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Found 3 results

  1. I’m away from home (again) with my travel paint kit. I was experimenting a couple of months back with a Zorn palette of 4 paints. A rogue seemed like the sort of person who might want to be somewhat subdued in color, so I decided that this Ral Partha rogue from The Adventurers range (set 98-013 Female Adventurers) would be a good figure to paint with the Zorn colors to stay in practice. It wouldn’t hurt to actually read/watch some theory on NMM, but there’s not too much metal on her besides the dagger, so it should pass on the tabletop. She is part of an effort to ensure a reasonable selection of PCs for my planned OD&D ampaign revival.
  2. Last week I finished up a stand of medieval city militia using a 4-color limited Zorn palette. This turned out to be oddly calming, so I went ahead this week and prepared a second stand of 8 figures (mostly duplicate poses) from the same box of Strelets 1/72 scale plastics. I would ordinarily use 2 stands for something like a Dragon Rampant unit, so it’s nice to have them in matching pairs where possible. I started in on them Friday morning, and had them varnished by supper time on Saturday (when we headed out to a ballroom dance event). I finished up the basing and put a final spray coat on them this afternoon. When I clipped these 8 from their sprues, I collected a few of the more interesting poses for use on individual bases for contingency fantasy games. I finished one of the three this afternoon, still using a Zorn palette. As you can see, these are pretty small compared to the usual Reaper sizes. I was please with how the face came out, given the size. I don’t usually zoom in to the level where the individual brush strokes are showing, but there you are. Given the size, that’s more than you’ll actually see during a game, so it’s really just for my own amusement.
  3. I finally had the opportunity to get to a pending fun project this weekend. I heard about the Zorn palette, a limited set of four colors, a while back, and wanted to try this. So, this is the set of hobby paints I chose. The key is that the black has to be a blue-black, that will give a sort of faded denim when mixed with white. Here’s some playing around on the wet palette. Considering that the only brilliant color you’ll get is red, I thought that the best fit would be something medieval, where the subdued colors would look natural. I removed a batch of Strelets Medieval City Levy from the sprues a couple of weeks ago, because I needed some spearmen for my fantasy campaign, and they seemed like a good choice. So, yesterday morning I started. Knowing that these were going to end in a group, I didn’t worry too much about the occasional stray mold line. After I finished up the 8th figure, I posed them on the stand. I gave them my usual base treatment of sand and white glue, followed by a tuft and some flock. When all of that was dry, a coat of spray varnish: All of these pictures represent a much closer view that would be seen on the table. Anyway, an interesting exercise, and one that I will repeat. For travel painting, a four palette would be handy…
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