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Found 5 results

  1. odinsgrandson

    The Faceless

    The Faceless is a neat game with some really interesting miniatures. The player token is a compass, and all of the miniatures have magnets in them to manipulate what direction the compass points. When the players move, they have to follow the compass direction. It is a really neat game, and most of the minis are little double sided dioramas (they have one side that’s a poor child about to be abducted by a monster, and the other side is the creepy little chimera that he turns them into). Anyway, here are the minis I painted:
  2. Hi everyone, it's been some time. I recently completed the individual base for the Fox Critters I painted lately. I stuck a magnet under each model and in each base socket. This way, each model and base are interchangeable. I will now build a large diorama base on which there will also be magnet encrusted socket to hold and display all the models together. As suggested by @Boaz , I used flat magnetic tape, it was easy to cut to the shape and size I needed. I used Reaper's 40mm round base and filled them with green stuff that I carved like grass. I then added natural stones and painted birch tree seeds shell and dry roots for the trees and dead gnarled branches. These 28mm pewter models were all sculpted by Dave Summers for Dark Sword Miniatures.
  3. I finished painting my cemetery fences from the reaper 3 kickstarter. I painted them up generally following the same approach as my dwarven forge dungeon tiles. Here's how I painted them: - I primed the pieces with krylon black camo primer - I then painted on a heavy drybrush of Pokorny Base Grey on all the stone parts - I then picked out some of hte stones with Pokorny Earth Stone - I then did a light drybrush with Pokorny Olive Dry Brush - I then mixed together Pokorny Base Grey and Pokorny Stone Edge Dry Brush and did a very light dry brush - Now I worked on the metal - I painted the barts with Americana Ebony Black - I then drybrushed the upper sections of the bars only with Americana Midnight Blue to provide a little color variation - I then did a light drybrush of the bars with Pokorny Base Grey, followed by a similar mix of Base Grey and Stone Edge Dry Brush - I then did an overall wash with Agrax Earthshade I then sprayed them with Testor's Dullcote. It was a quick paint job and should look good when I use them for terrain in my upcoming Deadzone game. BTW I had previously magnetized these and you can see the howto I wrote up here: Here are a couple of pictures of the finished fences.
  4. I wanted to use the cemetery fencing as terrain in wargames, and I wanted to be able to configure the fences any way I wanted, so I decided to try using magnets to hold the fencing together. I first had to decide on how to approach the problem. The straight sections were pretty simple... I could just drill into the ends and install magnets, with the polarity opposite on each end so they can be chained together. For the short sections with a flat on only one end I decided to do do half with one polarity and half with the other, so I would always have an option as to which to use. But for the columns, I had to think a bit. I didn't want to have magnets visible on the outside, and I couldn't figure out how to arrange the polarity so that it would maximize what arrangements would work. Finally I came up with the idea to simply install steel rods in the middle, and then they could attach to the straight sections with either polarity. The gate structure could also be done with steel rods. I measured things out and decided that 3/8" rod would work for the columns and for the inner posts of the gateway piece, and 1/4" rod for the outer portions of the gateway piece. So here's what I used for this: 1mmx6mm neodymium magnets (lots) 3/8" steel rod 1/4" steel rod Straight Sections These were pretty straightforward, except there wasn't a lot of room for the 6mm magnets. I had to make sure the holes were accurately placed. I usually use 1/4" drills for the 6mm magnets but because this was really tight I decided to use a 6mm drill. When I need to be accurate, I usually start with a tiny hole and use a pin vise to get the hole centered right. I then drill larger and larger holes. This is because with the larger drill bits, the drill often catches in the plastic and draws itself in, potentially ruining the piece. It works much better if I only take out a little bit of plastic each time. So here is a shortened sequence of the hole drilled (I actually used 8 drills of increasing size for each hole). Here is how it looked inside after drilling it out: And then I glued in the magnets with super glue. I decided to use 8 magnets in each end which is probably overkill but these magnets were pretty cheap... And here's how it looks from the end: Columns Now the Columns were a little tricky. Here's what I finally ended up doing. - I drilled down through the top with a 5/16" drill bit and went all the way through the bottom. This insures that the hole in the bottom is centered. I had to hold the column with pliers to keep from wrenching it out of my hand. I used leather to keep the jaws from marring the surface but cloth should work fine. - I enlarged the hole in the base with a 3/8" drill bit. This was really tricky since as I said before, with large bits the drill tends to catch in the plastic and draw itself in so this must be done with care. What I ended up doing was to drill in just a little bit, then reverse the drill and repeat, doing this several times. This way the drill bit would only carve out small sections of plastic at a time, then when the drill was reversed that divot of plastic would break off. Then when it goes forward again, it would take out a new piece of plastic, etc. I have a cordless VSR drill that I use for this that has really good slow speed control. I wouldn't try to do this with a power drill that didn't have good slow speed control. I only needed to drill in about 1/2"-3/4" deep. - I cut a 1/4" long piece of the 3/8" steel rod. I used a file to clean up the burrs, otherwise it would be much harder to get into the column. - I forced the piece of steel in the hole in the bottom of the column. I had to inset the steel piece about 2mm to get the pieces to sit correctly. If the steel is in too far, the straight section will not sit evenly on the table. If it isn't inset far enough, then the column won't sit evenly on the table. Gateway This also was a little tricky. I had to drill out through the bottom with a 1/4" drill and a 3/8" drill. Here's how it ends up looking: Again, I had to adjust the depth to get the straight sections to sit flat on the table. I didn't bother gluing the steel pieces in for the columns or the gateway since they were pretty tight fits. Here are all the pieces with steel installed: So now I can configure the fencing in many different ways, and it's resistant to accidental bumps. Here are a couple of configurations: I'm leaving the columns with open tops for now since someday we'll get cool new tops with Reaper 4. I hope this is helpful!
  5. Next time you are opening up a can of food, or when buying canned goods, measure the lid, There is a good chance it will be 3" or 4" across. To get that lid ready to be a base for a big miniature, you'll probably just need a hand held can opener. Then wash the can lid and file down any left over burs of metal if there are any, You'll have a nice durable metal base for your big minis. Magnet ready too in case you want to be able to swap bases for various rulesets. This does not generally work with pull ring type cans, so you might have to change your brands if you get the fancy cans.
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