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Randomness: the 18th sequel


Chaoswolf
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3 hours ago, Corsair said:

Umm, this is why I am leery of going to Australia...

image.png.08923829b414ef215ef37739a1644e14.png

Pretty sure that is a South American spider.

 

A Goliath bird-eater, if I am right.

 

The Auld Grump - looking on Wikipedia... looks about right, but I didn't need to know that it's flavor is described as 'shrimp-like'.... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goliath_birdeater

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13 hours ago, Green Eyed Monsty said:

First time I've made this info public but the company that made the Pac-Man/Ms Pac Man games in the USA used the same key number on every single back door on every machine for a couple of years.  Popular games could run into production runs in the thousands.  This is a company well known in the slot machine field for many decades, so it isn't like high security on such things isn't something they weren't aware of.

Once the back door is opened/removed [it was just a plywood or fiberboard panel with a lapped grove bottom and a single lock at the top the entire interior of the machine was accessible, including the coin vault which could be opened/removed by unfastening four fasteners of a common type and size.  Common operator practice was to run wallboard screws in either from the side of the cabinet near the back or install a strap metal bar on the back of the machine.  This only slows down a determined thief but was usually enough of a deterrent for most locations.

What's even more insane is the back panel keys were shipped on a hook right next to the coin mechanisms, two keys with each machine,  as an industry standard practice.  If one knew how to pop the coin mech. doors you could easily grab the back door keys.

GEM

GEM

I remember that from my years in coin-op.   The Family Fun Centers I worked at used tamper proof torx screws to secure the back panels., because back then it was hard to get the bits/drivers for them. 

First thing any new machine received was a "security upgrade" in terms of replacing locks with our own locks, and screwing down various panels. It was a little easier ensuring the physical security of the machines when they were all together in the same location in the location's arcades.  When I worked for the other coin op company, it was a little tougher because the machines were scattered in bars and businesses throughout the SF Bay Area. 

Never really had too many break in problems, most thefts were opportunity style related to employees failing to properly lock things up or walking away while they had something open.  Did have a number of instances where entire machines were stolen in broad daylight.  In one case, they caught two guys trying to load a Mrs PacMan table into the trunk of their car in the parking lot of the family fun center.   In another instance in my last month in coin op, our route collections guy pulled up to a bar to find a rental truck with a crude magnetic sign with our company name on it, and two guys in home made company shirts with a dolly starting to load up a machine.  They ran off without their dolly & our machine when they realized their "cover" was blown.  Don't know if they were ever caught, but the police took the dolly as evidence. 

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4 hours ago, kristof65 said:

I remember that from my years in coin-op.   The Family Fun Centers I worked at used tamper proof torx screws to secure the back panels., because back then it was hard to get the bits/drivers for them. 

First thing any new machine received was a "security upgrade" in terms of replacing locks with our own locks, and screwing down various panels. It was a little easier ensuring the physical security of the machines when they were all together in the same location in the location's arcades.  When I worked for the other coin op company, it was a little tougher because the machines were scattered in bars and businesses throughout the SF Bay Area. 

Never really had too many break in problems, most thefts were opportunity style related to employees failing to properly lock things up or walking away while they had something open.  Did have a number of instances where entire machines were stolen in broad daylight.  In one case, they caught two guys trying to load a Mrs PacMan table into the trunk of their car in the parking lot of the family fun center.   In another instance in my last month in coin op, our route collections guy pulled up to a bar to find a rental truck with a crude magnetic sign with our company name on it, and two guys in home made company shirts with a dolly starting to load up a machine.  They ran off without their dolly & our machine when they realized their "cover" was blown.  Don't know if they were ever caught, but the police took the dolly as evidence. 

We used torx fasteners as well for certain security applications.

We also used internal locks on the covers for the coin boxes and vaults that too many people discarded when a machine was put into service.

Several times the additional $3 lock on a coin box cover was enough extra security to deter somebody who had managed to get inside the machine, despite our external security measures.

Had several machines, including one soda machine at an exterior location completely wrecked by people trying to get to the coin boxes.

Interestingly enough, when we started equipping some machines with bill validators we never had problems with people trying to break into the machines with validators and stackers.

 

GEM

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It's the first day of summer and here I am running around in a light weight sweat shirt.

It would appear the actual summer weather is going to be late in arriving and we will probably see a "late" summer with the high temps extending into the early fall.

At least one of the local ski resorts is planning for a Fourth of July ski event we still have that much snow at the higher elevations.

In other "news" the cricket infestation previously mentioned is still going on.

GEM

Edited by Green Eyed Monsty
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