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Found 2 results

  1. These are some resin dungeon- and garden-type stone walls. The first are from Ainsty Castings, and they were dreamy to work with. Crisp, flawless molds, tight details, and a paint-receptive surface. The second are from Novus Design Studio, and they ... weren't. There appear to have been many tiny bubbles in the master molds, causing lots of little spherical blisters on the model. The major frustration was that they were water and paint repellent. I had to jump through many hoops to get paint to adhere to their upper parts. Ainsty Castings #1001, 9 cm Dungeon Wall: #1005, 6cm Dungeon Wall Door Section (door is removable and I didn't glue it in) For scale, images with Reaper's 77131, Finaela, Pirate, and Ral Partha / Ironwind Metals Ciera, Swordmistress: Just as a brief break from walls, these are Ainsty Castings #1209, 6cm x 6 cm Dungeon Floor with Small Grill. Details: The Novus Design Studio walls came in a set of six: two each of small, medium, and long walls. Each had a plain stone design on one side and a large skull in an arch on the other. The stones were modeled completely flat. I painted up the skull decorations as if someone was keeping them crudely painted, with cream, black, and red paint. I grew tired of plain grey stones, so added a lot of lichen. The little bubble flaws from the moldmaking process I painted red and figured if anyone asked, they are little fungi. Novus Design Studios #1015 - 28mm Fantasy Wall Set. Finaela for scale. Details:
  2. For my birthday earlier this month my husband gave me various terrain pieces, including these resin pieces from Novus Design Studio. They are: 1019 - 28mm Fantasy Bridge; 1052 - 28mm Artillery Position; 1015 - 28mm Fantasy Wall Set; and 1079 - 15mm Stalingrad Red October Factory Ruin, or as I have been thinking of them: the bridge, the cul-de-sac, the walls, and the really cool even if it is a little small abandoned factory. I've never worked with resin before, and this has had something of a learning curve even for the priming. I scrubbed these things well with warm water and dish liquid, but wow, do they repel paint in parts. At first I mixed the paint with a little flow release, but that didn't work out too well. It still beaded up and the dried paint film was soft and susceptible to being picked up by a wet brush, suggesting a weak paint film later on. This is how they looked after a single coat of primer: The walls were mostly okay, with at least one wall having a ferociously paint-resistant top, even after double scrubbing with hot water and strong dish soap. Not even rubbing alcohol could break the beading and surface tension. So I switched tactics. I decided to mix my paint with a medium I have used previously when painting fiberglass sculpture, GAC 200 from Golden Paints which improves adhesion and reduces tack when dry. This is why I blinked when I first saw Reaper paints: The other thing I would do is keep a hair dryer blowing on the paint to dry it fast before it had a chance to bead up. This necessitated the sacrifice of a couple of brushes because they had to be used under warm blowing air. It also required a certain amount of juggling hands. But it seems to have worked, and the paint film is much stronger. This is how the pieces looked after the second coat of primer: And the third coat of primer. I had to stop using the camera's flash because they looked so white they only had a silhouette of the shape. In real life they do not look quite this opaque white: The factory I did last. It looks really cool, but all the detail is at the moment washed out by the white primer. I didn't remove all the flash and I think the hexagonal spaces in the ceiling supports were supposed to be cut out, but there's only so much work I have the spoons for in prep.
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