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Found 5 results

  1. These are for my youngest son's birthday at the end of the week so I'm trying to get them finished up to table top at least, fairly quickly. I'm trying to come up with a theme that works - he wants them to be blue. Now the traditional scheme for these is silver with some trim etc in an alt colour. Ok, I have blue metallic paint, which I'm trying to decide where to put exactly. But the issue I really have with it, is how to highlight it? It's really dark! This is vallejo gunmetal blue. I tried to add some different blues to a silver paint but really didn't like it. I do like this blue very much, but as I said, it's really dark and I'm having trouble. Would you add white to make it lighter? Silver? I figure the final highlight should be silver (to help join the colours together since the rest of the metal bits will aslo be highlighted silver), but the intermediate colour, that's the issue... Anyway, bad pic for WIP view (really hard to photograph unfortunately, it looks almost black but Iassure it's actually dark blue) Also I should point out, I'm not going to paint the head blue in future ones, I really didn't like it, it's too much/too dark, something. Anyway, thanks in advance for any help!
  2. Here's a mild-mannered experiment I slapped together tonight. I feel I'm pretty timid when it comes to pushing skin highlights, but go too far with shadows, so I spent some time just *playing* at roughing in colors on this Bones Black Orc. Objective: don't think too much, don't worry about doing a "good" job, and push the limits of what you're comfortable with in terms of highlights. Worked straight from the palette, mixed as I went, and didn't fuss around with layering, glazing or washing. This is where I ended up. Enjoyed myself immensely, even if it's not very pretty. Comments and constructive criticism are very welcome -- color choices, shadow and light placement, etc. are what I'm working on here.
  3. Yo, folks. Questions: 1. When using a wash, how does one decide what color to use? I'm working with the Reaper triad, and I also picked up three Citadel shades the other day. Reaper's black I think I get. It gives a lining sort of effect and black shadows, in my early experimenting. The brown seemed to do pretty much obvious stuff with the mini I've tried it on--dirtied it up, gave it some shadows not quite so dark as the black but entirely noticeable. Would it be an avenue to explore for weathering/aging/whatevering wood and/or leather? The flesh wash--should I be trying to hit faces and hands with it? Save it for more scantily-clad minis? Something altogether else? I've also got some Athonian Camoshade, Agrax Earthshade, and Drakenhof Nightshade. So basically a green, a brown, and a blue wash. Unless I'm totally misreading. The Athonian I haven't used. What situations should I be looking at for a greenish wash? The Agrax seems pretty comparable to Reaper's brown. Is it? I haven't used it yet. I picked it up because everyone seems to swear by it--seems like I've seen it talked about with everything from skeletons to wood to leather. Thoughts and/or advice? I tried out the Drakenhof on a wizard's pale bluish robes with the hopes of both shadowing and blue-ing up the color as well. It seemed to work on both counts (though I wasn't entirely thrilled with the mini, but nevermind that). Was that a reasonable idea? What other considerations/situations should I keep in mind with this one? Or am I totally off the reservation with all this? 2. I'm painting a piece right now, and I mixed up a nice chocolate brown for a robe. I'm getting ready to highlight and got to thinking--should I vary up my colors with highlighting? I've been aiming for very-light versions of the base color. What would happen if I tried highlighting with something else? Is that a thing? Like, go with a yellow on a brown or some such? Or a red or orange or something? I feel like this question particularly makes less sense than it did when I was thinking about it earlier.
  4. So today Dilvish and I went to visit Aard_Rinn and she gave me three cool brushes. (Thanks again Aard!) When I got home I immediately started to work on a serving wench for my D&D group, our last in school meet is next Friday. After I finished with everything Dilvish said the tomorrow he would teach me how to highlight hair on my minnies! I'm so excited! I'm gonna be posting picture of it as soon as I finish.
  5. Hello Fellow Fans of Blue! I love Bones, because they're cheap enough for me to use to demonstrate some fun stuff. I know a lot of newer (than me) painters have lots of questions about color, light and paint mixing, etc, so I was hoping to put a bunch of that stuff here. My goal is to walk through a monochrome blue miniature, using a Kickstarter Mini, Kickstarter paint, and some simple/intermediate techniques while doing some "teaching" on color and light. Er, not ambitious at all! I get to practice while doing it, so we're all having fun! First, the players of our little game: For this tutorial I'll be using Sapphire Blue, Pure White (take my word for it, ignore the label) and Walnut Brown, and of course, 77063 Duke Gerard. Sapphire Blue is a nice bright (saturated) blue. It's a good standard blue as well. When you look at a color wheel, I tend to think of a cobalt or ultramarine blue as "blue" but sapphire is pretty good, and it's a kickstarter color and learn to paint kit color, so most of us have it. Next, what are their painting stats? How do they behave? What can we do to them? Here they are! Simply painted as a flat swatch of color on paper. The picture is a bit dark, sorry! I'm using walnut brown as my black- see how nice a dark it is! Now, for our volunteer Male Paladin I'm going to essentially be using 3 base shades: blue, blue with some white (1:3) and blue with some brown (4:1) Here they are on the palette: walnut, walnut/blue, and blue on top and white, white/blue on the bottom. Here's an example of the Sapphire blue with a wash in the first swatch. The second is by brown/blue mix with a wash, and the third white/blue with wash. Here's where we learn a bit about saturation. The first picture is bright. Nice pretty blue. Like an autumn sky. The second is dark, moody, stormy and intense. The third a bit lighter, fluffier and softer. Each of these shades reflects light to us differently. The more pure pigment in a color, the greater the intensity. The more we dull the color, either by adding it's complement if we're mixing pure pigments or by adding white or black, the more we alter it's ability to reflect it's color back to us. I think of this like hummingbird feathers. The hummingbird's got a specialized air bubble structural pattern in it's throat feathers that literally reflect a single wavelength of light. But- only at the right angle, which is why they often look dull or black unless you catch them just right. Paint obeys the same physics. The more stuff we put it in that can potentially reflect less light, the duller the color. A possible exception/complication is white, which is nice and reflective. White is great at drawing the eye on a miniature, and great for highlighting when you want bright highlights. More on this later. One fun thing you can see when painting is how translucency can affect the way color looks. See below: Hmmn. Those look similar, don't they? The top is a thin wash of sapphire blue. The left my white/blue mix (normal paint layer) and the right my sapphire blue with a white glaze. What I take from this is that you can paint however you want, using whatever technique you want, and get the results you want! There's not one right way to do it. So things like wet blending can mimic layering/glazing or washes! Remember with washes- here I'm painting on white paper, so the surface is very uniform and the wash smooth and flat. Your miniature may have many different surfaces, primers, curves, etc. When painting on the miniature, paint will obey the laws of gravity. It will pool in crevices and drip down surfaces if allowed. Also, washes are by nature translucent, so you'll need a smooth, well-prepared surface to get the maximum effect. Ok- let play with our miniature and actually paint! I've basecoated our Paladin using just our 3 colors. Again, Sapphire blue, Blue/White mix and brown/blue mix. I tried to think about where I wanted my most intense blues, where I wanted my lighter areas, and I decided ahead of time I was going to go for a darker look to the armor. This is a nice, messy, quick "speed-painted" basecoat. No fancy stuff. I thought I had trimmed his mold lines, but I missed a few. Oh well. He's an experiment, so I'll leave it! I did wash him with dish soap and water first. The cloak and hair I'm doing in sapphire, the skin and leather/pouches/etc in white/blue and the armor in blue/brown.
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