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Found 2850 results

  1. I think most GM's can sympathise, sometimes your players just get lucky going through a dungeon. Maybe the dice are on their side or maybe they're just a bunch of min/maxing little murder hobos that have destroyed everything in their path. What you need is one final encounter, one last way to try and salvage at least some of your pride and show them that they're not quite as in control as they think they are. There's a room. It's certainly locked and probably warded and what player can resist that? Once they force their way the find this ancient stone circle. There's some sort of mossy ooze growing on its base, but the players attention is drawn to the softly pulsing light from the giant cabochon jewels set as eyes in the carved dragon heads. How can they resist? A massive thanks to @TaleSpinner for sculpting such an awesome piece, it was a pleasure to paint! This is when you turn around the portal What comes out of it? Not sure, but its certainly something draconic, maybe even something with 5 heads Thanks for looking, all comments and criticisms are gratefully received. Hope you liked it.
  2. A long time ago, in March 2019 to be exact, @NomadZeke set a painting challenge for that years April Fools Day. Paint something ridiculous.......20 months later I finally finished my entry for it He's based on a Pathfinder Huge pawn holder for ease of use in games. I absolutely adore this mini, in my opinion it's the best Huge sized dragons on the market and one of Julie Guthrie's most stunning sculpts I humbly present to you, Kyphrixis the multi-hued Rainbow Dragon! Hope y'all like him, as always all comments and criticisms are happily received
  3. I'm sure many of you can sympathise- we see a cool model in a kickstarter, finally get it delivered and then sit flummoxed whilst trying to figure out exactly how to paint said mini. This Mystic Portal has been sitting on my painting desk since last June and I finally figured out what to do with it. Imagine that your players have just finished ransacking your meticulously planned dungeon/keep/cavern system. They've breezed through the encounters, possibly due to good dice rolls or possibly that they're a bunch of min/maxing little murder hobos. What you need is one final encounter, one last chance for them to shine or to let them spectacularly fail. There's one last room left and it's securely locked. It'll certainly be magically warded and if I know my players then that's a challenge that they won't be able to pass up. Inside the room is a single portal, made of nondescript stone but with stunning looking gems set into the eyes of it's carved dragons. Surely none of them would be daft enough to trigger an obviously dangerous portal? You haven't met my players My plan to paint one side of the portal the naturalistic stone colour and to paint the other side the fully active, just about to summon a multi headed dragon, portal. This means that when they invariably trigger it, all I have to do is spin it around and savour their worried/confused faces Here's hoping that I can actually do it justice. This is the portal. It's cast in translucent bonesium, which I like because it gives you a choice between taking advantage to it's see through quality or to just paint it like a normal mini. I opted to paint it as normal. There was a slight bit of warping on the base piece, but the old 'boiling/ice water' trick sorted it out in 5 minutes. I'm planning on setting the base on some warning runes, so I used the Greenstuff World Dwarven rolling pin on some foam to see how it would fit onto the pattern. On to the painting! I painted the inactive side of the portal Cloudy Grey 9089 and the active side Pure Black 9037. I'm not sure if I'm going to fuzz up this line or leave it as a stark contrast. I added a black/ green wash to dirty up the stone and added a little bit of orange to the stone to give it a little bit of texture The real work begins! I started blocking in the colours for the active side of the portal. Red, purplish black, white, green and blue. It's almost as if I'm trying to match my half finished Ma'al Drakar My coordination went a bit wobbly with the foo dogs(which are awesome, btw!) so that's where I left it for tonight. We've got a storm coming in tomorrow, so I'm hoping to get some more work done on it tomorrow. Any comments/criticism/suggestions are, as always, warmly received.
  4. Hello Reaper friends! You might remember I did a whole tribe of Hill Giants on a display board, with hex bases? This is my follow up to that, this time: Stone Giants. Errrm, it all got a bit out of hand, and I'd LOVE some input from you all, please This is where I'm at after a week and I'm a bit stuck tbh. I think I need to decide more about what the "finish" will look like before I go a lot further. Once I cover that foam with more than paint it's going to be harder to make changes. I'm thinking of sort of "cladding" it in pieces of slate, with sculpted bits / groundwork in the gaps? I'd also love to hear suggestions for other miniatures and features to add to the scene to break up those big open rocky spaces. Current extra bits and bobs are just there for a sense of scale and how extra minis might "interrupt" or "enhance" the scene. Some next steps though: - cork around the hexes on the platforms for the bases to fit into - some sort of "door frame" - "box in" the sides (which are cut out of a continuing mountainside, in my head at least) Please, rain your ideas and encouragements upon me!
  5. It's the perfect time of year to show off this little collection of spooky minis! Giant Bats 44040 These little guys are adorable. They're pretty simple, and it's hard to pick out details in their faces, but I think they're fantastic little minis. Though their size clearly makes them giant bats, I can definitely see myself using them as "normal-sized" bats for Wildshape or Familiar purposes. I specifically used the Little Brown Bat as my coloration reference. More Bat Photos Below: Harrowgate Shrine 77723 Next up is a bit of scatter terrain. This is one of the two models in the Harrowgate Shrines set. What could it be? An ancient omen? The gravestone for a horrific creature? Or perhaps the beast itself is encased in stone! It's not the most exciting of models, but I thought it fit nicely with this little set. I probably should have based it, but I like basing scatter pieces on flat bases and didn't have one the right size for this. Might base it in the future. More Shrine Photos Below: Werebat 77448 And rounding out this set we have the big baddie: the werebat! I really like how dynamic this guy is. Really get the sense he's about to lunge at you, or take off to the skies. I painted him up like the giant bats. Don't love the paintjob, but it works. I really like how his base turned out though. The model comes on a roughly 1" circular base, but he's pretty top heavy. I didn't want to give him a 2" base, but I'm really starting to enjoy basing these oversized models on 40mm rounds. Especially with that tapering rim, they fit nicely without looking out-of-scale compared to other "medium" sized creatures. More Werebat Photos Below: So what's the story? What would you use these minis for?
  6. Just pulled these out of the drawer. One of these Orcs was next in line on the Bones I Kickstarter Rewards image, so I’ll try to squad-paint them together to save time. They have been cleaned of mold lines. The spearman’s spear was very bent, as was the great sword. So, those got weapon swapped with basic weapons from Bones 3. Those are darker grey. Washed them, so just waiting for them to dry. Also had to gap fill spearman’s wrists.
  7. I put together a few documents related to using Bones. I've submitted these to the Craft section of the website, but as it may be a little while before Reaper has the time available to add them, Bryan suggested that I post them here. Bones - Frequently Asked Questions Bones - Preparation (mould line removal, glue, putty, etc.) Bones - The First Coat is the Difference (this document) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Painting Bones Miniatures: The First Coat is the Difference One of the revolutionary features of Bones miniatures is that you can paint them straight out of the package. Because this is such a departure from recommendations for painting metal or resin miniatures, it is understandable that this feature raises questions and concerns for painters unfamiliar with Bones. Painters familiar with other types of miniatures will find that there are some differences in how the first coat of paint behaves, or that there are painting techniques or substances that require a little tweaking to use as a first coat on Bones figures. The Bones material is a little hydrophobic, meaning that it tends to repel water. Paint diluted with water, sometimes even just a little water, may display a tendency to bead up or pull away from crevices or higher raised areas. The more water added to the paint, the greater this effect. The first coat of paint applied to the surface can also take a little longer to dry than usual. The image on the left is a Bones figure straight out of the blister, the one on the right is a primed Dark Heaven metal miniature. Each was painted with a brushstroke of Master Series Walnut Brown paint of various dilutions. From right to left: undiluted; 1:1 paint water ratio; heavily diluted. On the Bones figure, the stripes painted with diluted paint display beading and pulling away, but the stripe painted with undiluted paint covers smoothly with clean edges. Once you apply a first coat of paint, primer or other appropriate surface preparation to a Bones miniature, you can freely use paint of any dilution and the full array of painting techniques! Painters who prefer to use thinned base coats, those who like to start with a dark wash over white primer, and those who use black or custom coloured primer need not despair! The following information will help you find ways to tweak your preferred techniques to work with the Bones material. It also includes information about brands of primer, paint and other substances that are known to work or not work well with Bones, and tests of the utility and durability of certain of these products on Bones. Slightly Thicker Paint Will Not Obscure All the Sculpted Details For years painters have been reading tips and tutorials that exhort them to thin their paints so as not to obscure the detail sculpted into their figures, and to obtain a better quality paint job. While it’s definitely the case that using excessively thick paint can affect detail and paint quality, I think it is also true that some people are worrying too much about this in regards to painting Bones. Reaper Master Series and Master Series HD are produced with a consistency pretty close to ideal for base coats. Several other miniature paint lines are produced in a similar consistency, or require only a small amount of water to reach the correct consistency. Two or three layers of such paint will not clog up all the detail on your model. Also, remember that when you paint metal or resin miniatures, you normally paint over a coat of primer. One layer of undiluted paint on a Bones miniature is equivalent in thickness (if not thinner) than one or two coats of primer on a metal or resin figure. The picture above is of four Bones bases. The tiny text relief sculpted into the bottom of these is a perfect way to test whether paint coats obscure small detail. Each of these bases was given four coats of a substance, and then brushed over with a paint wash to bring out the detail. (The bottles of paint and primer used in this test were fairly fresh, no more than a year or two old.) From left to right, the bases were coated with four coats of undiluted Master Series Pure White, four coats of undiluted Master Series White Primer, and four coats of undiluted Master Series Brush-On Sealer. I prepared a second base with the Brush-On Sealer as the wash didn’t quite turn out on the first. The word ‘Miniatures’ has lost a little detail on the base coated with four undiluted coats of paint, but apart from that both it and the primer coated base still have excellent detail. The text is still mostly legible on the bases coated with Brush-On Sealer, but some detail has been obscured. Wash Bones Figures Before Painting Many people find that the paint is less likely to bead up if the figure has been washed. Also, if you’ve had your figure out of the blister for a while, or you’ve handled it to remove mould lines or otherwise prepare it, you should clean it before painting, as it probably has dust and skin oils on it that may repel paint or cause paint to chip off after it has dried. All you need to clean it is some dishwashing liquid and an old toothbrush. Give it a scrub, and then rinse it really well to get off all the soap. Let it dry before painting. (You can hurry up the drying with a hairdryer set on low.) Black Primer? Custom Colours? Paint One Coat of Paint over the Entire Figure First! Some painters prefer to paint over black or gray primer. Others start with a primer of a particular colour to speed up painting units. For example, you could paint a coat of khaki on a unit of modern army figures and be half way finished painting their uniforms. One way to get the same effect as a dark wash over white primer on Bones is to first apply an all-over coat of white paint, followed by a dark wash. (Keep reading for other ways to do washes directly on Bones.) Some Primers Work on Bones Traditional metal or resin miniatures need to be primed before any paint is applied. Paint applied over bare metal does not adhere well, and rubs off with even light handling. Primer etches into the metal on a microscopic level. Paint adheres well to primer, so using it forms a stronger bond. Bones figures do not suffer from this issue! Acrylic paint painted directly onto the Bones surface is as durable, if not more durable, than if you use paint over primer on Bones. If you still prefer to use primer, Reaper’s Brush-On Primer works well on Bones, and is available in black and white. Another product people sometimes ask about is gesso. Fine arts painters use gesso to prepare canvases for painting. Some people have experimented with liquid gesso as a primer for miniatures, Bones and otherwise. People have reported it working in terms of creating a surface that you can paint thinned paint over. Reports vary as to how durable the material is, so it may not be the best choice for miniatures that are going to be handled. For those who prefer to use spray primer, the best option is to use an airbrush to apply a coat of acrylic paint to the Bones figure. Reaper Master Series paint thins well with Golden or Liquitex Airbrush Medium, and maintains its strong adhesion, though I have found that adding airbrush medium does noticeably increase the drying time of the paint. Aerosol spray primers and some spray paints can have some issues with Bones (and with other plastics). The chemicals in some of these primers and paints do not react well with Bones. The main effect seems to be that the primer never completely cures, remaining tacky to the touch. Some will also fail to form a bond with the Bones material. The following is a list of aerosol paints and primers that people on the Reaper forums have reported testing on Bones. Please consider the list just a guide. The best idea is to test your chosen spray by using it on a small Bones figure you don’t care about a lot. After you give the spray time to cure, carefully look over the figure to make sure the chemicals in the spray haven’t reacted with the Bones material to melt or otherwise damage it. If not, test the primer surface by touching it to see if it stays too tacky to paint over. Also, flex parts of the figure to make sure the primer doesn’t crack. Note: Some people have successfully used Krylon primer, and possibly other spray primers that some people have reported as problematic. And other people have reported problems with primers that some felt worked well. One difference seems to be that a light spray rather than a heavy coating is more likely to minimize tackiness. Environmental factors such as temperature and humidity are also always a big variable with any spray product. Recommended aerosol spray primers and paints: Army Painter white and coloured primers Krylon Dual Paint + Primer Duplicolor Sandable – slight tackiness possible Rust-oleam Painter’s Touch Ultra Cover 2x – slight tackiness possible Problem aerosol spray primers and paints: Krylon white primer – doesn’t bond, stays tacky Testors Enamel flat black – stays tacky Walmart Valu flat white – stays tacky Krylon Primer red-brown – stays tacky Citadel spray Use a Medium to Thin Your Paint or Make a Wash Water is the element in thinned paint that causes it to bead up on the Bones surface. If you try thinning your paint with a dilutant other than water, you may be able to create a mix that is closer to the consistency you like to paint with. Depending on what you use, you can even create something translucent enough to act as a wash or glaze directly on the Bones. Mediums designed to work with acrylic paints are good products to try. Examples are matte medium, glazing medium, airbrush medium. Reaper’s Brush-On Sealer can be used this way. Note that many of these products are a little less fluid than water, so they may not dramatically change the consistency of the paint (it’ll still feel a little thick rather than watery, but it will look a lot more transparent). You can also test adding just a drop or so of water to your mix of paint and medium to see if you can get closer to the consistency you prefer. I diluted some Master Series Bone Shadow with various mediums to make washes. From left to right, the products are listed below. Master Series Brush-On Sealer: I added one drop of water to a large drop of paint and several drops of Sealer. Worked well. Liquitex Matte Medium: A thick product. I added a drop of water. Beads up too much to work well for a wash. Liquitex Glazing Medium: Another thick product, I added a drop of water to my mix. Took longer to dry than the others. Did not sit in crevices well enough to work well for a wash. Very shiny finish. Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium: Applied well, dried quickly. Even application of the colour. Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer: Worked decently, seems a bit more inclined to pool in the crevices with less colouring on the surfaces. Shiny finish. ADDEDUM (not pictured) Golden Acrylic Flow Release (undiluted): Applied well. Took a little while to dry. Shiny finish. Reaper Flow Improver: Applied well. Took a little while to dry. Finish is shiny in areas where wash pooled. Use a Medium as a Primer Because of how well acrylic based products adhere to the Bones material, it is also possible to use mediums as a primer alternative. Once dry, you can paint over them using thinned paint. These are applied by brush, or possibly with an airbrush. I tested a number of different brush-on products on some Bones Cave Trolls. These were straight out of the package and had not been cleaned. After the products dried, I applied a thin coat of paint to see how it behaved over each product. Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer: Exhibited slight pulling away from some high or curved surfaces, though generally it just required running the brush over that section again to establish coverage. Dried quickly. Reaper Master Series Brush-On Sealer: No significant beading. Dried quickly. Paint was less durable than with the other products, see the durability testing section for more details and pictures. Golden Airbrush Medium: Bubbled a bit when applied, thin enough to pool a bit in depressions. Took more than 40 minutes to dry. This product works well if you use a drop or three to thin paint down for a base coat, although it does increase the drying time slightly. Due to it drying time, this is not the best choice as a primer alternative or for thinning washes that will be applied directly over Bones. Liquitex Matte Medium: Somewhat thick. Minor beading and pulling away. Significant beading when thinned with water. Dried quickly. When paint was applied, there were still some mild occurrences of paint pulling away from higher/curved areas. Liquitex Glazing Medium: Pretty thick consistency. Dried fairly quickly. The paint coat still beaded a little. Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium: Dried fairly quickly. Paint went on quite nicely. Also works on metal miniatures. Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer: Dried quickly. The paint layer exhibited slightly pulling way. Folk Art Blending Gel: Extremely thick. Beaded up too much to use. Not pictured as it worked too poorly to continue to the testing stage. Speed Paint Drying with a Hairdryer Whether on a Bones or metal miniature, if you find that your paint is taking too long to dry, you can speed up the drying by using a hairdryer on the low setting on the paint. If the paint you’re drying is a wash, you should let it dry naturally for a little bit, or you risk blowing the paint out of the crevices and depressions you want to darken. Testing the First Coats for Durability Once you get your paint applied, you want to make sure that it stays there. In my experiments, the most durable Bones miniatures are those where the first coat applied to the miniature is undiluted Master Series paint. Several of the other substances I tested were pretty close in durability, but it should be noted that there were a few that performed poorly. I painted these ghosts in August 2012. They accompanied me to Gen Con and Pax Prime 2012, stored loose with some unpainted Bones in a plastic container I carried in my backpack. Their travels included a six hour car ride and return plane trip. At the conventions they were handled extensively by dozens upon dozens of people, including being tossed on tables. The paint jobs were stressed pretty much equally through the Gen Con trials. The ghost painted only with Reaper Master Series paint was handled a lot more than the others during the Pax Prime trials. The ghost sculpt has some thin and thus particularly bendy areas, most notably on the hood and where it meets the tombstone. I flexed these parts by hand repeatedly to additionally stress the paint. Unfortunately I chose poor colours to easily be able to see all the damage in the photos. After the first coat I used painting techniques of thinned layers and washes with no difficulty and with the same effect on each of the miniatures. From left to right the first coat on each miniature was as follows. Undiluted Reaper Master Series Paint: Displayed the least damage during the Gen Con trials. Following Pax, has some chips at the flex point on the hood and near the tombstone. Was handled a lot more than the other figures. Reaper Master Series Brush-On White Primer: A few very small chips at the flex points, and some paint has scraped off a few sharp protruding areas. (Edge of the hood, finger tips on one hand.) Dupli-Color Sandable White Primer Spray: The unpainted base stayed slightly tacky to the touch for weeks after priming. The figure has several small areas where paint was scraped off, but only one chip on a flex point. Testors Dullcote Spray: This product created a good surface for painting, but performed very poorly in the paint durability tests, and I would not recommend using it as a primer substitute if you plan to use your Bones for gaming. Chips formed on the major flex points early in the Gen Con testing, and the paint has flaked off extensively from there. The figure also has some small areas of scraping damage, but those are no more notable than on the Brush-On Primer or Dupli-Color figures. I wanted to perform a similar test with the other surface preparation products I tried. First I painted on an additional coat or two of paint. Then I placed the figures loose in a plastic box with some other Bones, a wooden, MDF and plastic base, and a metal figure. After wrapping the box in a towel secured with rubber bands, I put it in my dryer on the air setting for 10 minutes or so. The green painted areas on each figure are those that were painted over the primer alternatives. The brown painted areas are Master Series Paint directly on the Bones surface. (These were part of tests for methods to remove mould lines.) The brown areas on each exhibit very little damage. Some have none, some have a few small chips or scrapes. (However it should be noted the brown area of this sculpt has far fewer surface protrusions than where the green was painted.) From left to right: Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer White; Reaper Master Series Brush-On Sealer; Golden Airbrush Medium; Liquitex Matte Medium. Three of the four show pretty similar levels of damage. The figure painted with Brush-On Sealer as a primer displays the most paint damage of all figures tested in this series. From left to right: Liquitex Glazing Medium; Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium; Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer. Damage levels are pretty similar to the better performers above. The Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium and Liquitex Glazing Medium performed the best of the seven products tested. (The Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium performed better in terms of acting as a primer, and is inexpensive, so would be my recommendation between those two.)
  8. Who let the dogs out (of hell)? Hi everyone. Back again with some infernal pooches. These are the Hell hounds from the Bones 4 Fan Favorites Expansion. They were fun and challenging. All those glowing lava details were a pain. I think I managed to get them to turn out alright though. Also had fun with the lava bases. More Photos of the Hell Hounds beneath the spoiler: In all, I like these guys. Their bases were a lot of fun and really pop from a lot of my other minis. I'll be posting more of my infernal collection soon, but figured these were a great place to start. Which Hound turned out best?
  9. Hi everyone. Got a couple of Cool Cats to show off today. I went back and forth for a long time on whether or not a wanted a group of matching lions, or if I wanted variety. As a DM, I feel these would be used most often as Druidic wildshapes, familiars, or summons. I also couldn't deny that i wanted to try some different techniques on each, so I decided to go with a Lion, a Tiger, and a Black Panther. Tiger (Reaper Bones Lion 77341) First up was the Tiger. She was actually the Lioness from the Reaper Bones Lions set (77341). Her sculpt looked like it could read as a tiger, and that was my major inspiration for wanting to paint each of them differently. I used a lot of references images on her and the subsequent cats as well. Really wanted to get the coloration right. I'm happy I did, because my instinct was to use more orange tones, but in actuality, tigers have more of a warm brown color. I used red-hair colors to bring out the highlights. The stripes weren't as difficult as I was expecting. I just used my reference photos as a guide and did my best. I do worry that people will misinterpret the nose stripes as poorly-drawn whiskers though. She also looks a little dopy head-on but I promise that that's the sculpt. Click the Spoiler for more Photos Lion (Reaper Bones Lions 77341) Next up is the other half of the Lion set. This guy was always destined to be a lion. Once again, I'm really glad I used reference images. Its funny how many animals we envision incorrectly. I learned this lesson well after painting up the Bones 4 pig way too pink, even though I knew it shouldn't be that color. I'm really pleased with my coloration on the mane. The only dry brushing on this guy is the rock base. Time consuming but worth the result. I think the muscle highlights look pretty natural. Click the Spoiler for more Photos Black Panther (Legend of Drizzt Board Game - Guenhwyvar) And finally we have the Black Panther. Fun Fact: Did you know that there is no such animal as a Black Panther? It is just a nickname for melanistic variants of any Panthera species, specifically Leopards and Jaguars. This model is from The Legend of Drizzt Board Game by Wizards of the Coast. I have not read a single Drizzt Do'Urden book, but I believe the black panther, Guenhwyvar, is the ranger's companion animal. Anyways, that was influence enough to paint her up in that style. I believe I used mostly Black Jaguars as inspiration, though the markings became less important than getting the highlight colors right. I ended up using Reaper's Dark Elf Skin colors to highlight the black, which is amusing considering Drizzt's race. I added some mottled spotting afterwards, trying to imply the pattern more than paint each individual spot. I think I managed to imply muscle, fur, and spots without losing the dark shade of black I wanted. Pretty happy, especially since this sculpt was my least favorite of the bunch. Click the Spoiler for more Photos QUESTION TIME Which of the three is your favorite? What animals do you use most often in your games? Do you have a favorite animal you like to see painted in miniatures?
  10. How's it going everyone? Got a handful of baddies to show off today. Painted these a few months ago and still pretty proud of them. They're a mix of the Brigands from the Bones 4 Core, and the Bandits from Bones 3: Stoneskull Expansion. Painted them up to match. They'll work great as bandits, thugs, mercenaries, or militia men. Very versatile figures. They were also a great opportunity for me to practice my face-work. Brigands (3) 77707 I'm assuming the upcoming bones "Brigands" are in fact these three. Lovely little models. I'm a big fan of the slightly chunkier bones models that have been coming out lately. They tend to have larger surface areas and better-defined edges. They also tend to have less clutter. This makes for an easier, cleaner paint job in my opinion. More Photos below the Spoiler: Bandits 77507,77508,77509,77510 These four are from the Bones 3 Stoneskull Expansion. I've had them sitting around for awhile, but decided to paint them up with the Brigands. They have similar enough designs to fit together. In general, I like their design less, but once I painted them up that didn't matter. Perfectly serviceable mooks! More Photos beneath the Spoiler: Who's your favorite of the bunch? I'm partial to the Executioner myself, with the Bandit Bully taking a close second.
  11. I have done about 15 minis over the past year (starting with the Learn to Paint kit), after taking a 30+ year break from painting lead with Testors enamel. Each one I try to learn or improve one technique. This one I focused on pose & basing (took a little surgery to get rid of the pudding base and shape all the claws). The 'rock' is a chunk of bark. Any comments, critiques, questions or suggestions are welcome. Between this forum and YouTube, I am amazed on the knowledge and information available, in an overall great community. Getting ready for Bones V delivery!
  12. Continuing with my showcase of old Player Characters for Frostrun, we have Nox, the Drow Bard, represented by Astrid, Female Bard. Nox was a fun challenge and one of the few times that I played around with color palettes online, and tried out some test drawings to really decide on colors and patterns ahead of time. Settled on black and dark grey for the main colors, with red for pattern accents, and purple for a dash of flavor. I feel it lands properly in the category of a dark entertainer without reading too much like a Harley Quinn knock-off. Though the player she was designed for loves Harley so I'm sure the similarities were appreciated. Reverse side under the spoiler: Nox is a Drow Bard and a newcomer to Frostrun. Nox left behind her home in the Underdark to seek out a life of adventure and fame as a traveling entertainer, but soon found herself on the wrong side of the law. With nowhere else to go, Nox has turned towards Frostrun, the edge of civilization. A place where people are judged not by their past, but by their ability to survive. Unfortunately, a dark force has threatened her one chance at redemption. Will Nox rewrite the tale and come out a legend? Or will darkness have its way and leave her as a footnote in someone else's song? Read her story and check out the rest of the Frostrun project HERE.
  13. The last of my player characters I painted up for Frostrun is Ophelia Pokitz, a young halfling with sticky fingers. They're represented here by Bailey Silverbell. Ophelia was a fun mini as well. Was my first time painting a humanoid with large facial features, which made it a lot easier to bring definition to the nose, lips, and eyes. I think I even hit the cheeks with a bit of blush. I also had fun trying to make their cloak look like it was made of fur. The result is acceptable, but might also just look snow covered. You can be the judge. I also enjoyed painting a rogue that was both colorful, but subdued. The dark greens and magentas add some much needed life to the otherwise dark mini, in my opinion. More Photos beneath the spoiler: Ophelia Pokitz is what you would call a troubled teen. Orphaned at a young age, Ophelia spent much of their childhood passing from orphanage to orphanage, always finding a way to get kicked out. They eventually left the system and struck out on their own, traveling to some of the larger cities in search of a better life. Over the years, Ophelia has learned to use their small size and tiny hands to "reposes" any valuables that aren't bolted down. This habit has put them on a wanted list in many towns across the countryside. Pushed further north, Ophelia has found themselves in the town of Harpy's Hearth. Ignorant of their southern reputation, and full of gold-carrying adventurers, this could be a great place for Ophelia to catch a break and line their own pockets. It could also be a great place to find a new family. If they can survive the darkness to come. Read their story and check out the rest of the Frostrun project HERE.
  14. I’ve been working on this dragon too. It has some serious lean. In order to try to address this, I cut the front feet away from the back feet, and from each other. I was hoping gluing the to the base separately would do it, but no! Still serious lean. I decided to pin the feet to the base, but as I played with it, realized the back feet, left and right front feet would all have to be at different levels. It’s now straight and erect. I had to chop and reposition the tail for this, or else the tip dipped below the level of the base. Now I need to sculpt green stuff supports around these pins. Then I’ll try to turn them in to rocks.
  15. Help! I'm hating this paintjob. I grabbed this demilich thinking it'd be a fun and easy paintjob. But everything I do makes me hate it more. I was trying to go for a green flame look, so yellow on the inside, and gradually darker green highlights on the outside. These were drybrushed and then cleaned up by hand. I think this is where the problem started because it's not reading as fire. It just looks like a blobby mess? Should I just scrap it and start over with more of an ethereal glow that's darker in the middle and lighter on the edges? I also am not happy with the base. I've never painted a 2D base before, I've always added some kind of texturing material. And although I'm reasonably satisfied with how the base looks on the summoning circle behind the demilich, it looks so bad on the demilich base. And I think my green glow isn't helping. And finally the Bones. I imagined that if there was a green light behind the Bones then they'd be tinted green and darker on the outside. Again .. this just doesn't look right. I'm normally fairly confident in my painting abilities, but I think I've landed in unfamiliar territory and I'm just not sure how to salvage or proceed. What can I do?
  16. Starting up another, now that Janan is done. Satheras, Male Warlock. He had a really bent staff. On the behind shot you can see I cut it off at the hand, wedged a bit out and re glued it into a straighter angle. I also cut him off his integral base, since it had no texture. Hoping to try to get a little better at OSL on him, with a green gem in the staff.
  17. I'm looking for something to stick Bones, specifically Ma'al Drakar's terrain, to a wooden base. It's not thick enough, at the area I want to place it, to pin effectively. What kind of adhesives would work? I'm thinking epoxy, maybe? I just /really/ don't want to melt it accidentally and have to buy a new one.
  18. First time showing something off on the forums! Normally only post to my instagram @MoonglowMinis Had a blast painting this one up! Had to tap into my painterly side to get the glow effect I wanted and to transition the plating down to the end of the tail where there was no sculpted detail. Hope you all like it!
  19. This is my filthy first. I finally gave in and purchased one of the Bones figures. It is the otyugh-ish filth beast by Bob Ridolfi. It is a big change from the metal minis I usually purchase. The material is way bendy, almost like a green Gumby toy. The coolest thing is the way it is baka yoke, and all the pieces are "keyed" to a hole. I would have to try really hard to mess up the assembly on this one!
  20. When I first started painting this little beastie, I had visions of drool and viciousness. But after several mouldline challenges I decided that this thing's mouth was already busy enough. :-)
  21. I decided to try the new hotness of the color shifting paints. I am really impressed. I hope you all enjoy my version of the clockwork dragon.
  22. Here is a set of five zombies I painted up - first 2 are wizkids and I found I did not really like the sculpt, a sort of Elvis pirate looking zombie. Second three are a mix of a wizkid and two reaper zombies. Quick paint ups for the table - being fortune to have an in-house group to play with!
  23. Here are the two maids I painted in August. The lovely milkmaid (bones version of 039857, from bones IV I think). I almost got her eyes right.... And the server of brocolli base fame (bones version of part of 02583) - I see I still have work to keep from mashing up my greenstuff bases, it was all nice and woodgrain at one time.... she has some fierce eyebrows on her!
  24. One of the kids pulled this wonderful sculpt out of my miniature bin and said "You have to paint THIS!" So I did. I painted it concurrently with Sophie, but the children did not understand why I called them "Wyvern and Shirley". Womp womp womp. Anywayyyyy... This mini was awesome to paint, except that I wanted the wyvern to be reasonably camouflaged in its native ruins environment, but I kept accidentally making the camo too effective, and the wyvern kind of vanished into the ruins. Great for fighting adventurers, but not so much from an aesthetic perspective. I ended up with this color scheme, which was hopefully close enough to echo the stone, but not so close as to actually hide in it :-)
  25. Nagendra Warrior from Bones 2 (I think) Patterned after a Coral snake I'm really disappointed that the shading got washed out in the photo. Im a better painter than photographer I guess. Hope you enjoy it! Thanks, Gantrell
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