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Ichabod Crane

Do we have a Latin Speaker in the house???

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I was sent via email a few Latin phrases. 4 short lines of 3-4 words each.

Babel fish doesn't handle Latin (and is way off on it's Russian, btw)

Anyone up to translations let me know. I've no idea what it says.

It's from someone I know .. not spam mail if yer wonderin'.

 

Utere emendatis verbis, Noli capere aliquid private,

Noli facere sumptiones, Semper fac tuum optimum

 

Thank-you very much. :poke:

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"Whichever of you corrects truth, unwilling to seize something deprived of, unwilling to take on the cost, you will always be noble."

 

Sounds idiomatic to me. Doesn't exacly make sense... of course Latin class was... golly, 17 years ago. So my translation is likely pretty far off.

 

kit

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Does anyone know what idiomatic means? ::P: (j/k)

Thanx Kit! 17 years or not ... you still rock!

 

Your assumtion is probably right on the money, actually.

I'm almost positive the person that sent the text to me

was trying to link words together to form the phrases and

not considering any type of grammatical changes in tense.

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Larry McMurtry answered that one in an article I read once. It means either "a grape ripens when it sees another grape" ... I don't know exactly what McMurtry meant by it but I have a guess which is the best I can do. In Irish there is a saying "Aithníonn ciaróg chiaróg eile" which means "one beetle knows another beetle" and I imagine if the two have much to do with each other, it is about how Gus and Call really were two of a kind that were best for each other.

 

Requiescat in pace you see it on tombstones a lot. Rest in peace.

 

Always where under where huh? That's funny.

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Always where under where huh? That's funny.

Yeah, it's one that the translation needs to be heard more than read. I barely passed my Latin, and only then because the stories we read were in Ovid's Metamorpheses, and I recognized all the myths. The professor never required us to do literal translations. I would just write what I remembered of the myths I read as a kid :devil:

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Carthago Delenda Est

 

Cicero (I believe) used to end every speach he made with this phrase. And I had a latin teacher try to end every class with it as well.

 

Edit:

But for anyone that wants to know useful phrases in Latin I suggeest Classical Latin for All Occassions. It is out of print now but fun if found used for a couple of dollars.

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Only latin I know is: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.

 

Kim

:devil:

 

"It is sweet and honourable to die for one's country". -_-

 

You know it from Horace's Odes, or from the Wilfred Owen Poem?

 

Tommy. ::):

Wilfred Owen. Read it in school many years ago. Those WWI poems are quite nasty, glad I never experienced trench warfare.

 

Kim

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