Jump to content

Randomness: the 18th sequel


Chaoswolf
 Share

Recommended Posts

55 minutes ago, Glitterwolf said:

WOOF announcement.

 

You may have read the news about planet Wolf 1069B, life might be possible there.

 

WOOF denies that this is our home planet and assures you it's nothing more than a lifeless rock, really it is!

Please ignore those scientific reports it's probably a MEOW ruse...

The Legion Of Tentacled Species does the equivalent of a shoulder shrug and raises a half dozen tentacles into the air, sucker pads upmost, to indicate its indifference.

Get back to us when you can demonstrate the presence of liquid water.

GEM

  • Like 3
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 11k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

1 hour ago, Glitterwolf said:

WOOF announcement.

 

You may have read the news about planet Wolf 1069B, life might be possible there.

 

WOOF denies that this is our home planet and assures you it's nothing more than a lifeless rock, really it is!

Please ignore those scientific reports it's probably a MEOW ruse...

We already know what happened at Wolf 359....................

 

image.thumb.png.c82bab4933c80ff5891b139f4d58c061.png

  • Like 4
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Glitterwolf said:

WOOF announcement.

 

You may have read the news about planet Wolf 1069B, life might be possible there.

 

WOOF denies that this is our home planet and assures you it's nothing more than a lifeless rock, really it is!

Please ignore those scientific reports it's probably a MEOW ruse...

 

3 hours ago, TGP said:

GRFFN is now going to investigate the matter. 

 

And that was the push I needed to do some quick tweaks to my star constellation program.

 

The sun isn't visible to human eyes at this distance, but it would be at (-180,0). I did that just for convenience so I can later focus the images on the earth and not get bad distortions.

 

Next upgrade I have planned is to be able to identify our constellations on the other planet's sky so I can tell what in the world I'm looking at. But still, here's bright and major visible stars at Wolf 1069B. At least according to me. Dark stars are brighter (all <2.5 mag), grey-ish stars are fainter (2.5 to 3.0 mag).

 

1802846732_Wolf1069B.png.d557a1604db248b7254290b2be5b9394.png

 

 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, ShadowRaven said:

Good to know, as I am currently saving up for a smoker. I probably won't run it much below that, but I want bacon, and brisket, and turkey, and ham. 

 

I did bacon yesterday. Oh man is it good. Trying to only eat a bit at a time so as to not give myself a delicious heart attack. I'd never made brisket until I had the smoker but did in the summer. It turned out pretty good. I've also done some of the best roast beef I've ever had. We eat pork ribs fairly often and I've gotten the hang of doing them pretty well too. Need to do some sausage again. Still experimenting and trying new things but have a handful of recipes that we really like.

 

Main thing I'd advise is either store it indoors or get a cover. Even a little bit of rain and humidity caused the pellets to dissolve and reharden in a big chunk in the auger. It's a bit of a pain to pull it out and clean when that happens. Since we bought the cover I've still had to clean the auger a couple of times but it wasn't a solid mess that I had to use a wrecking bar to get out of the smoker. Just tip it over, pull a few screws and jiggle it to get it loosened up a bit. All in all pretty happy with it.

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Pegazus said:

The sun isn't visible to human eyes at this distance, but it would be at (-180,0). I did that just for convenience so I can later focus the images on the earth and not get bad distortions.


Correction: The sun would be visible at this distance. But it would be between 3 and 6.5 magnitude, so pretty faint. 


That was bothering me when we were at the restaurant.

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, TGP said:

GRFFN is now going to investigate the matter. 

 

4 hours ago, Pegazus said:

And that was the push I needed to do some quick tweaks to my star constellation program.

 

The sun isn't visible to human eyes at this distance, but it would be at (-180,0). I did that just for convenience so I can later focus the images on the earth and not get bad distortions.

 

Next upgrade I have planned is to be able to identify our constellations on the other planet's sky so I can tell what in the world I'm looking at. But still, here's bright and major visible stars at Wolf 1069B. At least according to me. Dark stars are brighter (all <2.5 mag), grey-ish stars are fainter (2.5 to 3.0 mag).

 

 

3 hours ago, Pegazus said:

Correction: The sun would be visible at this distance. But it would be between 3 and 6.5 magnitude, so pretty faint. 


That was bothering me when we were at the restaurant.


Looked into it, and learned things. Wolf 1069B orbits its star every 15-16 days. (A “year” is less than 16 days)  It is most likely tidally locked. This means a permanent daylight side and a constant night side. The Star, Wolf 1069, is a Red Dwarf (nothing to do with Jupiter Mining Corp) which means it would look a dull orangey-red in the sky of this world.  
 

So imagine if you will an orange sun, shining down on a dry, desiccated, rocky landscape because almost all the water is tied up in glaciers that cover the night side. There may be a watered temperate zone paralleling the terminator where the glaciers melt a bit and the sky is frozen in a permanent Twilight. 
 

A Twilight Zone, if you will. 
 

 

So who was Wolf ?

 

He was, Max Wolf, the head/chief astronomer at Heidelberg University . . .

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Wolf

This ^ is a really interesting read. 
 

The reason stars named Wolf 359, 1061, or 1069 keep cropping up in current astronomy is because the type of stars he specialized in studying and put in his catalog tended to be objects close to Earth (Sol-C, maybe A?). He was looking for stars that measurably moved by a few arc-seconds and anything that detectably moves is relatively close to us. 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Who's Online   2 Members, 0 Anonymous, 20 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...