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Found 2 results

  1. Here's an old Medieval wargaming miniature from the 1980s, produced by Essex Miniatures. Essex were among the first to start producing larger scale 28mm miniatures, although they actually advertised them as 25mm. Up until then, 25mm had been the standard, and Essex armies towered over their opponents on the wargames table. Basing systems had been designed for 25mm figures too, so Essex figures tended to be very crowded on bases designed for the smaller scale. They tended towards rather caricatured, cartoonish features, but I always rather liked them, except for their horses which looked a bit small and spindly underneath their gigantic riders. Eventually they also started producing 15mm miniatures which were also excellent, and a lot more affordable than larger scale armies.
  2. This guy with the stripy pole is an old Essex Miniatures figure I've had since the mid '80s. At that time, they were being sold as 25mm figures, but they were HUGE compared with other manufacturers' 25mm ranges, such as Minifigs or Hinchliffe. I don't know if they were actually responsible for the scale-creep that has resulted in 28mm being the default mid-size ancients/fantasy wargaming scale, but they were certainly an early adopter. (I suspect Games Workshop were more to blame.) I never did get around to finishing the 25 (or 28) mm medieval army I was planning on: partly due to cost, partly because I found 15mm a more convenient and congenial figure scale. I've painted his spear in 5mm bands, so that I can make use of him as a scale marker. It's about another 5mm from the base of the spear to the ground (i.e. the figure base is about 5mm high), so I can count that if I want to know the height of a figure from ground up.
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