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Found 319 results

  1. Well, I've gone and done it. I got a YouTube channel and have started making a series of videos on matters of paint and painting. Okay, I say "series of videos" all grandly, but at the moment it's one video and a planned syllabus. But I have more planned! This is pretty much my first video ever. I was helped a great deal by my family members who have more experience in this. The first video is a paint comparison, looking at one of the new Liquitex Acrylic Gouache paints (Quinacridone Magenta, PR122) and considering its suitability for miniatures painting. Enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwonRqv0Xgk
  2. This miniature is 15503C Nyamaunir Piratin, a catgirl pirate from Das Schwarze Auge (The Dark Eye, Germany's 1980s answer to Dungeons and Dragons). She's a little Old School and a little short even for that. I like that she looks like a cat who is a person in sensible pirating clothes. There was a WIP thread, but it didn't get very far.
  3. This is Stonehaven's Half-Orc Mechanist, a nice little character for the more open-minded steampunk campaign. The quote in the title of the thread is from Gail Carriger, author of the "Soulless" steampunk series. I actually finished him around Christmas, but I never put up the Show Off thread. So here he is. Questions, critiques and comments welcome. WIP thread here.
  4. This is Stonehaven's Half-Orc Nobleman, another nice and eccentric steampunk character. The quote in the title of the thread is from Beau Brummell. Comments, etc. welcome. WIP thread here. This is all paint:
  5. I could have sworn I had started a thread already. Ah, well. Here's a drawing I did related to a vampire game, with an enlarged detail to show pencil work. It's 5 inches by 8 (12.7 x 20.3 cm). The detail is about 1.75 x 2 inches (4.4 x 5 cm).
  6. This is Hasslefree HFD104 Drya Lafhelgasdottir, sculpted by Tre Manor, and not, as I identified all through the WIP thread, a Red Box Games dwarf. I think I was confused because she was by Tre Manor. She is also the last, the seventh, of the dwarves I painted for the project "Jade Green and Seven Dwarfs," an effort both to get some dwarves painted up for general gaming use, and to make a group of Jadeborn for a game of Exalted. This is a photo of all the project's figures together:
  7. This is Stonehaven's Half-Orc Librarian, a pleasantly sinister and unassuming character. The quote in the title of the thread is from Neil Gaiman. Comments et alia welcome, natch. WIP thread here.
  8. The Stonehaven Half-Orc Kickstarter fulfilled recently. The figures were really inspiring, and I have a use for several of them already. I'm in a campaign in a steampunkish world with many different races. Anyhow, these are the four half-orcs I'm painting up for it: the Gentleman, the Librarian, the Artificer, and the Pistoleer (not sure if those are official names for them). I have glued them to their bases, primed them white, and washed over them with Burnt Umber. I've loosely shaded in their faces with a grey mixed from Burnt Sienna and Phthalo Green and white, but I haven't added any facial details yet. The gentleman would of course be wearing gloves, so I haven't painted his hands yet. The Pistoleer probably would too, but I felt like painting her hands anyway. The Artificer appears to have bare toes sticking out of his exo-suit, or whatever it is.
  9. Well, now. This is a bit of an unusual project. Earlier this year @malefactus kindly sent me some unpainted miniatures that he thought I could get some use out of. Among them was an already based and primed copy of Reaper's 14016, Judas Bloodspire, Necropolis Warlord, sculpted by the legendary Werner Klocke. I had already painted a quickie version the Bones version of the sculpt, 77160: Judas Bloodspire, Vampire and had discovered how fun the sculpt was, so I was pleased to have another to paint, especially since it was mounted on one of malefactus' inimitable bases. I am not entirely sure how malefactus put this together. The central cylinder and the base seem to be wood. He sculpted pavement on the upper base and added something like moss and his signature mushrooms and primed the whole thing in black with white brushed over it. In transit the cape (whose attachment is always a delicate piece of this figure) had come loose, so I cleaned the glue off it and set it aside to paint separately and rejoin later. While playing around with how to attach the cape I discovered a different angle of attachment from the standard pose which appears to be more stable, and which I plan to try. More details on that later, or you can check out the link. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. Here the figure is almost as malefactus sent it to me. I have set aside his cape and already put a light wash of green on the mossy bits. This was a simple transparent mix of Phthalocyanine Green and Burnt Sienna, my go-to mix for foliage. It's completely transparent and acts like a watercolor wash. I layered on several coats of varying mixes of the two pigments, sometimes adding a little Ultramarine Blue, also a transparent color, or Hansa Yellow Opaque, which despite its name is only semi-translucent. This lets all of malefactus' shading show through. I like to paint skin and especially faces before the rest of the figure. I've been painting up my vampire figures with completely colorless skin mixed from Titanium White and Carbon Black, so I did that here. The metal figure has much more delicate details than the Bones. The fangs are a mix of Titanium White and Yellow Ochre and the lips and eyes are pure Red Oxide and Hansa Yellow Opaque with Carbon Black. For a color scheme I decided on a contrast to my Bones Judas Bloodspire, who had white hair, a red cloak, blue drapery and a rather misunderstood outfit (I had painted him very quickly, only intending him for tabletop use. I fell in love with the sculpt as I painted.) This one will have a dark blueish or purple cape (still thinking about that), a red greatcoat, and brown hair (maybe with some white streaks. I do like white streaks.). I didn't take pix of the hair painting, but you can see the results in the cape-position testing pictures here. His hair was, I believe, underlaid in a medium brown mixed from Burnt Sienna with a little Ultramarine Blue and Yellow Ochre and Titanium White, then glazed with Burnt Umber and maybe some Burnt Sienna too. (Browns are complex!) No highlights yet. I also painted malefactus' paving stones with a cold grey mixed from Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Sienna, and Titanium White, visible in some photos. Next: Beginning the figure.
  10. Apparently I never started a WIP thread for this miniature. This is Reaper's 50304: Rowena Von Graaf, sculpted by Julie Guthrie, which I started painting a long time ago. She's a fun steampunk figure. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers. I decided to paint her with a pretty black face. Here's a close-up of her face. There are tiny white points which are microscopic unpainted pits in the figure. They are much smaller irl than they show up in the photographs. I am slowly (maddeningly) working to fill them in as I go. I decided to paint her underskirt pink. This is Quinacridone Magenta lightened with Titanium White. And the base coat on her dress and spats is straight Red Oxide. And this is where I left her (cough) about a year and a half ago. More to come!
  11. This is Reaper's 59009: Mad Scientist, sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. I thank Reaper for proffering Victorian Science Ladies in Big Dresses, and I am looking forward to painting her up. I am, as usual, working with Golden matte fluid acrylic paints. This is my standard priming, a thin wash of thinned-down Titanium White allowed to dry for a day then washed further with thinned-down Burnt Umber. I don't know if I've mentioned, but this is a classic Italian Renaissance priming technique. I can't remember the term, but it translates as "veil" of color and is supposed to give richness to subsequent layers of color. In this case it also makes details pop. I clearly missed a few spots with the Burnt Umber. I will be repairing those as I go along. I started with her skin. I like the Foglios' "Girl Genius" comic, so she is a little inspired by them. They have plenty of diversity in their cast, and I thought this figure might look well with darker skin. I have found that Burnt Umber, a slightly cool, rich dark brown, makes a good basis for dark human skin. This is the first layer, a light scumble (like a glaze but using a lighter color over a darker instead of vice versa) of Burnt Umber lightened just a touch with Titanium White. Dark skin, I find, looks well with warm highlights based on Yellow Ochre. I painted her skin quite dark, so I made the highlights a little cooler, less Yellow Ochre and more Titanium White, admixed with Burnt Umber. Here she is with her skin finished and her eyes painted in. I washed some clear Quinacridone Magenta over her lips. Her eyes were pretty enormous to begin with and I made them even larger. I am thinking mauve for her dress. Purple ftw!
  12. This is the mermaid from the old Grenadier boxed set #6004, "Monsters of Mythology" from their Fantasy Lords range. I used to have the set, once upon a time. This was one of my favorite figures from it (though I painted it very differently back in the day and I am pretty sure my memories of how well I painted it are seriously rose-tinted). There isn't a WIP thread. And because I do like to play around with photographic backgrounds and water effects:
  13. Sobek was a complex crocodile god of the ancient Egyptians. He was god of fertility, wild sexytimes and strength, and also a protector against the ravages of the river Nile and its inhabitants. The khopesh was a kind of ancient Egyptian sword evolved from a battle axe. The one on this sculpt is a little thicker and more swordlike than most of the ones I've seen, which makes it sturdier on a miniatures scale. The figure is Reaper's 14381, Nefsokar Devourer of Ammat, sculpt by Bob Ridolfi. I didn't make a WIP thread. I was halfway done with him before I realized that he was supposed to be a stone statue with cracks and chips in the stone. Maybe another time I will paint a version of him like that, but in this case I overlooked the texture and painted him with fairly realistic crocodile and corroded bronze colors. And because I like to play around with photography and backgrounds:
  14. I thought I had a WIP thread for her, but apparently not. I know I posted a half-done photo of her once, long ago. At any rate, here is a blast from the past and my past as well, the long-languishing Reaper 59037, Deadlands Noir Femme Fatale, sculpted by Bob Ridolfi. And because I like to play around with backgrounds:
  15. This is 03415, Lanura Windsong, Elf Sorcerer, sculpted by Julie Guthrie. She's an appealing sculpt -- and popular, judging from all the painted versions in the store and the Inspiration Gallery. I picked her up years ago after seeing someone's lovely version on these forums, and now I've gotten round to her. She has high boots and a long coat and a cute scarf over short tousled curls. I think of her as a sort of corsair or pirate, maybe, with lots of wands and things. I am looking forward to painting all those spheres on her like colored crystal. I have been trying to limit the number of female minis I paint with bare midriffs, but she's just so dang cute! All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics, except where noted. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers. I started laying in her skin tone with the darks pure Burnt Umber and the lights a golden-bronze mix of Burnt Umber, Yellow Ochre, and a little Titanium White. I also am spending some time on each pass tucking paint into all the tiny white dots where the paint failed to get into a nook or cranny. I don't normally paint much with pure black, but here I used some Carbon Black to color her hair and as a wash to lay in a few darker shadows on her and start to contour her face and eye sockets. Then I picked up some more highlights with the golden-bronze again, and a little more pure black shading. And then look, it's a face! Her sclerae are a pale grey mixed from Titanium White and a little Carbon Black. Her pupils are pure Carbon Black, highlights are pure Titanium White. Lips a base of Red Iron Oxide shaded with Burnt Umber and Quinacridone Magenta. Some more contouring with the bronze and Umber shadows and Bob's your uncle.
  16. lstormhammer

    Good Eats!

    Yes, this is the repository for all things culinary. We've fired off recipes, we've traded family secrets (well, not all of them) and mentioned our favorite cooking shows. So here it is, fire them keyboards up and give us all things food-related! --lstormhammer, summoning up the Iron Chefs!
  17. It's time again for a year-end roundup of the figures I managed to finish last year. These are the figures I finished during the calendar year of 2018, which was, let me tell you, another ... interesting year. January-March
  18. This is the classic Reaper 02551, Monique Denoir. There are some gorgeously painted examples of her out there. Some of this post is quoted from an earlier post, since I find that giving information in each thread is useful, even if in the big picture it's redundant. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. Monique Denoir is a Werner Klocke scupt. Her face is classical and lovely. She's certainly popular, and there are many beautifully painted versions out there. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. (I seem to be having a little trouble with it crackling just a bit in some areas, though.) It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers (even though, as I've said before, with a vampire you don't necessarily want "warmth".) I like to paint skin first as something of the undermost layer. After I have the skin more or less smooth and correct I paint the features. I have been painting up vampires with stark white skin because I don't seem to have the knack to make them look undead if there is even a little flesh tone in their skin. This is almost the only time I ever mix grey from pure black and white (rather than a complex mix of brighter colors). The flatness of tone conveys that something is wrong with the individual, and the simplicity of color mix is very easy to shade. I started with a thin wash of pure Titanium White on her face, bust, and hands (I got her right hand wrong, I see in the photos. I missed her right thumb and painted up part of the sword instead. Be assured Werner Klocke's sculpt is much less clumsy than that. I will correct it later.). The first approximation of shadows are added, mixed from simple Titanium White and Carbon Black. And some darker and lighter greys. At the moment the shading is very stylized.
  19. I am almost certain this RAFM miniature, RAF02802, "Desirée Dark, Mercenary," sculpted by Werner Klocke, is meant to be the character Selene from the "Underworld" series. I painted her up, though, as a regular human. To compare and for the amusement value, here's one of the first figures I painted after coming back to minis after a twenty-year hiatus, a few years ago. It's another version of Selene from "Underworld," this one from Hasslefree (Hasslefree HFA021: Dionne (B)). I ... think my style has changed, some, the last few years.
  20. This RAFM mini came in an assorted lot of female "modern" adventurers. Between the camera, the suit and the shoes she looked a little pre-modern, at least hardboiled detective noir era anyway. Then I primed her and thought "Holy cow, this is Lois Lane, plucky girl reporter." I mean, she isn't, not officially. Not even in a wink-and-nudge way. But by golly, that's how I think of her and that's how I'm going to paint her up. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers.
  21. Spotted this at Adepticon and found the idea of a steampunk mermaid too fun to pass up. She is exquisitely sculpted with elegant little hands and careful details. I think I would like to paint her a little like a tropical fish, bright yellow with orange stripes. This is my basic figure priming: Removal of mold lines (not too many of those), epoxied to the base, primed thinly with Titanium White and washed with Burnt Umber. I then started building up thin layers of Yellow Ochre (aka Mars Yellow aka Yellow Iron Oxide), a nearly-opaque earth yellow, normally a little dull in color but brighter in thin layers, lightened in places with Titanium White, and a few Titanium White highlights. I used Raw Sienna, a very slightly browner yellow, on the base.
  22. This is Reaper's 60184: Meyanda, Android Priestess, from the Pathfinder line, sculpted by Bobby Jackson. I painted her up as a Jadeborn for a game of Exalted. The Jadeborn come in three castes, one of which looks like elves made of jade and the other two look like dwarves made of earth tones. I used this as an excuse to paint up some dwarves, which I hadn't done much of, in the WIP thread, "Jade Green and Seven Dwarfs, here. She was fun to paint. There is a lot of great detail on her.
  23. This is Reaper's classic vampire warrior, #02551, Monique Denoir, sculpted by Werner Klocke. She's wonderfully menacing. She casts no shadow on the base. WIP thread here.
  24. The thread about the Drider and centaur I Frankensteined up from some Reaper and Citadel parts reminded me of this little gem I put together this summer as part of a coterie of Drow. I was originally inspired by the Reaper Bones Conversions thread Chaoswolf started, which had some cool examples of substituting Bones torsos on the Bones Dark Elf Arachnid Warriors. Since Bones are so easy to cut and carve up and glue together, I thought I'd give it a try. So this is the spider body from Reaper #77182, Arachnid Archer, and the upper half of #77057, Juliette, Female Sorceress. I carved her carefully to leave a peg for the spider body, and I've carved out little sockets on the spider body for the bags and flasks around her waist. This is a dry fitting, where you can see the way the two pieces more or less fit together under the waist: Here she is glued. I used epoxy (I know, I know, but I like its space-filling qualities). I left it thin on the back of her torso and added another layer once it had dried, let it get to the gloopy sticky phase, and carved some striations in it with a bamboo skewer to match the hairiness of the spider body. Here she is primed with Reaper Brown Liner, ready to paint:
  25. How slowly has this WIP gone? I started these elves in late spring 2016. Because of events and shake-ups I set aside all my work from that time, but now I have picked them up again. For this WIP I am making a warband of three female and one male Drow with support from a female sorceress Drider. The three women are the wonderful set 03516: DHL Classics: Dark Elves sculpted by the inimitable Sandra Garrity. I'm going to identify each separately because they also have individual SKUs and names and it's easier to keep track of them that way. The man is 14046: Ardynn, Elf Hero sculpted by Werner Klocke; he is not intended as a Drow, but he looks so cranky I think he will do well as one. The Drider is a Bones mash-up of 77182: Arachnid Archer plus the torso of 77057: Juliette, Sorceress, as detailed in this thread. All paints used are Golden Matte Fluid Acrylics. Color mixes are (usually) noted, but not exact ratios. Questions are welcomed and I will try to answer them. Critiques are appreciated. This is the way I usually start miniature figures: Lightly primed with Titanium White, then when that is dry, washing it over with Burnt Umber. Burnt Umber is a dark, transparent pigment that settles into crannies when thinned down and shows the details very well. It also gives a nice warm undertone to later paint layers. To begin with I painted the three women's weaponry straight Carbon Black, with the thought that I would paint over it later with metallics or iridescents, which always look better against a dark underpainting. I mixed a transparent dark blue-black from Burnt Sienna and Ultramarine Blue and washed it over the three women's skin, and a bit lightly over their hair to begin to work where shadows will be, The first dark elf in the Garrity set is also sold as 02574: Female Dark Elf. The second is also Reaper's 02524: Female Dark Elf Cleric And the third is 02460: Vernicia I then mixed some Titanium White with the blue-black to make a cold blue grey and added rough lights to the skin, and white to the hair. Ardynn I started a little differently, with blue-grey mixes from Ultramarine Blue, Burnt Sienna, and Titanium White and a bit of straight white in his hair from the start. This is my custom-made Drider, primed with Reaper's Brown Liner diluted somewhat: I painted her skin and hair the same way I did Ardynn's. This is the crude beginnings: Next time: Faces! And arghy bits I missed, like Ardynn's hands.
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