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Enchantra

If you were to create

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Alright. If you were to create your own RP game, what would you include in it for rules and character setup? What kind of framework would you follow? I'm curious as I know of several people here who have actually taken the time to try to do this.

 

So go ahead and post your random thoughts on this. This just intrigues me. ::):

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For me it would depend on what kind of game. I like point-based systems like the Hero System because it gives people a little more freedom in the creation of their character. I probably wouldn't have such a wide range of stats for characters as that system does, though.

 

As for abilities/skills/powers ... that's a little tougher. You need something that is a little more balanced. For fantasy, the Hero System isn't as good because the way the powers work to make spells is rather limiting with the power levels involved. GURPS is great for magic, but then the mages can be almost all-powerful. That's where D&D is good because the magic system is much more balanced with the whole of the game genre. Unfortunately, with D&D you tend to be a little more limited in the freedom you have in character concept.

 

As for basics, I think you'd definately need a good skill list, a general bestiary and guidelines for GMs to add/create their own beasties, at least the rudiments of a world for those just starting out and giving them someplace to base the characters (even if the world isn't super-defined yet) and a system of rewards for experience that is fair for the type of character creation system you choose as well as giving the characters room to grow and advance in power/skill/ability.

 

I admire people who do make their own systems as it takes a lot of time, effort, playtesting, and decision-making.

 

You also need to decide the highest possible tech level of your system, or give GMs something to go by in order to create their own tech levels easily.

 

I think once you get those basics down, then you've got your system set up to decide what kind of dice system to use (d6, d10, all of them).

 

Then it's a decision on how to make combat work and how quickly and easily you want it to flow as well as allowing players/GMs options (like in Hero System with choosing to go with the Hit Location Chart or the Stun Multiplier dice roll instead).

 

Okay, that's too much thinking for me with a headache right now.

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Base it on a d12. It's the most divisable die in the game.

 

Keep it to a classless system. Let people build what they want.

 

Make the system, then write the backstory, not the other way around. Then you get a game system that you need to adjust to fit your background.

 

You need to decide if you want realism or heroics in your game. Award for ballsiness, but punish outright stupidity.,

 

Many, many other thoughts floating though my head, but Tenchi Muyo is on right now.

 

/scamper!

 

--Ol' Unkie Stormhammer

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Many, many other thoughts floating though my head, but Tenchi Muyo is on right now.

Oh dear I should introduce you to my friend TJ then. You and him could probably spend HOURS watching that.

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Many, many other thoughts floating though my head, but Tenchi Muyo is on right now.

"It's the standard disguise for PEEPING!!" :lol:

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I like games where characters earn skill-ranks ONLY by successfully accomplishing the task (trial-error) or by spending time learning a new skill. I also like games where healing potions and scrolls of power don't solve ALL the world's problems.

 

The Perfect Game would be a campaign game where characters advance in skills a bit more slowly but develop in personality more quickly. I like backstories, fluff, and hidden agendas... maybe intermingled with a WEE bit of "hack and slay -- haul it away" too.

 

What the world needs now is a RPG for first-level characters, but with enough plot-complexity to interest a party of seasoned RPG players.

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I would base stats on a system that can easily be converted into "percentiles" so that people can easily know where they are in relation to the "average".

 

My favorite is to use 2d10 to get a score from 2-20. Use 3d10, drop the lowest for stats that tend to be better than normal, but that should be random (like the strength score of a hero built using a hero template.

 

I would NEVER EVER EVER EVER use points. It creates the illusion of perfect game balance without actual game balance. Instead the balance should be in the hands of the GM.

 

With a point system, the Game Balance is too much in the hands of the Players. Eventually one or several will find one or several odd loopholes. Once you find a way to create characters that are point balanced but not game balanced, you usually manage to get that character into play for a while before the GM realizes it, because the GM is trusting the points.

 

Then what do you do??

 

And balancing points becomes unnecessary paperwork for typical goons. So you use "templates"...but they aren't templates, they are CLONES. A template should be a starting place for quick and easy customization.

 

With point systems, they really aren't.

 

I hate 'em. They seem easy...to the players. But they are extra work for the GM, and trick the GM into thinking things are balanced when they aren't.

 

So, anyway...

 

I'd use 2d10 for basic stats.

 

I'd CALCULATE HP from basic stats rather than having it BE a basic stat.

 

And I'd think hard about when in the game you want to use opposed rolls, and when you want to use one player's role against a target.

 

That's the basics of it. I used that to modify the SW RPG that came out 10-15 years ago and to make it compatible with the "Star Warriors" space ship skirmish game. (they tried to be compatible, but weren't really).

 

I also did a Psionic-only RPG. Was fun, but ran one campaign on it & now it's in a box somewhere....

 

well, gotta go. My partner is waiting for me & I feel like I deserve some hugs this weekend!

 

cd

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I have a friend who is great at making up RPGs on the spot. He made one up that was based solely on d12, and the only skills you could get were things that ended in "ing" like "kicking", "shooting", and "Brendon Killing-ing" (specific player in our group ^_^ ) It was great fun, and was improved with v. 2.0.

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My encounter with the rpg Fudge has forced me to create countless games and really helped me understand that rules and setting are hardly linked at all. Fudge provides more of a tool kit to make things work with your campaign idea.

 

Might I suggest checking out http://www.fudgerpg.com/ You can download a free copy there.

 

Also good are The Forge forums. Check out the articles and the various forums. Things get a bit heavy in there and there's definitely some wierd terminology bandied about, but some absolutely amazing games are being produced as a result of the discussions there:

 

http://www.indie-rpgs.com/

 

Nathaniel

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I have used Fudge extensively, and found it to be a pretty good set of tools, though I think it'd work better as numbers than adjectives.

 

For character generation, I heartily recommend Five Point Fudge. Basically, you have five points to put into broad areas. The amount of points you put in the area determines the number of skills of what level you can choose from that area.

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Yeah, Fudge might be the way to go for the rules-light play I'm preferring as I age.

 

While I don't enjoy fiddling about with charts and detailed rules, I love customizability of characters. If I were making a system, I'd build it on point-buying rather than classes, with the goal of a player's being confident in exactly what his character can and can't do. That's why I love the nitty-gritty of GURPS character generation, but use very little of its other rules. I've only picked at Fudge, but it would seem to offer that sort of play. It's also very nearly open-source, so if I were going to create a game, I might choose to apply for the free license--I think it's still free, anyway.

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If I was publishing a game (be it printed, free online, for sale as a pdf, whatever), I'd likely include Fudge and OGL just because Fudge has such a rabid following amoung those who like it and they like to support Fudge game developers and OGL because d20 players make up the majority of the RPGers out there. I'd essentially be offering two very different approaches to the same setting. One rather story based and light (fudge) and the other crunchy and gamey (OGL/d20).

 

Nathaniel

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