. You need to put light where you need it for highlights without killing the shadows that provide the shapes you're trying to show. Now, not being Reaper meeple, I don't have any of the Reaper Bones Translucents to shoot, so I decided to make do with a mostly unpainted D&D mini that I had around. For reference, this seems to have been washed with a couple of colors, which does enhance the appearance of the figure. The only post processing is cropping to remove dead space and an automatic lens correction to correct optical aberrations. Here are the results: D&D Miniatures Caller in Darkness Technique: 1) Backdrop: A sheet of white seamless paper. In this case, it was an offcut from a full roll of seamless (like this), but it would have worked just fine with any white paper. 2) Fill light: Translucent and transparent subjects usually work well when backlit. In this case, I used a speedlight (Lumopro LP-160, if you care) aimed at the backdrop and snooted (black craft foam cylinder attached to the light) to keep most direct light off of the figures. The backlight shows the inherent colors of the figure well. The light was at 1/16 power, about 18" from the backdrop behind the figure, and camera right approximately level with the figure. 3) Key light: To get shape and detail, I added a second light pointed directly at the figure. This light was another LP-160, also at 1/16 power, about 9" from the figure, shooting through a Lumiquest LQ-III mini-softbox. (Much the same light could have been obtained by using translucent paper in front of the light, but the softbox makes things easy.) I tried several different positions, but ended up preferring camera left, level with the table, about midway between camera and subject. Note that different figures might look best with different key light positions. You would probably do well to move the key around to see what looks best for the figure you're shooting. Note that none of the positions I chose were similar to the position of a pop-up flash. Pop-ups are almost directly on-axis with the lens, which results in very flat lighting, which is exactly the opposite of what we need. 4) Room light: I chose an aperture and shutter speed that killed the ambient completely. When the speedlights were not shooting, I got a nearly completely black frame even though there was standard dining room light directly over the subjects. This makes it easy to work and easy to control the lights that will actually be seen. For reference, I was shooting at ISO 400, 1/250 second, at F/16-ish after sunset. Cheaper version: If you don't have a camera that can shoot fully manual and a suite of photographic lighting equipment, you can get much the same results with a point-and-shoot camera and a couple of desklamps. In that case, you'll probably want to shoot in a mostly dark room, set the lights in about the same configuration I used here, and use a much longer exposure. I chose to use a tripod here, though it really only gained me a consistent camera position, because the flash duration is so short. When shooting with much dimmer continuous lights (and trust me, all continuous lights are much dimmer than strobes), you will need to stabilize your camera, probably with a tripod. But definitely do not use a lightbox with very even lighting, or you'll get flat photos that don't show any detail. Finally, here are a couple of BTS (Behind The Scenes) shots to help illustrate what I was using. You can see the two speedlights to left and right and the tripod in front of the table. The first was shot with the same settings as the figures: The second shot shows the room with the camera adjusted to show the ambient light and the strobes turned off. (If the strobes were on, the center of the image would be completely blown out.) Here you can see the lights on either side of the figure and the tripod (sans camera) near the edge of the table at left: * FWIW, I read it first from Rick Sammon, who might have even said it first. But he's been saying it for a long time, so it's now an old adage.
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